free things to do in New York City
Free events for Sunday, 02/17/19
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Free Events, Free Things to Do in New York City!  Read More

New York is full of wonderful things to do beyond the must see and must do New York attractions such as the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, Metropolitan Museum, Ellis Island, Rockefeller Center and St. Patrick's Cathedral. There are many more places to visit and places to see if you visit New York for more than several days, or if you live here!  

Go off the beaten path and find hidden treasures which cost you nothing, but are extremelly enjoyable and much less crowded then famous tourist spots.

Experience New York with no lines and no hassle.  Our site tells you all about free tours, free concerts, free movies, free theater performances, free lessons (tai chi, yoga, drawing, dancing, foreign languages, ets), etc you can take advantage of whether you live in the city or spend just a couple of days here.
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The quality and quantity of
free events,
free things to do
that happen in New York City
every day of the year
is truly amazing.

So don't miss the opportunities
that only New York provides:
stop wondering what to do;
start taking advantage of
free events to go to,
free things to do in NYC
today!

62  Best Free Things to Do in New York City, NYC

We all know that best things in life are free, but nowhere it's true more than in New York (NYC).  Free shows, free concerts, free movies, free tours, free poetry readings, free lessons of any kind: yoga, tai chi, tango, dancing, drawing, photography,  and much much more happen all over the city every day of the year. Take a look at those free 62  events that our editors think are the best things to do to in New York City at this point.   Please keep in mind that all those best things to do are free unless otherwise noted. 

Sunday, February 17, 2019

City Walk | Pushcarts, Pickles, and Million Dollar Pastrami: The Jewish Lower East Side Tour
The Lower East Side was once the most densely populated neighborhood on the planet. This 10 stop walking tour, will visit some major historical sites of the Jewish Lower East Side, from the late 1800's all the way up until present day. Weaving stories of triumph, heartbreak, and humor together, this tour is at once informative, entertaining, and may put you in the mood for a knish or four.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Feb 17
11:00 am

to 1:00 pm

Free

City Walks, February 17, 2019, 02/17/2019, Pushcarts, Pickles, and Million Dollar Pastrami: The Jewish Lower East Side Tour
Classical Music | Works by English and US Composers
The North/South Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Max Lifchitz performs works by composers from England and the US. Featured will be works by Peter Aviss, Edna Longoria, Mikhail Johnson and Hilary Tann. Violist Rita Porfiris appears as soloist. About the Performers Since 1980, North/South Chamber Orchestra has garnered widespread praise for its eloquent performances of music by composers of our time. Under the leadership of Max Lifchitz, its founder and director, this adventurous ensemble has brought to the attention of the New York public over 750 different works by composers from every corner of the world. A graduate of The Juilliard School and Harvard University, Max Lifchitz has appeared in concert and recital throughout the US, Latin America and Europe. His CD album devoted to the piano music of México elicited the following comment from Fanfare Magazine: "After several listenings, North/South Recordings No. 1010 is recommended to more than just a specialist audience because of the wide variety of attractive and challenging music that it contains. Lifchitz is a poetic pianist with requisite power to make the many granitic climaxes register. Easily, the most interesting new piano disc so far in 1996."    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Feb 17
3:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 17, 2019, 02/17/2019, Works by English and US Composers
Classical Music | Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time
Pianist Nana Shi and ensemble perform Messiaen's (1908-1992) Quartet for the End of Time (1941). Pianist Nana Sh has recently performed with world class musicians such as Joseph Lin, Lucy Shelton, Da Capo Chamber Players, and Momenta Quartet, among others. Based in New York City, her recent engagements include performances at Carnegie Hall, Merkin Hall, Roerich Museum, Tenri Cultural Institute, and Chelsea Music Festival. Quartet for the End of Time is a piece of chamber music by the French composer Olivier Messiaen. It was premiered in 1941. The piece is scored for clarinet, violin, cello, and piano. Messiaen wrote the piece while a prisoner of war in German captivity and it was first performed by his fellow prisoners. It has come to be recognized as one of his most important works.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Feb 17
5:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 17, 2019, 02/17/2019, Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time
Classical Music | Tchaikovsky Competition Winner Performs Concertos by Beethoven and more
HaeSun Paik, piano; New York Classical Players (NYCP), Dongmin Kim, conductor. Program Samuel Adler (b.1928) Concertino No. 3 Beethoven (1770-1827) Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op. 15 Beethoven (1770-1827) Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 About the Performers Pianist HaeSun Paik, who won the Third Prize at one of the most prestigious piano competition in the world - Tchaikovsky competition, has been hailed as a “sensitive and thinking musician first and an awesome technician second” (Los Angeles Times) with a “big and individual personality” (New York Times), whose performances are “a wonder — elastic, mercurial, charged with meaning, surprising” (Boston Globe) and “a rare example of technique actually serving both idea and feeling, head and heart” (Musical America). Having garnered top prizes at international piano competitions such as the Queen Elisabeth, Leeds, William Kapell, and the Tchaikovsky, Ms. Paik has performed concerts around the world in solo recitals, concerti with orchestras, and chamber music ensembles. New York Classical Players (NYCP) is the region’s only professional orchestra sharing exclusively free performances. Comprised of creative and virtuosic young musicians, NYCP’s adventurous programming shares familiar masterpieces, bold new commissions, and unexpected musical treasures.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Feb 17
5:00 pm

to 6:45 pm

Free

Concerts, February 17, 2019, 02/17/2019, Tchaikovsky Competition Winner Performs Concertos by Beethoven and more

Monday, February 18, 2019

City Walk | Historic Greenwich Village Tour: Beats, Bohemians, and Icons from the 1950's to Today
Bob Dylan, Richard Pryor, Edgar Allen Poe, Jane Jacobs, James Baldwin, Jack Kerouac, Dave Attell, Patti Smith, Joan Baez, and Truman Capote are just a few of the thousands of accomplished artists, writers, radicals, and performers who made their way through Greenwich Village. This tour, primarily focusing on the 1950s onward, visits the hangouts that have defined legendary people and the spirit of this iconic neighborhood.    New York City, NY; NYC

Mon, Feb 18
11:00 am

to 1:00 pm

Free

City Walks, February 18, 2019, 02/18/2019, Historic Greenwich Village Tour: Beats, Bohemians, and Icons from the 1950's to Today
Comedy Club | The Mosquito Comedy Variety Show
Actress and Emmy award-winning commentator Nancy Giles (CBS News Sunday Morning) hosts this fast and furious monthly variety show with stand-ups, sit-downs and music. Giles, who starred on ABC's China Beach" and Delta series will be joined by a rotating cast of regulars who have in the past included: Pat Candaras, Cynthia Kaplan, Peri Gaffney, Kathryn Rossetter, Sheila Head, Susan Burns, Sue Giles, Nancy Shayne and more.    New York City, NY; NYC

Mon, Feb 18
7:30 pm

Free

Comedy Clubs, February 18, 2019, 02/18/2019, The Mosquito Comedy Variety Show

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Discussion | Is Liberalism Making the World Less Fair? Investor vs. Human Rights in the Global Economy
Liberal legal systems can make economic life predictable, but have a spottier track record protecting the interests of those who lack economic power. Heading into the 2020 political cycle, what role do (or could) US institutions play in aggravating or lessening economic liberalism’s downsides? This is a discussion with three authors on their recent books on this tension. With -- Samuel Moyn is professor of law and history at Yale, and the author of Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World . -- Todd N. Tucker is a political scientist and fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and the author of Judge Knot: Politics and Development in International Investment Law -- Tonya Putnam is associate professor of political science at Columbia University, and the author of Courts without Borders: Laws, Politics, and U.S. Extraterritoriality.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 19
12:10 pm

Free

Discussions, February 19, 2019, 02/19/2019, Is Liberalism Making the World Less Fair? Investor vs. Human Rights in the Global Economy
Classical Music | Bach at Noon
The organ works of J.S. Bach (1685-1750) offered in 30-minute meditations. Bach at Noon concerts take place every Tuesdays through Fridays, from September 11, 2018 to May 22, 2019.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 19
12:20 pm

to 12:50 pm

Free

Concerts, February 19, 2019, 02/19/2019, Bach at Noon
Author Reading | The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Medicine, and the Great War
The injuries suffered by soldiers during WWI were as varied as they were brutal. How could the human body suffer and often absorb such disparate traumas? Why might the same wound lead one soldier to die but allow another to recover? In The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe, Stefanos Geroulanos (Professor of History) and Todd Meyers (Associate Professor of Anthropology) uncover a fascinating story of how medical scientists came to conceptualize the body as an integrated yet brittle whole. Responding to the harrowing experience of the Great War, the medical community sought conceptual frameworks to understand bodily shock, brain injury, and the vast differences in patient responses they occasioned. Geroulanos and Meyers carefully trace how this emerging constellation of ideas became essential for thinking about integration, individuality, fragility, and collapse far beyond medicine: in fields as diverse as anthropology, political economy, psychoanalysis, and cybernetics.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 19
6:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, February 19, 2019, 02/19/2019, The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Medicine, and the Great War
Discussion | Russia and the US: Here We Go Again…
The US and Russia are revisiting some of the flashpoints of the old US-Soviet rivalry—influence over the direction of Europe, security in the Middle East—and antagonizing each other in Ukraine and Georgia, creating a new conflict corridor in Russia’s own backyard. What do these new/old disagreements tell us about the players? And what do they and the many other points of contention between the two tell us about the global setting nearly 30 years since the disappearance of the Soviet Union? Veterans of the “old” Cold War, Peter Clement, a senior research scholar/adjunct professor at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs, and Rick Levitt, adjunct assistant professor, will have a wide-ranging conversation about the key factors driving Russia’s new foreign policy activism, including how much of it is ascribable to an aggressive Vladimir Putin and to what extent, if any, the Russian president’s external policies tells us something about his broader personal agenda. They will also attempt to backtest this apparently personality-driven strategy against traditional Russian national interests.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 19
6:30 pm

Free

Discussions, February 19, 2019, 02/19/2019, Russia and the US: Here We Go Again&hellip;

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Tour | Guided Historical Tour of the Columbia University Campus
Join this tour to learn more about the history, architecture, and sculpture of Columbia and the Morningside Heights campus. Whether you're an amateur New York City historian or visiting campus for the first time, you will leave the tour knowing more about our storied past. Given that the tour route is outdoors, please be aware that tours are occasionally suspended due to inclement weather.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 20
1:00 pm

Free

Tours, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Guided Historical Tour of the Columbia University Campus
Jazz | Renowned Jazz Guitarist and His Trio
Bill Wurtzel, a renowned jazz guitarist, has performed worldwide with many jazz greats. His style in his own words: "I love mainstream jazz and the American songbook. Albums I’ve played on range from gospel, mainstream and soul jazz to Christmas songs in Latin."    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 20
2:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Renowned Jazz Guitarist and His Trio
Talk | Dapper Dan, Legendary Harlem Fashion Designer
Dapper Dan discusses the Harlem Renaissance and its impact on fashion and culture.  Dapper Dan's influential boutique, operated from 1982–92 and is most associated with introducing high fashion to the hip hop world, with his clients over the years including Eric B. & Rakim, Salt-N-Pepa, LL Cool J, and Jay-Z. In 2017, he launched a fashion line with Gucci, with which he opened a second store and atelier, Dapper Dan's of Harlem, in 2018.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 20
6:00 pm

Free

Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Dapper Dan, Legendary Harlem Fashion Designer
Talk | Adventures in Italian Opera: A Conversation with Soprano Nadine Sierra
The fourth Adventure in Italian Opera with Fred Plotkin of this season features American soprano Nadine Sierra, performing this season at The Metropolitan Opera in Verdi's Rigoletto.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 20
6:30 pm

Free

Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Adventures in Italian Opera: A Conversation with Soprano Nadine Sierra
Classical Music | Works by Italian and American Composers for Violin, Viola D’amore and Piano
Marco Fusi, violin, viola d’amore; Kukuruz Quartet: Philip Bartels, Duri Collenberg, Simone Keller, Lukas Rickli. Program Salvatore Sciarrino Fra sé Giacinto Scelsi Xnoybis I, II, III Sciarrino Capriccio di una corda John Cage The ten thousand things Marcel Zaes Quartet No. 10 for four electronic metronomes Julius Eastman Gay Guerrilla About the Performers Marco Fusi is a violinist/violist, and a passionate advocate for the music of our time. Among many collaborations with emerging and established composers, he has premiered works by Billone, Sciarrino, Eötvös, Cendo and Ferneyhough. Marco has performed with Pierre Boulez, Lorin Maazel, Alan Gilbert, Beat Furrer, David Robertson, and frequently plays with leading contemporary ensembles including Klangforum Wien, MusikFabrik, Meitar Ensemble, Mivos Quartet, Ensemble Linea, among others. The Kukuruz Quartet was founded in 2014 in a corn field – “Kukuruz” means corn in several languages, and the Swiss-German expression “Mais machen” (literally “to make corn”) means to stir up mischief. The four pianists were first witnessed making their contribution to a production by musician and director Ruedi Häusermann at the Zurich Schauspielhaus. The quartet was performing on four so-called “well-prepared one-hand pianos”, having spent long sessions exploring different preparations and constructions. From the outset, the group has been engaged with classical music, jazz and improvisation. In the same year it was founded, Kukuruz also started its involvement with the works of Julius Eastman. They took Eastman's work on a tour through Switzerland, Germany and Holland, where they performed in concert halls, clubs, bars, and breweries, and made Eastman’s pieces accessible to a wide audience.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 20
7:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Works by Italian and American Composers for Violin, Viola D&rsquo;amore and Piano
Play | 2 New Plays: Hal / The Tall Ones
The first pair of plays in the New Voices Festival will be Hal, written by Collin McConnell and directed by Joey Rizzolo; and The Tall Ones, written by Miles Orduna and directed by Rebecca Etzine. Presented by the College of Performing Arts.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 20
8:00 pm

Free

Plays, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, 2 New Plays: Hal / The Tall Ones

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Concert | Baroque ensemble performs works by Telemann (1681 – 1767)
Tableau Vivant performs works by Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 – 1767) About the Program Telemann is one of the most prolific composers in history and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. Telemann's music incorporates several national styles (French, Italian, German) and is even at times influenced by Polish popular music. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies and his music is an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles. About the ensemble Tableau Vivant (English: living picture) is an ensemble devoted to 17th & 18th century repertoire for violin, viola da gamba and basso continuo in various formations. Its core members, violinist Karen Marie Marmer and keyboardist Dongsok Shin are principals of the internationally acclaimed ensemble, Rebel. Tableau Vivant has performed at Midtown Concerts and Downtown Music at Grace series in White Plains. Performers: David Ross, traverso Karen Marie Marmer, violin Arnie Tanimoto, viola da gamba Dongsok Shin, harpsichord.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
1:15 pm

to 2:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Baroque ensemble performs works by Telemann (1681 &ndash; 1767)
Screening | The Lost Tapes: Malcolm X: Up-close Look At The Civil Rights Movement
This is a 43 min. screening of the Smithsonian Channel’s The Lost Tapes: Malcolm X which offers an up-close look at the Civil Rights Movement through the eyes of one of its most charismatic and controversial leaders. February 21 marks annual commemoration of Malcolm X on the anniversary of his assassination. Malcolm X (1925 - 1965) was an American Muslim minister and human rights activist. He has been called one of the most influential African Americans in history.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
3:00 pm

Free

Screenings, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, The Lost Tapes: Malcolm X: Up-close Look At The Civil Rights Movement
Opening Reception | Drawing for Print: Mind Fucks, Kultur Klashes, Pulp Fiction & Pulp Fact
An exhibition that examines the mind and career of R. Crumb, an American cartoonist and musician. His work displays a nostalgia for American folk culture of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and satire of contemporary American culture. The exhibition will feature a wide array of printed matter culled from the artist’s archive: tear sheets of drawings and comics, taken directly from the publications where the works first appeared, as well as related ephemera. These often fragile works on paper will be installed across the walls of the gallery. Further illuminating Crumb’s practice, the show will also feature a selection of rare sketchbooks and original drawings by the artist.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
6:00 pm

to 8:00 pm

Free

Opening Receptions, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Drawing for Print: Mind Fucks, Kultur Klashes, Pulp Fiction & Pulp Fact
Concert | Rhythm Is the Cure: Hands-On Tambourine & Frame Drum Performance
The final performance by the participants in a workshop taught by internationally renowned singer and percussionist Alessandra Belloni. The purpose of this workshop was to introduce general audiences to a very rich tambourine and folk dance culture with an active current performance practice in Southern Italy.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
6:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Rhythm Is the Cure: Hands-On Tambourine & Frame Drum Performance
Discussion | Birthright Citizenship in an Evolving Political Landscape
Birthright citizenship, seen for more than a century as a bedrock American right, has become a hot-button immigration issue. This panel discussion brings together historians, scholars and journalists to discuss how and why birthright citizenship has evolved, from Reconstruction to immigration policy today. They'll explore its impact on the lives of American families over time.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
6:30 pm

Free

Discussions, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Birthright Citizenship in an Evolving Political Landscape
Jazz | Jazz Quartet: Sax, Piano, Drums and Bass
Karel Růžička Quartet presents Grace and Gratitude. Saxophonist and composer Karel Růžička will be performing with acclaimed musicians Jon Cowherd (piano), James Genus (bass) and E.J. Strickland (drums). Grace & Gratitude comprises exclusively Růžička's own compositions. During his career Růžička has performed as a sideman with many other legendary musicians on the global scene George Benson, Dean Brown, Hiram Bullock, Mike Stern, Joe Locke, Bob Mintzer, Ravi Coltrane, among others.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
7:00 pm

to 9:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Jazz Quartet: Sax, Piano, Drums and Bass
Jazz | Jazz Singer-Songwriter from South Africa
Singer and songwriter Vuyo Sotashe is becoming an integral part of New York City’s jazz scene. After moving here in 2013, the young South African artist has quickly made his mark, earning a Fulbright Scholarship and finalist positions in several international competitions, while also collaborating with artists such as Dee Dee Bridgewater, Michael Mwenso, Brianna Thomas, Elio Villafranca, Duchess, and the cabaret persona Jomama Jones, to name a few.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 21
7:30 pm

Free

Concerts, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Jazz Singer-Songwriter from South Africa

Friday, February 22, 2019

Talk | An Evening with an Experimental Animator
Jodie Mack is an experimental animator, associate professor of animation at Dartmouth College, and a 2018/19 Film Study Center Fellow at Harvard University. Her handmade films use collage to explore the relationship between graphic cinema and storytelling, the tension between form and meaning. Her films study domestic and recycled materials to illuminate the elements shared between fine art abstraction and mass-produced graphic design. Mack’s 16mm films have screened at a variety of venues, including at the Images Festival, Projections at the New York Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, BFI London Film Festival, National Gallery of Art, and International Film Festival Rotterdam, among others.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Feb 22
6:00 pm

Free

Talks, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, An Evening with an Experimental Animator
Author Reading | Mind Over Memes: Passive Listening, Toxic Talk, and Other Modern Language Follies
Too often our use of language has become lazy, frivolous, and even counterproductive. We rely on cliches and bromides to communicate in such a way that our intentions are lost or misinterpreted. In a culture of "takeaways" and buzzwords, it requires study and cunning to keep language alive. Diana Senechal examines words, concepts, and phrases that demand reappraisal. Targeting a variety of terms, the author contends that a "good fit" may not always be desirable; delivers a takedown of the adjective "toxic"; and argues that "social justice" must take its place among other justices. This book also includes a critique of our modern emphasis on quick answers and immediate utility. By scrutinizing words and phrases that serve contemporary fads and follies, this book stands up against the excesses of language and offers engaging alternatives. Drawing on literature, philosophy, social sciences, music, and technology, Senechal offers a rich framework to make fresh connections between topics. Combining sharp criticism, lyricism, and wit, Mind over Memes argues for judicious and imaginative speech. Diana Senechal is an educator and author whose writing has appeared in The New Republic, Education Week, American Educator, and The New York Times. Senechal is the 2011 winner of the Hiett Prize and the author of Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture (Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2012), which was a Choice Outstanding Academic title. She now teaches at the Varga Katalin Gimnázium in Szolnok, Hungary..    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Feb 22
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Mind Over Memes: Passive Listening, Toxic Talk, and Other Modern Language Follies
Concert | Black History Month Celebration Through The Arts: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin
Featuring the programs in Dance Education, Educational Theatre, Jazz Studies, Music Education, Vocal Performance, and more    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Feb 22
7:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Black History Month Celebration Through The Arts: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin
Lecture | The Realist Case for Eliminating Nuclear Weapons
This talk will dismantle the rationale for keeping nuclear weapons, reframe the debate, and present evidence and arguments demonstrating that eliminating nuclear weapons is not only realistic, but that it is the only pragmatic and prudent policy choice available. Speaker Ward Wilson is a Senior Fellow and director of the Rethinking Nuclear Weapons Project. He is respected internationally for his research into and critiques of the foundations of nuclear weapons thinking and new perspectives. His book, Five Myths about Nuclear Weapons, is a groundbreaking rethinking of nuclear weapons based on recently uncovered and reanalyzed facts from Cold War archives. Wilson has spoken at the State Department, the Pentagon, the U.K. House of Commons, the European Parliament, the Brookings Institution, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Feb 22
7:00 pm

Free

Lectures, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, The Realist Case for Eliminating Nuclear Weapons
Play | 2 New Plays: Hal / The Tall Ones
The first pair of plays in the New Voices Festival will be Hal, written by Collin McConnell and directed by Joey Rizzolo; and The Tall Ones, written by Miles Orduna and directed by Rebecca Etzine. Presented by the College of Performing Arts.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Feb 22
8:00 pm

Free

Plays, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, 2 New Plays: Hal / The Tall Ones
Concert | From the Capoeira and Bossa Nova to Jazz
Musician and actor, Carlos Dias has led a remarkably eclectic international career. He has appeared in many of Brazil’s highest-rated novelas (soap operas) and musical productions imported from Broadway; sung pop-jazz at top New York venues; worked as an acrobatic dancer; and recorded several CDs of dance music and American standards. In his performance “The living room”, Carlos Dias as a soloist, travels through his Brazilian roots from the Capoeira and Bossa Nova to Jazz. Playing his Berimbau, the pandeiro and the guitar, he talks about his music influences.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Feb 22
9:00 pm

to 11:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, From the Capoeira and Bossa Nova to Jazz

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Tour | 13 tours, all City neighborhoods, any time of the day, choose one tour or many
These free tours take place at various times during the day, all day long. You can make reservations for as many tours as your schedule allows. SoHo, Little Italy and Chinatown Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Heights + DUMBO 3 Hour Lower Manhattan Harlem Chelsea and the High Line 6 Hour Downtown Combined Greenwich Village Central Park Lower Manhattan Midtown Manhattan Grand Central Terminal Graffiti and Street Art Tours World Trade Center    New York City, NY; NYC

Sat, Feb 23
10:00 am

to 7:00 pm

Free

Tours, February 23, 2019, 02/23/2019, 13 tours, all City neighborhoods, any time of the day, choose one tour or many
Lecture | New York City Food History - Industrial Foods and Factories
This class is an introduction to the food history of New York City, telling the stories of the edible goods produced, consumed, and venerated in homes and restaurants within the five boroughs. The history of restaurants, the meals of the wealthy and those of the working class, and the foodstuffs on all these plates will be explored. New York City is a city of immigrants, and these diverse groups from around the globe have contributed to a constantly evolving definition of urban food culture. The topic of the second week will be Industrial Foods and Factories. One of the economies most impacted by the industrial revolution in New York City was food production. The peak time for the production of industrial, or packaged, foods originating in NYC was 1860 – 1960. What foods were produced, where were they marketed and distributed? How did these nascent food industry giants such as Nabisco and Domino Sugar re-shape the physical geography of New York City as well as the contents of dinner plates? The Professor: Dr. Shayne Figueroa is a food historian and recently earned her PhD in Food Studies from New York University. Her dissertation examines the social history of the school lunch program in New York City during the postwar period. Shayne has taught undergraduate courses at NYU (Food Issues in Contemporary Society), The New School (Introduction to Food Studies; Kids and Food), and Sterling College.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sat, Feb 23
3:00 pm

Free

Lectures, February 23, 2019, 02/23/2019, New York City Food History - Industrial Foods and Factories
Classical Music | Orchestra Performs Music Inspired by Japan
Led by music director Chris Whittaker, Strings of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra come together to perform music inspired by Japan and Japanese-American composers. After the concert, Friends of WHCO enjoy a food and sake tasting courtesy of Tampopo Ramen. About the Program Kenji Bunch's Supermaximum opens the program -- a work inspired by the songs of Depression-era chain gangs in the American deep south. Next will be performed, Toru Takemitsu's Requiem, a piece from earlier in his career which launched him into prominence after the work was discovered by Igor Stravinsky. By the end of his life, Takemitsu had become one of the most unique voices and influential composers in both Japanese and western classical music. Japanese-American composer Karen Tanaka's Dreamscape follows -- a lush and imaginative work, featuring harp and violin solo. The concert concludes with Christopher Theofanidis' A Thousand Cranes, named from the Senbazuru legend that states if one crafts one thousand paper cranes his or her wish will be granted. The piece is inspired by the story of Sadako Sasaki, a young girl who died from leukemia after initially surviving the 1945 nuclear bomb detonation on Hiroshima. Sasaki began making cranes while in the hospital, and her story renewed a culture-wide interest in the practice. In 1958, a statue of Sadako holding a golden crane was unveiled in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial and installed in the Hiroshima Peace Park.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sat, Feb 23
3:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 23, 2019, 02/23/2019, Orchestra Performs Music Inspired by Japan
Opening Reception | Incubate: A Fantastical Installation
Shih Chieh Huang’s fantastical installation – in which an octopus-like creature, crafted from whirring and blinking electronics, kryptonite-colored goo, and plastic bags, waves comically – and sometimes suggestively. It’s an installation that poignantly confuses the wonder inspired by mysterious creatures and deep space with the mesmerizing effects of technology. Shih Chieh Huang, a Ted Fellow in 2014, has exhibited his sculptures and installations at the 55th Venice Biennial Glasstress, Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial Japan, Experimenta Biennial of Media Art Melbourne, Busan Biennial, Aichi Triennial Japan, 52nd Venice Biennial Taiwan Pavilion, Biennial Zero1 San Jose, Biennial Cuvée in Austria, the ARC Biennial Australia, and MOCA Shanghai.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sat, Feb 23
6:00 pm

to 8:00 pm

Free

Opening Receptions, February 23, 2019, 02/23/2019, Incubate: A Fantastical Installation

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Classical Music | Bach Vespers
George Christoph Bach's (1642-1697) Siehe, wie fein und lieblich ist’s Composer George Christoph Bach was the elder brother of Johann Sebastian Bach's father Johann Ambrosius Bach. His most well known work is Siehe, wie fein und lieblich ist es for two tenors, bass, violin, three gambas and continuo. It was composed on his 47th birthday and a visit to Schweinfurt by his two younger twin brothers. By the way, in the German town of Gotha, the name Bach was considered a synonym for musician...    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Feb 24
5:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 24, 2019, 02/24/2019, Bach Vespers
Opening Reception | Ification: Work Made on Flights
Nina Katchadourian's exhibition includes selections from her recent traveling museum retrospective Curiouser, organized by the Blanton Museum of Art. Central to the exhibition is an extensive ongoing body of work made in-flight on airplanes using only a cell phone and found materials. The exhibition is the first comprehensive showing of in New York.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Feb 24
6:00 pm

to 8:00 pm

Free

Opening Receptions, February 24, 2019, 02/24/2019, Ification: Work Made on Flights

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Classical Music | Works by Schoenberg and more
Third Sound, the New York-based collective of chamber music performers present an eclectic program of pieces spanning a century. Schoenberg’s masterwork, Chamber Symphony, Op. 9, anchors two more recent creations, including one by Third Sound Director Patrick Castillo. Performers: Sooyun Kim, flute; Romie de Guise-Langlois, clarinet; Karen Kim, violin; Michael Nicolas, cello; Orion Weiss, piano. Program Ingrid Arauco Fantasy-Quartet (2004) Patrick Castillo Music for Four (2017) Arnold Schoenberg Chamber Symphony, No. 1, Op. 9 (1906) Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Come early to guarantee your seats.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 26
6:00 pm

Free

Concerts, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Works by Schoenberg and more
Talk | Photographer Talk: Cultural Identity and Sense of Place
Haruka Sakaguchi’s documentary work focuses on cultural identity and sense of place, and has been published on The New York Times, Time, Open Society Foundations, British Journal of Photography, Burn Magazine, Rangefinder, and Buzzfeed. Presented by MPS Digital Photography as part of its i3: Images, Ideas, Inspiration lecture series. Haruka's recent project 1945 was on display at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo from November 2017 thru November 2018. She was born in Osaka, Japan and immigrated to the US with her parents when she was three months old.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 26
7:00 pm

Free

Talks, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Photographer Talk: Cultural Identity and Sense of Place
Author Reading | Dead Men's Trousers: The Latest from the Author of Trainspotting
A spectacular return of the wild, dissolute gang from Trainspotting, from the author Irvine Welsh, who the The New York Times called "Blisteringly funny.... " The gang from Trainspotting have mostly cleaned up their act ... until they are drawn back together to Scotland for one last scheme -- a scheme one of them won't survive. It's an action-packed, hilarious and rollicking trip, as well as a moving elegy to the crew. Mark Renton is finally a success. An international jet-setter, he now makes significant money managing DJs, but the constant travel, airport lounges, soulless hotel rooms and broken relationships have left him dissatisfied with his life. He's then rocked by a chance encounter with Frank Begbie, from whom he'd been hiding for years after a terrible betrayal and the resulting debt. But the psychotic Begbie appears to have reinvented himself as a celebrated artist and - much to Mark's astonishment - doesn't seem interested in revenge. Sick Boy and Spud, who have agendas of their own, are intrigued to learn that their old friends are back in town, but when they enter the bleak world of organ-harvesting, things start to go so badly wrong. Lurching from crisis to crisis, the four men circle each other, driven by their personal histories and addictions, confused, angry - so desperate that even Hibs winning the Scottish Cup doesn't really help. One of these four will not survive to the end of this book. Which one of them is wearing Dead Men's Trousers? Restrictions apply. Call store for details.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 26
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Dead Men's Trousers: The Latest from the Author of Trainspotting
Author Reading | Life Admin: How I Learned to Do Less, Do Better, and Live More
Life Admin will give you many hours of your life back. Every day an unseen form of labor creeps into our lives—stealing precious moments of free time, placing a strain on our schedules and our relationships, and earning neither appreciation nor compensation in return. This labor is life admin: the kind of secretarial and managerial work necessary to run a life and a household. Life Admin tackles the problem of admin in all its forms, from everyday tasks like scheduling doctors appointments and paying bills, to life-cycle events like planning a wedding, a birth, a funeral. Elizabeth Emens explores how this labor is created, how it affects our lives, and how we might avoid, reduce, and redistribute admin whenever possible—as individuals and as a society.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 26
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Life Admin: How I Learned to Do Less, Do Better, and Live More
Talk | A Conversation with Renowned Conductor Herbert Blomstedt
New York Philharmonic President and CEO Deborah Borda engages conductor Herbert Blomstedt in a conversation about the highlights of his career, spanning more than 60 years. Discover the convictions and ethos of one of the most estimable artists of our time prior to his concerts featuring masterworks by Grieg and Dvořák.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Feb 26
7:30 pm

Free

Talks, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, A Conversation with Renowned Conductor Herbert Blomstedt

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Film | Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor (1987): 9-Time Oscar Winner
The story of the final Emperor of China. Stars: John Lone, Joan Chen, Peter O'Toole 163 min.
   New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 27
6:00 pm

$5

Films, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor (1987): 9-Time Oscar Winner
Screening | Mom...I'm a Slayer: Coming Out in '90s Fantasy Television
Pose. Transparent. Vida. Each of these programs reflects the recent boom in creation of characters and plot lines that work to reflect the endless diversity of an intersectional LGBTQ+ community. Only two decades ago, queer and (even more rarely) trans characters were all but relegated to guest character arcs -- or they were gay, white, upwardly mobile and good for a laugh on Will and Grace. But another, subtler, and  historically pervasive type of queerness existed on American screens if one looked a little closer at the slayers, witches, and Amazonian warriors dominating primetime. This is a screening of Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s “Graduation Day Part II" and an evening of discussion surrounding Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Charmed, Xena: Warrior Princess, and much more as they take critical looks at the coming out metaphors couched in 1990s American fantasy television. Panelists Heather Hogan (Autostraddle) and Kristin Russo (Buffering the Vampire Slayer, Everyone is Gay) will lead a discussion on the ups and downs of changes in portrayals of queer and trans identities today, as well as the centuries-old tradition of literary and cinematic queer subtext and coding.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 27
6:00 pm

Free

Screenings, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Mom...I'm a Slayer: Coming Out in '90s Fantasy Television
Lecture | Dante Without Footnotes: Why Dante Is for Everyone
Why does Dante still speak to us with great urgency and power, and how is it that he remains accessible despite the seemingly-vast distance in time and culture between his world and ours? Lecturer Ron Herzman is Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at SUNY Geneseo and serves as the Director of Education and Outreach for the Dante Society of America. He has taught Dante at Geneseo, at Georgetown, and at Attica Correctional Facility, as well as directing fifteen Summer Seminars for School Teachers on Dante for the National Endowment for the Humanities.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Feb 27
6:30 pm

Free

Lectures, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Dante Without Footnotes: Why Dante Is for Everyone

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Film | Forbidden Games (1952): Classic French Cinema
A great classic film set during World War II: two children attempt to overcome the brutality of the surrounding world by creating a paradise of their own. Directed by René Clément 86 min.    New York City, NY; NYC

Thu, Feb 28
6:30 pm

Free

Films, February 28, 2019, 02/28/2019, Forbidden Games (1952): Classic French Cinema

Friday, March 1, 2019

Author Reading | We the Resistance: Documenting a History of Nonviolent Protest in the United States
Michael Long presents his new anthology, a first-person history of nonviolent resistance in the U.S., from pre-Revolutionary America to the Trump years. This alternate history of the formation of our nation—and its character—is one in which courageous individuals and movements have wielded the tools of nonviolence to resist unjust, unfair, and immoral policies and practices.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Mar 1
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, We the Resistance: Documenting a History of Nonviolent Protest in the United States

Monday, March 4, 2019

Talk | Songs of Bukovina: A Conversation with American Ballet Theatre's Alexei Ratmansky, former director of the Bolshoi Theater's Ballet
In celebration of Alexei Ratmansky’s 10th anniversary as American Ballet Theatre's Artist in Residence, ABT presents a special conversation with Ratmansky that will situate his famed piece, Songs of Bukovina, within its cultural and political contexts. Set to the music of Leonid Desyatnikov, Songs of Bukovina explores the folk traditions of the Eastern European mountains. Alexei Osipovich Ratmansky (Russian: Алексей Осипович Ратманский, born August 27, 1968 in Leningrad) was the director of the Bolshoi Theater's Ballet from 2004 to 2008.    New York City, NY; NYC

Mon, Mar 4
7:00 pm

Free

Talks, March 04, 2019, 03/04/2019, Songs of Bukovina: A Conversation with American Ballet Theatre's Alexei Ratmansky, former director of the Bolshoi Theater's Ballet

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Author Reading | Hungry Girl Simply 6: All-Natural Recipes with 6 Ingredients or Less
Thanks to bestselling author Lisa Lillien, eating healthy, delicious and satisfying foods has never been easier.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Mar 5
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, Hungry Girl Simply 6: All-Natural Recipes with 6 Ingredients or Less
Author Reading | They Fought Alone: The True Story of the Starr Brothers, British Secret Agents in Nazi-Occupied France
From Charles Glass, the bestselling author of Americans in Paris and The Deserters, comes the astounding story of Britain's Special Operations Executive, one of World War II's most important secret fighting forces. As far as the public knew, Britain's Special Operations Executive did not exist. After the defeat of the French Army and Britain's retreat from the Continent in June 1940, Prime Minister Winston Churchill created the top-secret espionage operation to "set Europe ablaze." The agents infiltrated Nazi-occupied territory, parachuting behind enemy lines and hiding in plain sight, quietly but forcefully recruiting, training, and arming local French résistants to attack the German war machine. SOE would not only change the course of the war, but the nature of combat itself. Of the many brave men and women conscripted, two Anglo-American recruits, the Starr brothers, stood out to become legendary figures to the guerillas, assassins, and saboteurs they led.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Mar 5
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, They Fought Alone: The True Story of the Starr Brothers, British Secret Agents in Nazi-Occupied France
Screening | Scenes Through the Cinema Lens: Happy Birthday, Nat King Cole
Born in March 1919, Nat King Cole had an especially intriguing career. Starting out as a rhythm and blues performer with a trickster’s manner, Cole crossed over to a white audience with “Straighten Up and Fly Right” in 1943 and then cemented his connection to white America with “The Christmas Song” (1946). See his appearances in several dramatic films as well as segments from The Nat King Cole Show (1956-57), the first series on network television to star an African-American performer.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Mar 5
7:30 pm

Free

Screenings, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, Scenes Through the Cinema Lens: Happy Birthday, Nat King Cole

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Discussion | Workers and Wages in America Today -- Featuring Nobel-Winning New York Times Columnist Paul Krugman
In this time of low unemployment, why is it so hard for American workers to make a living? Why haven’t the economy’s gains of the recent past meant higher wages for everyone? A panel of experts examines the power, or weakness, of the American worker—looking at factors such as features of U.S. markets, technology, globalization, gendered wage patterns, and the decline of unions. Featuring Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize–winning economist, New York Times columnist, and distinguished professor; Heidi Shierholz, senior economist and director of policy at The Economic Policy Institute; Arindrajit Dube, professor of economics at UMass Amherst; and others.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Mar 6
6:30 pm

Free

Discussions, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, Workers and Wages in America Today -- Featuring Nobel-Winning New York Times Columnist Paul Krugman

Friday, March 8, 2019

Author Reading | Unhappy Silences: Activist Feelings, Feminist Thinking, Resisting Injustice
Reading from her new book, Berenice Malka Fisher shares her own and other women activists’ stories about both speaking out and remaining silent in numerous peace and justice movements from the 1950s to the present. Through analyzing these accounts with the help of many feminist authors, she shows how closer attention to the feelings contained in these silent moments can strengthen collective resistance.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Mar 8
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, March 08, 2019, 03/08/2019, Unhappy Silences: Activist Feelings, Feminist Thinking, Resisting Injustice

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Classical Music | Works by Olivier Messiaen and more
Pianist Marilyn Nonken is known as “one of the greatest interpreters of new music” (American Record Guide), especially in her mastery and knowledge of the music of Tristan Murail, with whom she has closely collaborated. Here, she explores the relationship between teacher and student with works by Murail and his teacher Olivier Messiaen. Program Olivier Messiaen Regard du Fils sur le Fils from Vingt regards sur l'Enfant Jésus (1944) Olivier Messiaen Prélude No. 6, Cloches d'angoisse et larmes d'adieu (1929) Tristan Murail Les Travaux et les jours (2002) Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Come early to guarantee your seats.    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Mar 12
6:00 pm

Free

Concerts, March 12, 2019, 03/12/2019, Works by Olivier Messiaen and more

Friday, March 15, 2019

Concert | Pianist Who Performed with Musicians form New York Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic and more
Pianist Vanessa May-lok Lee has performed in recitals with Jörgen van Rijen (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra), Joseph Alessi (New York Philharmonic), Jesper Busk Sørensen (Berlin Philharmonic), Jeffrey Beecher (Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble; Toronto Symphony Orchestra), and Rachel Mercer (Ensemble Made in Canada) among others.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Mar 15
7:00 pm

Free

Concerts, March 15, 2019, 03/15/2019, Pianist Who Performed with Musicians form New York Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic and more

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Author Reading | Spending Time: The Most Valuable Resource
Time is the ultimate scarce resource and thus a topic for economics, which studies scarcity. Since our time is limited by the number of hours in a day, days in a year, and years in our lives, we face constraints and thus choices that involve trade-offs. Spending Time provides engaging insights into how people use their time and what determines their decisions. Daniel S. Hamermesh explores people’s use of their time across countries, regions, cultures, class, and gender to create a comprehensive study of time.    New York City, NY; NYC

Sun, Mar 17
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, March 17, 2019, 03/17/2019, Spending Time: The Most Valuable Resource

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Discussion | The Secret Sauce Behind Top Chef
For sixteen seasons, Bravo’s reality competition series Top Chef has been showcasing the best chefs across the country in culinary competitions that have entertained foodies everywhere. Hear from judges Tom Colicchio and Gail Simmons on what continues to make the show a success.      New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Mar 20
6:30 pm

Free

Discussions, March 20, 2019, 03/20/2019, The Secret Sauce Behind Top Chef
Screening | Sorry I Missed Your Show: Dance Screening and Discussion
Director and choreographer Camille A. Brown, and Founder of MoBBallet writer Theresa Ruth Howard discuss Brown’s navigation between sustaining her company, Camille A. Brown & Dancers, and having a career as a choreographer for theater. Works screened include the 3 installments from Brown’s trilogy, the Bessie Award-winning Mr. TOL E. RAncE, Bessie-nominated BLACK GIRL: Linguistic Play, and critically acclaimed ink, as well as Emmy Award-winning Jesus Christ Superstar Live on NBC and Tony Award-winning Once on this Island. A dance screening and discussion series, Sorry I Missed Your Show highlights dance works from the recent past to explore their canonical historicity and relationship to contemporary practice.    New York City, NY; NYC

Wed, Mar 20
6:30 pm

Free

Screenings, March 20, 2019, 03/20/2019, Sorry I Missed Your Show: Dance Screening and Discussion

Friday, March 22, 2019

Concert | Early Music Performed on Period Instruments
While The Queens Consort performs a wide variety of repertoire spanning many countries and time periods, they have a particular fondness for music of the Venetian baroque. Their instruments are: two baroque violins, baroque viola, harpsichord, baroque cello and two recordes. "The term ‘baroque’ has been widely used since the 19th century to describe the period in Western European art music from about 1600 to 1750... Many famous composers from the first part of the baroque period came from Italy and have a link with Venice, including Claudio Monteverdi and Antonio Vivaldi. Monteverdi was born in Cremona, but moved to Venice where he was ‘maestro di capella’ at the San Marco basilica. Vivaldi was born in Venice and was one of the greatest baroque composers. It is thanks to these strong musical traditions of Venice that we have today’s music. Without Venetian church music and Monteverdi’s advances with polyphony, the great traditions of choral music in England, France, and Germany would never have developed. Without the operas written by Monteverdi, Cavalli and Vivaldi, not only would the later styles of opera never have been invented. There would be no basis for the American Musical or the German and Viennese Operetta, the Spanish Zarzuela, and even rock, pop, and contemporary music as we know it.' The Venice Insider Recordings of one of The Queens Consort founding member, Violinist Claire Smith, include Shakira’s album, “She Wolf,” Ritchie Blackmore’s Night’s “Dancer and the Moon,” “Winter Carols,” “All Our Yesterdays,” and Candice Night’s “Starlight, Starbright.”    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Mar 22
7:00 pm

Free

Concerts, March 22, 2019, 03/22/2019, Early Music Performed on Period Instruments

Monday, March 25, 2019

Author Reading | Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance
Award-winning Native American funder Edgar Villanueva weaves a provocative analysis of the dysfunctional colonial dynamics at play in philanthropy and finance, and offers a prescription for restoring balance and healing our divides using the guidance of indigenous wisdom. Edgar Villanueva is a nationally-recognized expert on social justice philanthropy. Edgar currently serves as Chair of the Board of Directors of Native Americans in Philanthropy and is a Board Member of the Andrus Family Fund, a national foundation that works to improve outcomes for vulnerable youth.    New York City, NY; NYC

Mon, Mar 25
7:00 pm

Free

Author Readings, March 25, 2019, 03/25/2019, Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Classical Music | The Canadian Guitar Quartet: Romantic Impressions
The Canadian Guitar Quartet has performed a dynamic mix of original music and classical repertoire that has earned them a reputation as one of the finest guitar ensembles in the world. Join us for an evening of works by Beethoven, Brahms, Ravel, and more. "…fantastic, spirited playing and sheer inventiveness…” -- Classical Guitar Program Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897) Hungarian Dances 1, 4, 5 Camille Saint-Saëns (1835 - 1921) Danse Macabre Francis Poulenc (1899 - 1963) Sextet, FP 100 Patrick Roux Passion, Fougue, et Allegro Maurice Ravel (1875 - 1937) Quatuor à cordes en fa majeur Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827) String Quartet in C Major, op. 59, no. 3 Renaud Côté-Giguère Hommage à Brad Mehldau    New York City, NY; NYC

Tue, Mar 26
7:30 pm

to 9:30 pm

Free

Concerts, March 26, 2019, 03/26/2019, The Canadian Guitar Quartet: Romantic Impressions

Friday, March 29, 2019

Lecture | Why the New Cold War Is More Dangerous Than the One We Survived
Questionable but orthodox Cold War narratives make actual war with Russia more likely than at any time in the past forty years. Lecturer Stephen F. Cohen is a contributing editor at The Nation. He teaches at New York University and Princeton University    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, Mar 29
7:00 pm

Free

Lectures, March 29, 2019, 03/29/2019, Why the New Cold War Is More Dangerous Than the One We Survived

Friday, May 3, 2019

Lecture | Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam
Using newly available archival material from the Nixon Presidential Library, Kissinger's personal papers, and material from the archives in Vietnam, Robert K. Brigham, a specialist on the history of U.S. foreign policy, punctures the myth of Kissinger as an infallible mastermind. Instead, he constructs a portrait of a rash, opportunistic, and suggestible politician. It was personal political rivalries, the domestic political climate, and strategic confusion that drove Kissinger's actions. There was no great master plan or Bismarckian theory that supported how the US continued the war or conducted peace negotiations. Its length was doubled for nothing but ego and poor judgment. The American war in Vietnam was concluded in 1973 after eight years of fighting, bloodshed, and loss. Yet the terms of the truce that ended the war were effectively identical to what had been offered to the Nixon administration four years earlier. Those four years cost America and Vietnam thousands of lives and billions of dollars, and they were the direct result of the supposed master plan of the most important voice in American foreign policy: Henry Kissinger. Robert. K. Brigham is the Shirley Ecker Boskey Professor of History and International Relations at Vassar College. He is a specialist on the history of U.S. foreign policy. His fellowships include the Rockefeller Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for Humanities. Brigham is author or co-author of nine books, among them Iraq, Vietnam, and the Limits of American Power (PublicAffairs, 2008) and Argument Without End (PublicAffairs, 1999).    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, May 3
7:00 pm

Free

Lectures, May 03, 2019, 05/03/2019, Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam

Friday, May 24, 2019

Lecture | Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam
While most historians of the Vietnam War focus on the origins of U.S. involvement and the Americanization of the conflict, Lien-Hang T. Nguyen examines the international context in which North Vietnamese leaders pursued the war and American intervention ended. This riveting narrative takes the reader from the marshy swamps of the Mekong Delta to the bomb-saturated Red River Delta, from the corridors of power in Hanoi and Saigon to the Nixon White House, and from the peace negotiations in Paris to high-level meetings in Beijing and Moscow, all to reveal that peace never had a chance in Vietnam. Hanoi's War renders transparent the internal workings of America's most elusive enemy and shows that the war fought during the peace negotiations was bloodier and much more wide-ranging than it had been previously. Using never-before-seen archival materials from the Vietnam Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as materials from other archives around the world, Nguyen explores the politics of war-making and peace-making not only from the North Vietnamese perspective but also from that of South Vietnam, the Soviet Union, China, and the United States, presenting a uniquely international portrait. Lien-Hang T. Nguyen is the Dorothy Borg Associate Professor in the History of the United States and East Asia at Columbia University. She received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. from Yale University.    New York City, NY; NYC

Fri, May 24
7:00 pm

Free

Lectures, May 24, 2019, 05/24/2019, Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam
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