free things to do in New York City
Free events for Thursday, 10/06/22
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Free Events, Free Things to Do in New York City!  Read More

New York attracts world's best minds to its shores: they come here to interact with each other at conferences and seminars, and while they are here they are often invited to give a talk, a lecture, to be a part of a public discussion. We at Club Free Time give you an opportunity to be a part of it: to watch how those best minds in the world work! Don't miss the opportunities that only New York City (NYC) provides!

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170 free talks, lectures, discussions in New York City (NYC) Thu, 10/06/2022 - and on...

In New York City, you can talk with and listen to the best minds in the world without spending a dime! Just take a look at free talks, lectures, discussion, seminars, conferences listed on this page below!

        

Gallery Talk | Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered: Exhibition Walkthrough (online)


A virtual tour of Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered. This hour-long tour, led by AFAM Senior Educator Nicole Haroutunian, takes participants through the current exhibition to experience different perspectives of the works on view.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
1:00 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered: Exhibition Walkthrough (online)

Discussion | Documentary Director Discusses His Film on the Place of Humankind (online)


In Cyril Dion's Animal, the place of humankind among the living is the main subject of this documentary. Two teenager activists embark on an extraordinary quest to understand the impact of the ecological crisis and sixth mass extinction of the earth’s living species, and to find better ways for humans to cohabit more harmoniously alongside other animals. To do so, they travel and meet with scientists and activists all over the globe.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
2:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Documentary Director Discusses His Film on the Place of Humankind (online)

Book Discussion | The Battle Nearer to Home: The Persistence of School Segregation in New York (in-person and online)


Despite its image as an epicenter of progressive social policy, New York City continues to have one of the nation's most segregated school systems. Tracing the quest for integration in education from the mid-1950s to the present, Christopher Bonastia's book follows the tireless efforts by educational activists to dismantle the deep racial and socioeconomic inequalities that segregation reinforces. The fight for integration has shifted significantly over time, not least in terms of the way "integration" is conceived, from transfers of students and redrawing school attendance zones, to more recent demands of community control of segregated schools. In all cases, the Board eventually pulled the plug in the face of resistance from more powerful stakeholders, and, starting in the 1970s, integration receded as a possible solution to educational inequality. In excavating the history of New York City school integration politics, in the halls of power and on the ground, Christopher Bonastia unearths the enduring white resistance to integration and the severe costs paid by Black and Latino students. This last decade has seen activists renew the fight for integration, but the war is still far from won.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
4:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, The Battle Nearer to Home: The Persistence of School Segregation in New York (in-person and online)

Book Discussion | Paradoxes of Neoliberalism: Sex, Gender, and Possibilities for Justice


From the rise of far-right regimes to the tumult of the COVID-19 pandemic, recent years have brought global upheaval as well as the sedimentation of longstanding social inequalities. Analyzing the complexities of the current political moment in different geographic regions, this new book co-edited by Janet Jakobsen (Claire Tow Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) and Elizabeth Bernstein (Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Sociology) addresses the paradoxical persistence of neoliberal policies and practices, in order to ground the pursuit of a more just world. st).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Paradoxes of Neoliberalism: Sex, Gender, and Possibilities for Justice

Book Discussion | Shingle and Stone: Houses


Renowned architect Thomas Kligerman launches his full-career monograph surveying twenty years of iconic houses, with Mitchell Owens. The book will feature iconic Kligerman houses built over the past twenty years and current projects that demonstrate the evolution of his architectural thinking. This will be a “deep dive” into the design process, illustrated by sketches and renderings as well as finished photography.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Shingle and Stone: Houses

Book Discussion | The Return of Cultural Heritage in Latin America: Nationalism, Policy and Politics in Colombia, Mexico and Peru


Pierre Losson's book looks at recent case studies that have made headlines in the media: Colombia's claims for the "Quimbaya Treasure" and funerary statues from San Agustin; Mexico's attempts at recovering the famous "penacho de Moctezuma" and Teotihuacan murals; and Peru's successful claims for the Machu Picchu collection held at Yale and Paracas textiles held in Sweden. The author analyses how return claims contribute to the strengthening of state-sponsored discourses on the nation; the policy formation process that leads to the formulation of return claims; and who the main actors of the claims are, including civil society individuals, experts, state authorities, and Indigenous communities. The book proposes explanations for why Latin American countries are interested in these artefacts held in Western museums and why these claims have come to light over the past three decades.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, The Return of Cultural Heritage in Latin America: Nationalism, Policy and Politics in Colombia, Mexico and Peru

Talk | The Hispanic Legacy of the Panamanian National Costume


A presentation and sartorial display with live music focused on the cultural origins of Panama’s National Costume With live music.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:00 pm

Free
Talks, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, The Hispanic Legacy of the Panamanian National Costume

Lecture | The Natural and Built Environments of the U.S.-Mexico Border (in-person and online)


The political divide that separates the United States from Mexico passes through six different ecological regions. Each one of these “ecoregions” has a distinctive climate, specific configurations of plants and animals, and unique topography. The political border does not conform in any meaningful way to these environmental boundaries. The political divide does, however, commandeer two rivers -- the Colorado and the Rio Grande -- and for part of their lengths demands that they adhere to the predictability and fixity required of modern political borders. In his book Border Land, Border Water: A History of Construction on the U.S.-Mexico Divide, CJ Alvarez explains the border as a history of accretion, an ever-more complicated system of barrier infrastructure on land and hydraulic engineering projects on the rivers. Today, the environmental unity of border regions has been eclipsed by the built environment which has, in turn, impoverished our imaginations. But his current research and book project go beyond the built environment, deeper into time and further into the realms of the nonhuman world. This talk is about the relationship of political borders and environmental boundaries, the contrast between contemporary political developments and the multimillennial history of environmental regions and rivers, and the tension between anthropocentrism and ecocentrism.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, The Natural and Built Environments of the U.S.-Mexico Border (in-person and online)

Discussion | What's Prison For?: A Conversation with Bill Keller, Former Executive Editor of The New York Times (online)


America's prison system doesn't exactly have a reputation for empathy—but could that change? Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Bill Keller has spent years examining what is possible if prisons focus on preparing the incarcerated to be good citizens when they return to society, which the overwhelming majority will. In his new book, he shows us how we can reform our prisons and why there’s a reason for cautious optimism. Rehabilitation, he argues, is not only an investment in public safety but a moral imperative. This is a live conversation with Bill Keller, founding editor of The Marshall Project, former executive editor of The New York Times, and author of What’s Prison For? Punishment and Rehabilitation in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Moderator Jason D. Williamson, executive director of the Center on Race, Inequality and the Law at NYU School of Law, will guide the discussion on the complexity of the criminal justice system and explore Keller’s hope for more just and empathetic prisons.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 6
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, What's Prison For?: A Conversation with Bill Keller, Former Executive Editor of The New York Times (online)

Book Discussion | Poor Richard's Women: An Intimate Portrait of Benjamin Franklin (in-person and online)


Author Nancy Rubin Stuart reveals the long-neglected voices of the women Ben loved and lost during his lifelong struggle between passion and prudence. Weaving detailed historical research with emotional intensity and personal testimony, Nancy Rubin Stuart traces the life of Deborah Reed Franklin--Ben's common-law wife and partner of 44 years-- and those of Ben's other romantic attachments through their personal correspondence, giving an intimate look into the lives of these larger forgotten women.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 6
6:30 pm

$5 in-person...
Book Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Poor Richard's Women: An Intimate Portrait of Benjamin Franklin (in-person and online)

Discussion | Re-enchanting the World: An Exhibition Discussion


Titled Re-enchanting the World, the Polish pavilion at the 59th Venice Biennale is a manifesto on Roma identity and culture. Showcasing work by Małgorzata Mirga-Tas, the first Roma artist to ever be shown in a national pavilion, the exhibition draws inspiration from the Renaissance frescoes of the Palazzo Schifanoia in Ferrara, Italy to reinscribe a Roma perspective into art historical discourse. Through the patchwork tapestries that make up the show, the artist carries out—both physically and metaphorically—the work of repair, the craft of narrative, and the experience of Aby Warburg’s nachleben, or life after life of images. In this program, pavilion co-curator Joanna Warsza is joined by Ana Janevski, Curator, Department of Media and Performance, Museum of Modern Art, to discuss the concept of re-enchanting the world as realized in the Polish pavilion. The conversation examines the themes of interdependence, transnationality, and cyclicality that informed both Mirga-Tas’s exhibition and the curatorial process of bringing it to Venice. Warsza also offers a glimpse into her upcoming show and publication,
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Re-enchanting the World: An Exhibition Discussion

Lecture | Strangers in a Strange Land: Displacement, Sanctuary, and the Traveling Tale


Edward W. Said wrote that he habitually felt “out of place” and in his memoir movingly explores the strategies and theoretical ideas the experience inspired. Marina Warner will return to Said's ideas about estrangement, the traveling tale and contrapuntal reading, through a reading of the Flight into Egypt. The legend spread through stories, cult, and pilgrimage and Memories of Mary/Mariam in Egypt live on in some form in both the Christian and Islamic traditions. In a time of ever greater displacements and tumult, this narrative offers a test case of storytelling's role in living through exile and dislocation, and surviving somewhere that is not home. Marina Warner is a writer of fiction, cultural history, and criticism. Her study of the Arabian Nights, Stranger Magic (2011) won a National Book Critics Circle Award, the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism and a Sheikh Zayed Book Award; in 2015, she received the Holberg Prize in the Arts and Humanities. She contributes regularly to the London Review of Books, Raritan, and the New York Review of Books, and is Professor of English and Creative Writing at Birkbeck College and a Distinguished Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. Recent books include Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tale and Forms of Enchantment: Writings on Art and Artists. Inventory of a Life Mislaid: An Unreliable Memoir, about her childhood in Cairo, appeared in the US earlier this year under the title Esmond and Ilia (NYRB). She is working on a study of the concept of Sanctuary.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Strangers in a Strange Land: Displacement, Sanctuary, and the Traveling Tale

Book Discussion | Anna-Sophie Berger: life and limbs


The gallery becomes a mouth. It has four pointy teeth and is an aged, even sickly, shade of off-white. The teeth are walls, and on them hang artworks selected by Austrian artist Anna-Sophie Berger for the exhibition, Swiss Institute’s fourth installment of its Architecture and Design Series. Berger’s premise for the show considers the body an experimental testing ground for design, a living site that is both vulnerable and resilient. As the title implies, life and limbs exists in a world where the human body, unadorned, is at risk and often confronts threat with dark and knowing humor but also with grace. Across these works, which draw from speculative architectures, Surrealism, late twentieth-century fashion design, and Viennese Actionism, among many other subsects of modern visual culture, Berger’s singular understanding of corporeal awareness unfolds. In the clutches of this jaw, bodies find ways to disappear, though some stretch, reach, and metamorphosize in attempts to escape themselves. This book is a means to further explore Berger’s thesis. Three remarkable essays, by Annie Godfrey Larmon, Philipp Ekardt and Berger herself, ponder the works that populate this wunderkammer and question design’s transformative potential.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Anna-Sophie Berger: life and limbs

Discussion | Thoughts on Marriage, Family, a Life in Art and Social Justice, with 2-Time Pulitzer-Winning Playwright Lynn Nottage


This is a special event with Lynn Nottage, two-time Pulitzer-prize winning playwright and Tony Gerber, PGA and Emmy Award-winning film director as they discuss their lives together: making a home, making art, and making history. Moderated by College of Performing Arts faculty member and Director of Equity Inclusion and Social Justice, Dennis Hilton-Reid. Lynn Nottage and Tony Gerber met 36 years ago while students at Brown University. They have been married for 31 years and have two children, Ruby and Melkamu. Lynn Nottage is the recipient of numerous awards including two Pulitzer Prizes in Drama for her 2009 play Ruined and her 2017 play Sweat. This past spring, Lynn had an unprecedented three productions running concurrently on Broadway: Clyde’s at Second Stage Theater, MJ: The Musical at the Neil Simon Theatre, and Intimate Apparel at Lincoln Center Theater. She is an Associate Professor in the Theatre Department at Columbia School of the Arts and an artist-in-residence at the Park Avenue Armory. Tony Gerber is an Emmy and PGA award-winning filmmaker who has written, directed and produced over a dozen documentaries for National Geographic. He produced the critically acclaimed, award-winning film Jane about the life and work of Dr. Jane Goodall as well as the short documentary Takeover(Tribeca 2021) about a group of Puerto Rican activists, the Young Lords, who take over a decrepit hospital in the South Bronx launching a battle for their lives, their community, and healthcare for all.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 6
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 06, 2022, 10/06/2022, Thoughts on Marriage, Family, a Life in Art and Social Justice, with 2-Time Pulitzer-Winning Playwright Lynn Nottage

Symposium | ?Moda Hoy! Latin American Fashion


The symposium provides an opportunity for museum curators Tanya Melendez-Escalante and Melissa Marra-Alvarez to engage with the general public and the academic community in preparation for the upcoming exhibition of the same title slated to open in spring of 2023. By exploring the work of fashion designers of Latin American heritage, the symposium will shed new light on Latin American and Latinx fashion. Topics favored by these designers include politics, sustainability, art, Indigenous heritage, gender, and popular culture. Speakers include: William Cruz Bermeo, professor in the Clothing Design Program at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, in Medellin, Colombia; Mexican independent curator Ana Elena Mallet; and Hanayra Negreiros, Adjunct Curator of Fashion at the Museu de Arte de Sao Paulo; as well as designers, Willy Chavarria, Brenda Equihua, and Barbara Sanchez-Kane.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, Oct 7
10:00 am

Free
Symposiums, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, ?Moda Hoy! Latin American Fashion

Gallery Talk | Experimental Marriage: Women in Early Hollywood: Curatorial Tour


Collections Manager Melissa Walker leads a curatorial tour of the exhibition. Learn about the women who shaped the early silent film industry through lobby cards for movies written, directed, produced, art-directed, or edited by them. Questions strongly encouraged.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
1:00 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Experimental Marriage: Women in Early Hollywood: Curatorial Tour

Conference | Future Forum: Fabricating the Future


Interested in fashion sustainability and want to learn about what textile innovations are happening on both sides of the Atlantic? This event is for you. It brings together German and American designers, researchers, and entrepreneurs to discuss the future of sustainable fashion including fashion policy, biomaterials, and fashion and costume design. Isabel Slone - Journalist and Critic, New York Times, Harper's Bazaar, ELLE Gwyn Conaway - Costume Concept Artist, Costume Designers Guild IATSE 892 Barbro Scholz - E-textiles Designer-Researcher, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences / StühmerScholz Design Natascha von Hirschhausen - Zero-Waste Fashion Designer Matthias Finkbeiner - Chair of Sustainable Engineering, Technical University Berlin  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
1:30 pm

Free
Conferences, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Future Forum: Fabricating the Future

Symposium | Identity Reimagined: Reframing La Colección


A special symposium dedicated to new scholarship that rethinks the critical histories that have shaped the Museum’s Permanent Collection. Together, we will contextualize the museum’s unique intersection of art, activism, and Latinx culture, with specific emphasis on its founding Nuyorican community.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
1:30 pm

Free
Symposiums, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Identity Reimagined: Reframing La Colecci&oacute;n

Symposium | Identity Reimagined: Reframing La Coleccion (online)


A special symposium dedicated to new scholarship that rethinks the critical histories that have shaped the Museum's Permanent Collection. it will contextualize the museum's unique intersection of art, activism, and Latinx culture, with specific emphasis on its founding Nuyorican community.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
1:30 pm

Free
Symposiums, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Identity Reimagined: Reframing La Coleccion (online)

Discussion | Trust in Science (online)


The panel conversation focuses on higher education science pedagogy and how different approaches to teaching science have the potential to instill/foster trust in the scientific process. A college science class may be one of the last times many students who are not planning to pursue careers in STEM-related fields will participate in organized science education. Yet, this does not mean they never have to interact with science again. The panelists will discuss how to promote scientific literacy in higher education to provide students with the tools to make evidence-based decisions about the health and environmental issues they will face outside of the classroom in the communities in which they live and work.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
2:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Trust in Science (online)

Book Discussion | Michael De Fao: Out of Fashion


Artist Michael De Feo in conversation with curator RJ Rushmore on the new book Out of Fashion. This publication explores De Feo’s flower paintings created directly on fashion advertising posters removed from bus shelters. Learn more about the artist’s approach and process during this wide-ranging conversation. Questions strongly encouraged.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
3:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Michael De Fao: Out of Fashion

Gallery Talk | Masked Vigilantes on Silent Motorbikes: Curatorial Tour


Curator RJ Rushmore leads a curatorial tour the contemporary art exhibition. Learn how the artists like Swoon, KAWS, Jilly Ballistic and more use posters as a medium from which to create entirely new works of art, repurposing the language of mass communication. Discover how advertising shapes our built environment and how artists leverage sanctioned and unsanctioned public art to disrupt what is commonplace.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
6:00 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Masked Vigilantes on Silent Motorbikes: Curatorial Tour

Book Discussion | The Hundred Waters: A New Novel from Pulitzer Winner Michael Cunningham


Formerly a model and photographer trying to make it in New York, Louisa Rader is back in her affluent hometown of Nearwater, Connecticut, where she’s married to a successful older architect, raising a preteen daughter, and trying to vitalize the provincial local art center. As the years pass, she’s grown restless in her safe and comfortable routine, haunted by the flash of the life she used to live. When intense and intriguing young artist-environmentalist Gabriel arrives in town with his aristocratic family, his impact on the Raders has hothouse effects. As Gabriel pushes to realize his artistic vision for the world, he pulls both Louisa and her daughter Sylvie under his spell, with consequences that disrupt the Raders’ world forever. A strange, sexy, and sinister novel of art and obsession, in The Hundred Waters Acampora gives us an incisive, page-turning story of ambition, despair, desire, and the pursuit of fulfillment and freedom at all costs.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, The Hundred Waters: A New Novel from Pulitzer Winner Michael Cunningham

Book Discussion | Paul Laurence Dunbar: The Life and Times of a Caged Bird (online)


A major poet, Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906) was one of the first African American writers to garner international recognition in the wake of emancipation. In this definitive biography, the first full-scale life of Dunbar in half a century, Gene Andrew Jarrett offers a revelatory account of a writer whose Gilded Age celebrity as the "poet laureate of his race" hid the private struggles of a man who, in the words of his famous poem, felt like a "caged bird" that sings. Author Gene Andrew Jarrett is Dean of the Faculty and William S. Tod Professor of English at Princeton University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, Paul Laurence Dunbar: The Life and Times of a Caged Bird (online)

Lecture | An Invincible Beast: Understanding the Hellenistic Pike Phalanx in Action (online)


With: Professor Christopher Matthew, Lecturer in Ancient History, Australian Catholic University. The Hellenistic pike-phalanx was a true military innovation, transforming the face of warfare in the ancient world. For nearly 200 years, from the rise of the Macedonians as a military power in the mid-fourth century BC, to their defeat at the hands of the Romans at Pydna in 168BC, the pike-wielding heavy infantryman (the phalangite) formed the basis of nearly every Hellenistic army to deploy on battlefields stretching from Italy to India. And yet, despite this dominance, and the vast literature dedicated to detailing the history of the Hellenistic world, there remains fierce debate among modern scholars about how infantry combat in this age was actually conducted. Christopher Matthews critically examines phalanx combat by using techniques such as physical re-creation, experimental archaeology, and ballistics testing, and then comparing the findings of this testing to the ancient literary, artistic and archaeological evidence, as well as modern theories. The result is the most comprehensive and up-to-date study of what heavy infantry combat was like in the age of Alexander the Great and his successors.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 7
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 07, 2022, 10/07/2022, An Invincible Beast: Understanding the Hellenistic Pike Phalanx in Action (online)

Gallery Talk | American Travelers: A Watercolor Journey Through Spain, Portugal, and Mexico: Exhibition Tour


Docent-led gallery tour of current exhibition that shares the large collection of watercolors by United States artists painted in Spain, Portugal, and Latin America. Works by Hassam, Kuehne, Edwards, Peixotto, Robinson, Peets, and Petrovic are presented in conjunction with a suite of recent watercolor paintings by Timothy J. Clark. Saturdays, July 23-October 15, 2022
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Oct 8
1:00 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, October 08, 2022, 10/08/2022, American Travelers: A Watercolor Journey Through Spain, Portugal, and Mexico: Exhibition Tour

Discussion | In Situ: Places (and Material) with a Past


During a time of transition, when the National Academy is between exhibition spaces for the first time in many decades, organizing shows has required creativity and collaboration with other organizations and venues. Questions of sustainability, ephemerality, reuse, and regeneration become more prominent, as reflected in our Governors Island exhibition, Materia/Material. This is a conversation about what it means to make work in a historic site, to create works of art with materials that carry their own histories of reuse, and how the curatorial process is shaped by these conditions, with architect Stephanie Lin; artist Jim Osman; Klaudia Ofwona Draber, Founder and President, KODA; and Tara Sansone, Executive Director, Materials for the Arts, Klaudia Ofwona Draber, Founder and President, KODA and moderated by Sara Reisman, National Academy of Design Chief Curator/Director.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Sat, Oct 8
1:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 08, 2022, 10/08/2022, In Situ: Places (and Material) with a Past

Discussion | Poet Laureate of Southern Jews: Personal Remembrances of Eli Evans (online)


A panel of Eli Evans’ colleagues, friends and family remember the man whose passion for southern Jewish history provided a legacy that has thrived for five decades. The panelists will bring their own perspective to the discussion about their colleague, their friend, their father.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sun, Oct 9
4:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 09, 2022, 10/09/2022, Poet Laureate of Southern Jews: Personal Remembrances of Eli Evans (online)

Lecture | Models as Ethical Agents (in-person and online)


The claim argued in this lecture is that a model is an agent, like a chemical agent, that has effects on proximate things in the world. Because those effects can be good or bad, a model's ethical behavior, like that of a human, should always be subject to judgment. The case is made on the basis of an investigation of model prisons. A discussion following the lecture will be moderated by Sylvia Lavin. This event is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Model Behavior. Speaker Annabel Jane Wharton, William B. Hamilton Professor of Art History, Duke University, received her Ph.D. at the Courtauld Institute, London University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 10
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, October 10, 2022, 10/10/2022, Models as Ethical Agents (in-person and online)

Discussion | Fear and Sensitivity in Large-Scale Exhibitions (online)


Addressing some of the polarizing debates we’ve seen this summer around large exhibitions such as documenta fifteen and the Berlin Biennale, curator Maria Lind, art historian and critic Terry Smith, curator Claire Tancons and Anselm Franke, head of Visual Art and Film at HKW in Berlin, look toward the future to ask if there are lessons to be learned for curators.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
12:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Fear and Sensitivity in Large-Scale Exhibitions (online)

Discussion | Narrating the War Everydayness (in-person and online)


A presentation by Natalia Otrishchenko. Moderated by Mark Andryczyk. In early March 2022, the Center for Urban History and colleagues from Poland, the UK, and Luxembourg started to discuss the possibility of ethically well-grounded and methodologically reasonable emergency collecting and archiving of oral testimonies of Ukrainian refugees, IDPs, and volunteers. During the presentation, Otrishchenko will describe multiple decisions we made in this project concerning interactions within the team, sensitivity of recruitment, trauma-informed interviewing, and ethical preservation of collected storie
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 11
12:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Narrating the War Everydayness (in-person and online)

Lecture | The Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative (online)


In June 2021, Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announced the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative, a comprehensive effort to recognize the troubled legacy of federal Indian boarding school policies, with the goal of addressing their intergenerational impact and to shed light on the traumas of the past. The federal Indian boarding school policies introduced a new architecture and program to American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this program, Joaquin Gallegos, Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs at the US Department of Interior, will summarize the findings of this extensive and first-ever inventory of federally operated Indian boarding schools.   
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
1:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, The Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative (online)

Lecture | When Government is Opaque: Empire State Development and the Penn Station Redevelopment Project (in-person and online)


A lecture by Elizabeth M. Marcello, a Senior Research Analyst at Reinvent Albany, a nonpartisan nonprofit organization that advocates for transparent and accountable New York State government. At Reinvent Albany, Mercello advocates for laws that curb business subsidies, improve open data and the Freedom of Information Law, and implement anti-corruption reforms. Her academic research focuses on city-state relations, economic development, and governance. Transparency and accountability are basic tenets of democracy. Public planners extol the open manner in which plans are developed and implemented; the government provides information, the public is consulted, and plans change and adapt based on public input. This, of course, does not always happen. When carried out by public authorities, plans are not subject to the same disclosure and accountability rules as when carried out by typical governmental agencies. Public authorities are a type of special purpose government that can supplement routine government functions by building infrastructure, maintaining bridges, building stadiums and convention centers, managing public housing, and running mass transit systems. These entities were created during the Progressive Era to isolate planning from politics and allow planning expertise to flourish, but does their use help or hurt democratic planning efforts? Using the ongoing case of the New York Empire State Development Corporation’s Penn Station Redevelopment project in Manhattan, Marcello shows how public authorities operate outside of legislative politics and move projects quickly from concept to completion. Potential reforms are offered as solutions to the many challenges that public authorities pose to democratic planning efforts.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
1:15 pm

Free
Lectures, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, When Government is Opaque: Empire State Development and the Penn Station Redevelopment Project (in-person and online)

Lecture | Environmental Threats to Continuity: Colonialism, Climate Migration and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (online)


Lauren Grant's lecture situates the current crisis of climate migration within the genealogies of coloniality and historicizes the making of the climate crisis, as it is tied to colonialism, dispossession, displacement, expropriation and the never-ending quest for capital by Euro-American colonial powers. Lauren Grant spearheads geographical and thematic research and reporting on climate migration at Earth Refuge. She develops connections and partnerships with research practitioners, institutes and projects that contribute to Earth Refuge’s reports and other research. Lauren represents the up and coming generation of advocates and researchers in the fields of climate migration, women’s, Indigenous and minority rights, violence, conflict, genocide and development.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
5:00 pm

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Lectures, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Environmental Threats to Continuity: Colonialism, Climate Migration and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (online)

Discussion | Out in Politics (in-person and online)


In the 2020 election, more openly LGBTQ people ran for elected office than ever before in the history of the country. According to the Victory Fund, a national organization dedicated to electing LGBTQ leaders, the election included 1,006 openly LGBTQ candidates. Alongside this history-making surge in LGBTQ representation has come a spike across the nation in anti-LGBTQ legislation, according to advocates. This has included Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” law and other laws targeting access to gender-affirming care. Bringing together openly LGBTQ people who have run, are running, or already serving in elected or appointed office in New York, as well as leading advocates and experts, this conversation will examine the challenges and opportunities that come with being “out”—both on the campaign trail and in office—amid heightened discrimination and violence toward the LGBTQ community.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
5:00 pm

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Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Out in Politics (in-person and online)

Gallery Talk | Air India's Maharaja: Advertising Gone Rogue: Curator's Tour (online)


Curators Carly Johnson and Sophia Williamson lead a virtual curatorial tour of Poster House’s latest exhibition. Discover the enduring and occasionally contentious travel posters of India’s national airline while learning about the Maharaja’s trajectory from a humble inflight memo pad to that of a cherished mascot. You’ll also enjoy the many guises of the Maharaja, from a monk in Rome to a lover boy in Paris, and even a Playboy bunny in New York.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:00 pm

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Gallery Talks, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Air India's Maharaja: Advertising Gone Rogue: Curator's Tour (online)

Book Discussion | The Betrothed: A Modern Italian Classic


The timeless masterpiece from Alessandro Manzoni, the father of modern Italian literature, in the first new English-language translation in fifty years, hailed as "a landmark literary occasion" by Jhumpa Lahiri in her preface to the edition. The Betrothed is a cornerstone of Italian culture, language, and literature. Published in its final form in 1842, the novel has inspired generations of Italian readers and writers. Giuseppe Verdi composed his majestic Requiem Mass in honor of Manzoni. Italo Calvino called the novel "a classic that has never ceased shaping reality in Italy" while Umberto Eco praised its author as a "most subtle critic and analyst of languages." The Betrothed has been celebrated by Primo Levi and Natalia Ginzburg, and is one of Pope Francis's favorite books. But, until now, it has remained relatively unknown to English readers. In the fall of 1628, two young lovers are forced to flee their village on the shores of Lake Como after a powerful lord prevents their marriage, plunging them into the maelstrom of history. Manzoni draws on actual people and events to create an unforgettable fresco of Italian life and society. In this greatest of historical novels, he takes the reader on a journey through the Spanish occupation of Milan, the ravages of war, class tensions, social injustice, religious faith, and a plague that devastates northern Italy. But within Manzoni's epic tale, readers will also hear powerful echoes of our own day.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 11
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, The Betrothed: A Modern Italian Classic

Discussion | Critical Lens: How a Jobs Program Put New York Artists to Work (in-person and online)


A panel discussion spotlighting the Municipal Archives' CETA Artists Project collection, as well as the history and significance of the federal Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) jobs program (1973-1981). CETA employed over 10,000 artists and cultural workers across the nation, and funded artist projects for 600 NYC visual artists, poets, dancers, performers, and photographers, among many other specialists in connection with New York area schools, libraries, museums, nursing homes, prisons, and more. Learn about this often forgotten yet critical history and hear City Lore, Artists Alliance Inc., and Cultural Council Foundation CETA alumni - including members of the Documentation Unit - discuss CETA's legacy. Discover how CETA's employment of artists serves as a precedent for envisioning how we can create sustained investment in artists today, permanently infusing the creativity and resourcefulness of artists into our workforce. Note: if you are interested in attending this event in person, please RSVP for this event. All attendees will be contacted via email to determine whether they would like to be a part of the in-person audience. .
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:00 pm

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Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Critical Lens: How a Jobs Program Put New York Artists to Work (in-person and online)

Lecture | Two Views of Universal Suffrage: Anticolonial and Neoliberal


In this event, Kevin Duong will reconstruct the terror early neoliberal thinkers experienced in the face of the tremendous suffrage expansions sweeping the British and French empires after the 1940s. He argues that such terrors incited neoliberals to an alternative theory of universal suffrage. Against “one person, one vote” which would empower enfranchised majorities to restructure national economies in the name of postcolonial socialist planning, neoliberals offered their own economized alternative: “every penny represents a ballot.” In this neoliberal vision of universal suffrage, the enfranchised citizen better expressed their voice, not at the ballot box, but through the consumption of services and goods. Two unexpected results emerged. The first involved a deeper mutation in democratic theory. Where universal suffrage was once expected to enunciate the political "voice of the people,” by the 1960s and 1970s universal suffrage became increasingly understood in non-sovereign market terms: as an information processing system capable of aggregating and coordinating individual preferences without a dangerous “voice of the people” emerging. The second unexpected result followed: African economic developmentalism, because democratically authorized by a mass political franchise, became the bête noire of Cold War liberal anxieties about “totalitarian” popular sovereignty.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:00 pm

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Lectures, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Two Views of Universal Suffrage: Anticolonial and Neoliberal

Discussion | “Immigration Will Destroy Us”: Understanding Xenophobia Past and Present (online)


A critical conversation on understanding anti-immigrant ideas, past and present. Through new research from Define American, examining the anti-immigration content network on YouTube, we’ll examine the myths and media of anti-immigrant messaging. How do today’s trends compare to the past? Why does this matter, and what can be done? Shauna Siggelkow, Director of Digital Storytelling at Define American will share their newest report, with context and discussion from historian Dr. Erika Lee, author of America for Americans, and Kathryn Lloyd, Vice President of Programs and Interpretation at the Tenement Museum. . 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:30 pm

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Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, &ldquo;Immigration Will Destroy Us&rdquo;: Understanding Xenophobia Past and Present (online)

Book Discussion | Emotional Justice: A Roadmap for Racial Healing


Author Esther Armah argues that the crucial missing piece to racial healing and sustainable equity is emotional justice—a new racial healing language to help us do our emotional work. This work is part of the emotional reckoning we must navigate if racial healing is to be more than a dream. We all—white, Black, Brown—have our emotional work that we need to do. But that work is not the same for all of us.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Emotional Justice: A Roadmap for Racial Healing

Book Discussion | Morganthau: Power, Privilege and the Rise of an American Dynasty (in-person and online)


Andrew Meier's "epic and intimate" portrait of four generations of the Morgenthau family, a dynasty of power brokers and public officials with an outsize--and previously unmapped--influence extending from daily life in New York City to the shaping of the American Century
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Morganthau: Power, Privilege and the Rise of an American Dynasty (in-person and online)

Discussion | Struggles Over the Narcotic City: Histories of Drug-Policing Since the 70s


On both sides of the Atlantic, drug use is a highly contested issue in urban public space. During this roundtable, participants will discuss and analyze the medical, political, and spatial aspects of governing intoxicating substances in New York, Berlin, Amsterdam, and beyond. How have conflicts around public drug use impacted the social and cultural fabric of cities in the late 20th and early 21st centuries? How are urban policies intertwined with addiction treatment and police interventions of contested sites? For this roundtable, they will bring together experts from the US and Europe, to explore the ways in which particular user groups (such as ethnic minorities) have been targeted or treated differently, and assess the impact of drug policy strategies on the wellbeing of users. Are there noticeable differences or similarities between US and European strategies and approaches? Furthermore, what kind of opposition and activism have they generated? How does the governance of drug use play into forms of urban exclusion, marginalization, and integration - particularly in relation to issues of gender, class, race, and disability? Roundtable with inputs by Gemma Blok (Open University, Netherlands), Samuel K. Roberts (Columbia University, New York), Matthew Vaz (CUNY, New York), Frederieke Westerheide (Halle University Halle). Moderation: Stefan Hohne (KWI Essen). The roundtable format will allow the audience and panelists to exchange ideas and experiences in an informal setting - sitting around a large table.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
6:30 pm

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Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Struggles Over the Narcotic City: Histories of Drug-Policing Since the 70s

Book Discussion | The Confessions of Matthew Strong: Racist on a Rampage (online)


In Ousmane K. Power-Greene's thought-provoking and suspenseful tale, Allegra Douglass is finally ready to tell her version of what happened with a white supremacist named Matthew Strong. From the beginning, Allie had the clues—found in possibly-connected disappearances of other young Black women; in a series of recently restored plantation homes; in letters outlining an uprising; in maps of slave trade routes and old estates; in hidden caves and buried tunnels; in a confessional that should never have existed—and then Allie herself disappears.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, The Confessions of Matthew Strong: Racist on a Rampage (online)

Book Discussion | Award-Winning Author Malaka Gharib on her New Novel About Identity, Belonging, Family (online)


Join a conversation with Malaka Gharib, the award-winning author of I Was Their American Dream and NPR editor, to discuss her latest work It Won't Always Be Like This. A chronicle of growing up with her Egyptian father’s new family, forging unexpected bonds and navigating adolescence in an unfamiliar country, It Won't Always Be Like This is a touching time capsule of Gharib’s childhood memories—each summer a fleeting moment in time—and a powerful reflection on relationships, values, family, and what happens when it all collides. Malaka will be joined by freelance journalist and fellow author Hannah Bae for a discussion on the power of identity and belonging. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Award-Winning Author Malaka Gharib on her New Novel About Identity, Belonging, Family (online)

Talk | Winner of The New York Times Magazine Photography Contest


A talk with Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao, a Taiwanese photographer who immigrated to the U.S. at the age of 22 in 1999. Liao first received recognition with his series Habitat 7, which was featured in the September 11, 2005, issue of The New York Times Magazine as the winner of Capture the Times photography contest. Liao’s work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and can be found in the permanent collections of several institutions.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 11
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, October 11, 2022, 10/11/2022, Winner of The New York Times Magazine Photography Contest

Book Discussion | Paradise Found: An Erotic Treasury for Sybarites


For those who desire to expand their amorous repertoire and a lush visual complement to the groundbreaking Boudoir Bible. A celebrated pioneer in the field of sexology and erotic design, Vernon unlocks the secrets of the sensual realm, taking us on a visual journey to a sexual paradise. This enlightening, luxurious tome features Vernon's renowned "jewel-tools"--artisanal erotic jewelry and instruments of ecstasy of her own design coveted by collectors around the world--alongside extensive advice on their use to reach new levels of pleasure. With Betony Vernon.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Oct 12
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 12, 2022, 10/12/2022, Paradise Found: An Erotic Treasury for Sybarites

Talk | Artist Talk: Design on Topography (online)


Welcome graphic and typeface designer Shiva Nallaperumal for a Genius on Display artist’s talk. Explore the talented designer’s amazing portfolio featuring work for a wide range of clients, including The New York Times, the NBA, and many more. Learn all about Nallaperumal’s unique approach to design and typography. Questions strongly encouraged!  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 12
6:00 pm

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Talks, October 12, 2022, 10/12/2022, Artist Talk: Design on Topography (online)

Discussion | Great Expectations: Films as Cultural Mediators Between East Germany and the U.S.


A conversation between the independent film curator Tobias Hering and Mariana Ivanova, Academic Director of the DEFA Film Library. The first larger showcase of films from East Germany in the U.S.A. took place only after diplomatic relations had officially been established between the two countries in 1974. Yet various forms of film relations had already existed since the 1950s, on a personal as well as on an institutional level. Such relations fed on the motivation and perseverance of individuals on both sides of the Iron Curtain and required finesse and mettle in skirting the demarcations of official politics. In this conversation, Mariana Ivanova and Tobias Hering will discuss their ongoing study of the GDR's international film relations. What made West German film producers Erich Mehl and Manfred Durniok, German-Jewish emigre Marta Feuchtwanger, American film historian Jay Leyda, or renegade filmmaker Emile de Antonio turn against the odds of Cold War politics and become what could be called cultural mediators?
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Oct 12
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 12, 2022, 10/12/2022, Great Expectations: Films as Cultural Mediators Between East Germany and the U.S.

Discussion | Art, Resistance, and New Narratives in Response to the War in Ukraine


In this evening of presentations and conversations, artists, researchers, and curators will delve deeply into artistic responses to the war in Ukraine, looking at the period between the Maidan revolution—which was followed by the annexation of Crimea and the occupation of Donbas in 2014—and the full-scale Russian invasion launched on February 24, 2022. Artists in Ukraine have long been reacting to the war. However, their voices seem only to have been amplified when the recent, brutal invasion started. Art created during the past eight years, and these very recent reactions, are already creating a future archive of the present that both documents the atrocities and proposes new narratives of art history.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 12
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, October 12, 2022, 10/12/2022, Art, Resistance, and New Narratives in Response to the War in Ukraine

Book Discussion | Before All the World: Three Love Stories in One


Moriel Rothman-Zecher on his mesmerizing, inventive new novel. In 1930s Philadelphia, three souls seize new life while haunted by the old. Nestled in this wild dream of a narrative are several love stories: two men of different countries and races who find comfort in each other; a man and a woman who spark each other’s lust through intellectual play; a woman and a boy who are the only survivors of their history; a man and the daughter he will never know. Rothman-Zecher explores the impossibility of escaping trauma, the necessity of believing in a better way ahead, and the power that comes from our responsibility to the future.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 12
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 12, 2022, 10/12/2022, Before All the World: Three Love Stories in One

Discussion | Politics of Gender in Work and Innovation in India and China (online)


Drawing on ethnographic research of design practices in post-liberalization India, Prof. Lilly Irani traces how designers target everyday acts of social reproduction as sites of intervention and valorization through design intervention. She makes the case with stories of water cooling, contrasting devalued water cooling practices characterized as jugaad or workaround with proper, branded products recognizable as innovation. Prof. Yige Dong draws on a case study of Zhengzhou, a city located in China’s heartland that has transformed from a major textile mill town in the socialist period to the world largest iPhone manufacturing center in the last decade. Extending the analytical focus from the factory shop floor to the space of social reproduction, this talk discusses how dynamics in the realm of gender and care work has constituted the processes of political economy and shaped the outcomes of China’s industrial development.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
10:00 am

Free
Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Politics of Gender in Work and Innovation in India and China (online)

Talk | Brazilian Presidential Election 2022: Trends and Major Aspects


Dr. Murillo de Aragão will address the progress of the presidential elections and their trends towards the second round, electoral platforms, Brazil-United States relations, reforms, human rights and environment, among other topics.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
12:00 pm

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Talks, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Brazilian Presidential Election 2022: Trends and Major Aspects

Lecture | Yesterday's Tomorrows: Identity and Space Technology in Post-Soviet Societies (online)


When considering the Russian aggression against Ukraine and expansion into its territory, the space legacy of the Soviet Union in Eurasia may not be the first thing that comes to mind. However, Nelly Bekus has argued that for states like Kazakhstan the ability to adopt and adapt the technical achievements and artifacts of that era have been an important means of establishing new national identities in the wake of the USSR.  In this talk, Dr. Bekus will discuss her studies of the cultivation of post-Soviet identities as a form of post-coloniality and the role that technoscientific enterprises like space exploration and travel have played in those efforts. She will also consider the impact of the expansionist actions of Russia, its expressed intentions to withdraw from established international relations involving space, and how those affect the geopolitics and identities of post-Soviet nations which have invested in using space for political purposes.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
12:00 pm

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Lectures, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Yesterday's Tomorrows: Identity and Space Technology in Post-Soviet Societies (online)

Book Discussion | Love Brought Me Through The Holocaust: A Daughter's Memories (online)


Judith Koeppel Steel was born in Berlin, Germany at the beginning of World War II. Her family escaped Germany in 1939 aboard the MS St. Louis, only to be turned away by both Cuba and the United States and sent back to Europe. Her family disembarked in Belgium, and were later imprisoned in Gurs concentration camp. Judith's father arranged for her to be hidden by a French Catholic family for the rest of the war. In 1946, Judith came to New York where she was adopted by her aunt and uncle. Ultimately, she was ordained as a Cantor. Join the Museum for a Stories Survive program in which Judith will discuss her story, as told in her book Love Brought Me Through The Holocaust: A Daughter's Memories.    
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
2:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Love Brought Me Through The Holocaust: A Daughter's Memories&nbsp;(online)

Lecture | The Silver Waterfall. How America Won the War in the Pacific at Midway (online)


With: Steven McGregor, Lecturer at INSTEP, Wake Forest University
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
3:00 pm

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Lectures, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, The Silver Waterfall. How America Won the War in the Pacific at Midway (online)

Book Discussion | Mott Street: A Chinese American Family's Story of Exclusion and Homecoming (online)


Ava Chin will address the challenges faced in writing her forthcoming memoir – challenges which included the impact of the Chinese Exclusion laws on four generations of her family in NYC’s Chinatown, and the task of how to thread a narrative together where the historical scope includes many eras and generations. How does one write a nonfiction book when the official record is a kind of fiction, heavily biased against one's subjects, or simply nonexistent due to negligence, discrimination, or a combination of both? How does the author weave nearly five decades of research into a single narrative? What are the criteria for inclusions and exclusions?
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
4:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Mott Street: A Chinese American Family's Story of Exclusion and Homecoming (online)

Lecture | A Politics of Radical Care: Writing Women into the History of the Egyptian Human Rights Movement (in-person and online)


Human Rights are a key theme in international history and international law, with the Arab world being studied mostly in relation to the trajectories that led the postcolonial states to ratify the major HR international conventions, and to the global growth of the human rights movements in the 1980s and the 1990s. In the mainstream literature, Arab women are either absent or represented as violated and vulnerable subjects, individuals in need of protection and “international solidarity”. Even the history of the human rights movements across the Arab world is written along male-centred genealogies, and women’s voices tend to be silenced. This talk argues for the importance of writing a women’s history of the human rights movement in Egypt, showing that woman political activists were not only closely working with men to build the movement, but they were also bringing a specific feminist theoretical contribution to it. Speaker Lucia Sorbera is Senior Lecturer and Chair of the Department of Arabic Language and Cultures at the University of Sydney, which is built on land stolen from the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
4:00 pm

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Lectures, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, A Politics of Radical Care: Writing Women into the History of the Egyptian Human Rights Movement (in-person and online)

Symposium | American Democracy in Crisis: Perspectives from Tocqueville, Douglass, Wells, Dewey and Arendt


PRESENTATIONS: "Alexis de Tocqueville on democracy and its culture" Jeffrey Goldfarb "Frederick Douglass, abolition, civil war, and democracy" Juliet Hooker, Brown University "Ida B. Wells, race, gender, and the struggle for voting rights" Paula Giddings, Smith College "John Dewey, the prospects for democracy in war, peace, and Depression" Deva Woodly "Hannah Arendt, insurrection and constitutionalism" James Miller, The New School ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION "What does democracy mean today in the US?" With James Miller, Paula Giddings, Juliet Hooker, Deva Woodly, Jeffrey Goldfarb
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 13
4:30 pm

Free
Symposiums, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, American Democracy in Crisis: Perspectives from Tocqueville, Douglass, Wells, Dewey and Arendt

Book Discussion | Builders, Housewives and the Construction of Modern Athens (in-person and online)


To celebrate the third edition of Ioanna Theocharopoulou’s book, this is a wide-ranging discussion about the relevance of this modern city, its architecture, and ancient history. Architectural historians have tended to disparage the lack of formal planning and the apparent homogeneity of Athen’s “box-like” concrete buildings. By casting Athens as a uniquely local mode of informal urbanism, a phenomenon that, in a broader sense, is found around the world and particularly in the “developing” world, Theocharopoulou’s book offers a critical re-evaluation of the city as a successful adaptation to circumstance, enriching our understanding of urbanism as a truly collective design activity. Builders, Housewives and the Construction of Modern Athens advocates for an architectural history that allows access to the conceptual worlds and the imaginations of builders and inhabitants. This approach departs from a focus on structures designed exclusively by architects and planners, to explore processes—financial, cultural, and material—that rely on self-organization and community. These improvisations and adaptations, which succeeded in producing a dense and vibrant city, can, in turn, help us imagine how to create more sustainable and livable urban models today.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Builders, Housewives and the Construction of Modern Athens (in-person and online)

Book Discussion | When Women Lead: What They Achieve, Why They Succeed, and How We Can Learn from Them


A groundbreaking, deeply reported work from CNBC's Julia Boorstin that reveals the key commonalities and characteristics that help top female leaders thrive as they innovate, grow businesses, and navigate crises--an essential resource for anyone in the workplace.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 13
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, When Women Lead: What They Achieve, Why They Succeed, and How We Can Learn from Them

Lecture | Architectural History is Migrant History: Construction Labor and Cantera Stone in Mexico and the US (in-person and online)


This lecture tracks the development over the last fifty years of a binational construction industry that has emerged around the excavation (in Mexico), transportation, distribution, and installation (in the U.S.) of cantera stone. Cantera literally means “quarry,” but the Spanish word is used in Mexico to describe a specific brittle rock used to build colonial churches and civic infrastructure. More recently, a network of Mexican quarrymen, stonemasons, homebuilders, architects, and businessmen have refined a cantera market that caters to a Mexican and Mexican American clientele in the American Southwest. Speaker Sarah Lopez, a built environment historian and migration scholar, is an associate professor at the Stuart Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Architectural History is Migrant History: Construction Labor and Cantera Stone in Mexico and the US (in-person and online)

Discussion | In the Wilds of Brooklyn: 2 Cartoonists in Conversation (online)


A Newsweek article published in 1943 characterized the artist Morris Hirshfield as an old man who lived, “way out in… the Wilds of Brooklyn.” In this program, Ben Katchor and Roz Chast will take this primitivizing and elitist observation as a starting point to reflect on Hirshfield’s story as a Jewish European immigrant who worked his way up the trade to become a tailor, then a successful business-owner, and later a celebrated self-taught painter in New York City. A cartoonist at The New Yorker, Chast translates the mundane in semi-confessional “clunky” comics, confronting New Yorkers’ anxieties with both humor and compassion. In his signature black-and-white pen-and-wash drawings, the graphic-novelist Katchor revives bygone architecture, activities and characters to offer a historical, yet multidimensional, portrait of the city. Both natives of Brooklyn, these two extraordinary storytellers will take us into an exquisite journey where everyday urban experience is turned into insightful art. This program will chronicle for us moments, places and themes that compose New York City’s fabric and identity, while contributing to a better understanding of Hirshfield’s life and work as a Brooklyn-based Jewish artist.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
6:00 pm

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Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, In the Wilds of Brooklyn: 2 Cartoonists in Conversation (online)

Discussion | The Making of a Novel (online)


A discussion with MFA alumni Erin Swan, Margaux Weisman, and Nidhi Pugalia as they sit down with Helen Schulman to discuss the creation of novels. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
6:00 pm

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Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, The Making of a Novel (online)

Book Discussion | Houses to Die In and Other Essays on Art


The undead of contemporary painting, avant-garde populism, photography courting stupidity, fraught networking, synthetic atmospheres, displaced abstractions, and the mediation of pain: these are among the subjects treated in this collection of essays by art historian and critic Ina Blom. Drawing on Blom's familiarity with the contemporary art scene as well as the archives of twentieth-century avant-garde art, these texts share a pull towards artistic projects that are not redemptive or exemplary but that rather convey a sense of—often unheroic—trouble. Leaning into ambivalence as a methodology of criticism, Blom takes a particular interest in the detours, doubts, and difficulties that run alongside avant-garde art’s more constructively hopeful desires for transformative innovation and change.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Houses to Die In and Other Essays on Art

Book Discussion | Path Lit by Lightning: The Life of Jim Thorpe


Jim Thorpe rose to world fame as a mythic talent who excelled at every sport. He won gold medals in the decathlon and pentathlon at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics, was an All-American football player at the Carlisle Indian School, the star of the first class of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and played major league baseball for John McGraw’s New York Giants. Even in a golden age of sports celebrities, he was one of a kind. But despite his colossal skills, Thorpe’s life was a struggle against the odds. As a member of the Sac and Fox Nation, he encountered duplicitous authorities who turned away from him when their reputations were at risk. At Carlisle, he dealt with the racist assimilationist philosophy “Kill the Indian, Save the Man.” His gold medals were unfairly rescinded because he had played minor league baseball. His later life was troubled by alcohol, broken marriages, and financial distress. He roamed from state to state and took bit parts in Hollywood, but even the film of his own life failed to improve his fortunes. But for all his travails, Thorpe did not succumb. The man survived, complications and all, and so did the myth. Author David Maraniss is an associate editor at The Washington Post and a distinguished visiting professor at Vanderbilt University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 13
6:30 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Path Lit by Lightning: The Life of Jim Thorpe

Discussion | Intoxicating the Archive: Preserving Narcotic Heritage


This event critically explores how the memories and struggles of people who use drugs and those of other marginalized and/or activist groups in history are represented in archives, museums, and collective memory at large. While often being invisible at first, drug cultures have left traces in many archives and collections. However, finding and uncovering the often hidden history of drugs and the people who used them can be challenging. Whose memories are being recorded and whose voices are lost? Focusing on archival initiatives in the Netherlands, Germany, and the US, we discuss how archive-making and politics can help preserve the material and immaterial heritage of narcotic use and the conflicts of the people involved. How can these experiences of stigma, persecution, and activism be adequately preserved, prioritized, and remembered? How can archivists, historians, and community members participate in effective and useful ways to document local histories and build archival collections? In what ways can we create new historical sources by encouraging the use of oral history and digital storytelling?
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
6:30 pm

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Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Intoxicating the Archive: Preserving Narcotic Heritage

Book Discussion | The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million (in-person and online)


Fifteen years after the release of the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Jewish Book Award winner, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million is now being reissued. The updated book contains new material developed in conjunction with Ken Burns's new 3-part documentary, The U.S. and the Holocaust, which features Daniel Mendelsohn and the story of his family. The Lost is a modern classic of post-memory literature and a riveting exploration of the Holocaust by a descendent of its victims. Mendelsohn spent five years in a dozen countries on four continents with his brother Matt (an award-winning photojournalist whose photographs appear throughout the book) searching for an answer to the question he had first asked as a boy: What really happened to his great-uncle Shmiel and his family during the Holocaust? Spoken of only in hushed murmurs or incomprehensible Yiddish phrases, Mendelsohn later discovered a bundle of letters written by Shmiel in 1939 and vowed to solve this family puzzle.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 13
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million (in-person and online)

Book Discussion | This Place | That Place: An Unnamed War (online)


Nandita Dinesh's book is a formally ambitious political and literary novel that centers on two unnamed characters from opposing sides of an unnamed war. During a wedding under curfew, a “Deprogrammer” and “Protest Designer” grapple with the ways in which the war between their homelands pervades the unexplored and undeniable attraction between them. Interwoven documents of past correspondences unpack the protagonists’ history, their admiration for the other's work, and how each sees hope — in the other, because of the other — for their respective Places.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, This Place | That Place: An Unnamed War (online)

Discussion | Song Cycles: Composers in Conversation


With composers Tamar-kali, Tanyaradzwa Tawengwa/Nzou Mambano, and Yaz Lancaster. Learn more about the new works that the composers have written, to be premiered as part of the 'Song Cycles' project at Harlem Stage. Moderated by Harlem Stage Artistic Director and CEO, Pat Cruz and Beth Morrison Projects' President and Creative Producer, Beth Morrison.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
7:00 pm

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Discussions, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Song Cycles: Composers in Conversation

Lecture | Politics of Gender in Work and Innovation in India and China (online)


Drawing on ethnographic research of design practices in post-liberalization India, Prof. Lilly Irani traces how designers target everyday acts of social reproduction as sites of intervention and valorization through design intervention. She makes the case with stories of water cooling, contrasting devalued water cooling practices characterized as jugaad or workaround with proper, branded products recognizable as innovation. These contrasting categories act as signposts to see how design practices proposed as participatory and inclusive can still reproduce class, caste, and gender hierarchies in contemporary India.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 13
10:00 pm

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Lectures, October 13, 2022, 10/13/2022, Politics of Gender in Work and Innovation in India and China (online)

Conference | A Life in Thought: Celebrating Philosopher Richard J. Bernstein


9:30am EST OPENING REMARKS Scott Shushan, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Sarah Lawrence College Alice Crary, University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy 9:45-11:15 PHILOSOPHY AS PEDAGOGY Karen Ng (moderator), Associate Professor of Philosophy, Vanderbilt University Roy Ben-Shai, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Sarah Lawrence College Megan Craig, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Stony Brook University Judith Friedlander, Professor Emerita of Anthropology, Hunter College 11:30-1:00 PHILOSOPHY AND THE PUBLIC GOOD Simona Forti (moderator), Professor of Political Philosophy, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy Axel Honneth, Jack C. Weinstein Professor for the Humanities, Columbia University Philip Kitcher, John Dewey Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, Columbia University Joel Whitebook, Professor, Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research 2:00 REFLECTION Cinzia Arruzza, Associate Professor of Philosophy 2:10-3:50 PHILOSOPHY IN A PLURALIST SPIRIT David Clinton Wills (moderator), Professor, New York University-Gallatin Maria Pia Lara, Professor and Researcher, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Chiara Bottici, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Gender and Sexuality Studies Lucius Outlaw, Jr., W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy, Vanderbilt University Charles Taylor, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, McGill University 4:05-5:35 DEMOCRACY AS A TASK BEFORE US Dmitri Nikulin (moderator), Professor of Philosophy Seyla Benhabib, Eugene Meyer Professor of Philosophy and Political Science. Emerita, Yale University and Senior Research Fellow, Columbia Law School and Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Theory Rainer Forst, Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main Nancy Fraser, Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor of Political and Social Science
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 14
9:30 am

Free
Conferences, October 14, 2022, 10/14/2022, A Life in Thought: Celebrating Philosopher Richard J. Bernstein

Symposium | Fusion: Remixing Jazz, Rethinking Genre in the 21st Century


A symposium focused on musicians who mix jazz with other musical genres and traditions. The relationship between a discourse of jazz as a paradigmatic expression of Black American culture as well as a space of musical creativity accessible to musicians across the globe regardless of their background has fueled debates regarding musical legitimacy and authenticity in and out of jazz, revealing the tensions "crossing borders" incurs for musicians, critics, and audiences. In this context, the assembled scholars interrogate fusion as genre, as performance practice, as social positioning, and in terms of aesthetic value as a way to re-think conventional notions of jazz and musical fusions writ large.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, Oct 14
10:00 am

Free
Symposiums, October 14, 2022, 10/14/2022, Fusion: Remixing Jazz, Rethinking Genre in the 21st Century

Book Discussion | Manifestations of a Sufi Woman in Central Asia: A Critical Edition of fi-i Bars Mahar al-Ajib


A discussion with author Aziza Shanazarova. The Maẓhar al-ʿajāʾib is, as of today, the only known extensive treatise devoted to a female religious master in Islamic Central Asia. It is a devotional work written to expound upon the teachings of Aghā-yi Buzurg, (“The Great Lady”), who was active in early 16th century Bukhara. Not only does the Maẓhar al-ʿajāʾib provide information for understanding the religious history of 16th century Central Asia, but it also serves as an important source for the study of female religiosity and gender history in early modern Central Asia. This lecture will discuss the recently published critical edition of the Maẓhar al-ʿajāʾib and its overall importance for the study of gender history in Muslim societies. Moderated by Valentina Izmirlieva, Director of the Harriman Institute. This event is part of a Director’s Seminar series, which allows new Harriman faculty members to introduce their research to both colleagues and students across disciplinary and departmental divides.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 14
12:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 14, 2022, 10/14/2022, Manifestations of a Sufi Woman in Central Asia: A Critical Edition of fi-i Bars Mahar al-Ajib

Lecture | The Russian Soul and the Soviet Human in Modern Chinese Culture (online)


How did Russian-Soviet literature and culture shape Chinese modernity and especially dominate twentieth-century China's cosmopolitan imaginations? Why does the so-called "Russian soul" - the Russian spirit or even the Russian ideology - continue to be influential in the contemporary Chinese consciousness in an age of China's global rise (and Putin's war in Ukraine)? Addressing such questions, Dr Wang's talk will be a general survey about the presence- or the omnipresence - of Russian-Soviet influences in China's cultural, intellectual, and spiritual transformation throughout the short revolutionary century and the following postsocialist marketization. T
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, Oct 14
2:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 14, 2022, 10/14/2022, The Russian Soul and the Soviet Human in Modern Chinese Culture (online)

Gallery Talk | She Who Wrote: Enheduanna and Women of Mesopotamia ca. 3400-2000 BC: Curator's Tour


An expert in the art of ancient Mesopotamia, Sidney Babcock is the Jeannette and Jonathan Rosen Curator and Department Head of the Department of Ancient Western Asian Seals and Tablets. This exhibition brings together for the first time a comprehensive selection of artworks that capture rich and shifting expressions of women's lives in ancient Mesopotamia. One remarkable woman was the priestess and poet Enheduanna (ca. 2300 B.C.) the earliest named author in world literature. This lecture will provide an overview of the exhibition themes and highlight several key objects.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 14
6:30 pm

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Gallery Talks, October 14, 2022, 10/14/2022, She Who Wrote: Enheduanna and Women of Mesopotamia ca. 3400-2000 BC: Curator's Tour

Gallery Talk | American Travelers: A Watercolor Journey Through Spain, Portugal, and Mexico: Exhibition Tour


Docent-led gallery tour of current exhibition that shares the large collection of watercolors by United States artists painted in Spain, Portugal, and Latin America. Works by Hassam, Kuehne, Edwards, Peixotto, Robinson, Peets, and Petrovic are presented in conjunction with a suite of recent watercolor paintings by Timothy J. Clark. Saturdays, July 23-October 15, 2022
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Oct 15
1:00 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, October 15, 2022, 10/15/2022, American Travelers: A Watercolor Journey Through Spain, Portugal, and Mexico: Exhibition Tour

Discussion | Documenting Workers in the Arabian Gulf (online)


An online panel discussion with artists who have documented workers and their conditions in the UAE and Qatar. They will discuss Jonas Bendiksen's photo reportage Far From Home, Khalid Al Baih and Aparna Jayakumar's Doha Fashion Fridays project, Molly Crabapple's illustrated expose "Slaves of Happiness", and Matt Greco and Gregory Sholette's Saadiyat Island Workers Quarters Collectable.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Oct 15
1:00 pm

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Discussions, October 15, 2022, 10/15/2022, Documenting Workers in the Arabian Gulf (online)

Book Discussion | 2 Fiction Writers Read and Discuss Their Work


Tess Gunty holds an MFA in creative writing from NYU. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Iowa Review, Joyland, Literary Hub, Granta, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Freeman’s, and other publications. The Rabbit Hutch, her first novel, was shortlisted for the Waterstones Debut Fiction Prize. She lives in Los Angeles. Isabel Kaplan is the author of the national bestselling novel NSFW, which has been longlisted for the Center For Fiction’s First Novel Prize, as well as the national bestselling young adult novel Hancock Park. She graduated from Harvard and holds an MFA in creative writing from NYU. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Oct 15
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 15, 2022, 10/15/2022, 2 Fiction Writers Read and Discuss Their Work

Discussion | Love Brought Me Through The Holocaust: A Daughter's Memories (online)


Judith Koeppel Steel was born in Berlin, Germany at the beginning of World War II. Her family escaped Germany in 1939 aboard the MS St. Louis, only to be turned away by both Cuba and the United States and sent back to Europe. Her family disembarked in Belgium, and were later imprisoned in Gurs concentration camp. Judith's father arranged for her to be hidden by a French Catholic family for the rest of the war. In 1946, Judith came to New York where she was adopted by her aunt and uncle. Ultimately, she was ordained as a Cantor.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Sun, Oct 16
2:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 16, 2022, 10/16/2022, Love Brought Me Through The Holocaust: A Daughter's Memories (online)

Book Discussion | Serbian Paramilitaries and the Breakup of Yugoslavia: State Connections and Patterns of Violence (online)


A book talk with Iva Vukušić, Assistant Professor in International History at Utrecht University and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 17
12:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 17, 2022, 10/17/2022, Serbian Paramilitaries and the Breakup of Yugoslavia: State Connections and Patterns of Violence (online)

Lecture | The Many Faces of Tojixon Shodieva: Celebrity, Empire, and the Soviet Public in Central Asia (online)


Tojixon Shodieva was the biggest celebrity in 1930s Soviet Uzbekistan. Her image as a hyper-productive Stakhanovite, a courageous activist, and the survivor of a traumatic past circulated through a wide array of mass media representations. As Shodieva became ensconced in narrative, film, and poetry, she became a Socialist Realist “positive hero” par excellence. This lecture focuses on two representations of Shodieva: one a poem by Uzbekistan’s most prominent female writer, Oydin; the other a short documentary film directed by Liudmila Snezhinskaia, a director with Alexander Medvedkin’s agitational Film Train. Entangled in a dense web of intertexual and intermedial relationships, both works not only represent Shodieva, but also call into question how that representation might be received. This lecture puts forward the “state public” as a category to explain the fraught dialectic of representation and reception in Soviet Central Asia. It argues that Socialist Realism functioned as a mode for imagining and addressing a multinational, gender-inclusive Soviet public; and, at the same time, that the unpredictable dynamics of mass participation rendered that project of mass publicity inherently unstable. With Claire Roosien.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 17
3:00 pm

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Lectures, October 17, 2022, 10/17/2022, The Many Faces of Tojixon Shodieva: Celebrity, Empire, and the Soviet Public in Central Asia (online)

Gallery Talk | Black Melancholia: Curator's Tour (online)


Curator and scholar Nana Adusei-Poku presents her recent exhibition which brings together the work of twenty-eight artists of African descent to expand and complicate the notion of melancholy in Western art history and cultures. The exhibition opens a dialogue with traditional discourses around the representation of melancholia. It pushes beyond the iconography of melancholia as an art historical subject and psychoanalytical concept to subvert highly racialized discourses in which notions of longing, despair, sadness, and loss were not only pathologized, but also reserved for white cis (fe-)male subjects.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 17
6:00 pm

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Gallery Talks, October 17, 2022, 10/17/2022, Black Melancholia: Curator's Tour (online)

Book Discussion | The Landscapes of Dieter Kienast: A Key Swiss Architect


Dieter Kienast (1945–1998) is a key Swiss figure in European landscape architecture. Amidst a striking change in the relationship between society and nature in the 1970s, he sought a synthesis between design and ecology. As a designer, planner, researcher, and professor, Kienast dedicated his life to create open spaces to enhance the wellbeing of both human beings and plants. Critiques of urban planning, processes of participation, and the significance of spontaneous urban vegetation played just as prominent a role in these discussions as did art, architecture, and literature. In the context of our current existential crisis his ideas are gaining a new momentum. With author Anette Freytag.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 17
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 17, 2022, 10/17/2022, The Landscapes of Dieter Kienast: A Key Swiss Architect

Discussion | Adventures in Italian Opera: Met Baritone Michele Pertusi


The first Adventure in Italian Opera with Fred Plotkin of this season features bass-baritone Michele Pertusi, who is currently singing the role of Creonte in Cherubini's Medea at The Metropolitan Opera.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Mon, Oct 17
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, October 17, 2022, 10/17/2022, Adventures in Italian Opera: Met Baritone Michele Pertusi

Lecture | Art, Time, Climate, Crisis


The last four decades have confronted us with the “end of history” in different ways. There was Fukuyama’s affirmative “end of history” nurturing the optimistic belief that the sense of history will realize or fulfill itself in the global proliferation of liberal-democratic societies. There was the postmodern farewell to “grand narratives” as another “end of history,” alternatively welcomed as a disengagement from false totalizations or criticized for denoting a lack of historical sensibility. Today, the present seems challenged by a radically different version of the “end of history,” an existentially menacing and at the same time plain version of the end: one of dramatic climate change and ecosystem collapse. Unlike the liberal and the postmodern end, the current apocalyptic version lies in the assumption that the ecological transformation that the planet’s inhabitants experience could be of such vast magnitude that human life as such is threatened. This end confronts us with the image of humanity’s imminent self-extinction, without any form of resurrection. Speaker Marcus Quent is a philosopher and writer. He is a research associate at the Department of Art History, Art Theory and Aesthetics at the Berlin University of the Arts.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 17
6:30 pm

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Lectures, October 17, 2022, 10/17/2022, Art, Time, Climate, Crisis

Book Discussion | Fifth Avenue: From Washington Square to Marcus Garvey Park


Author Bill Hennessey's book is an in-depth exploration of architecture along one of the world's most iconic streets: New York City's fabled Fifth Avenue. Through six fact-filled walking tours, this accessible illustrated guide takes readers along the entire length of Fifth Avenue, studying its architecture block by block, building by building, offering the chance to discover exceptional and unusual structures across Greenwich Village, Midtown, the Upper East Side, and Harlem. This talk will focus on the tour of Greenwich Village.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 18
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, Fifth Avenue: From Washington Square to Marcus Garvey Park

Book Discussion | New York Art Deco: Birds, Beasts & Blooms (online)


New York City, arguably the world's Art Deco capital, is well known for its iconic towers. In a new book, photographer Andrew Garn and writer Eric P. Nash illustrate the myriad ways that Art Deco is drawn in steel, stone, terra cotta, brass, and bronze upon the city's great buildings. Featuring both the legendary landmarks and little known treasures, this new collection of Garn's photographs richly illustrates the metropolitan menagerie.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, New York Art Deco: Birds, Beasts & Blooms (online)

Book Discussion | Lavender House: A Historical Novel of Family Secrets


Lev AC Rosen's Lavender House is Knives Out with a queer historical twist. Lavender House, 1952: the family seat of recently deceased matriarch Irene Lamontaine, head of the famous Lamontaine soap empire. Irene’s recipes for her signature scents are a well guarded secret—but it's not the only one behind these gates. This estate offers a unique freedom, where none of the residents or staff hide who they are. But to keep their secret, they've needed to keep others out. And now they're worried they're keeping a murderer in.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, Lavender House: A Historical Novel of Family Secrets

Book Discussion | Newsroom Confidential: Lessons (and Worries) from an Ink-Stained Life


Journalist Margaret Sullivan, who is a trusted champion and critic of the American news media, takes you behind the scenes of the nation's most influential news outlets. It's a conversation that explores how Americans lost trust in the news and what it will take to regain it in an evening celebrating the debut of Sullivan's new memoir.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, Newsroom Confidential: Lessons (and Worries) from an Ink-Stained Life

Talk | Preparing for Gandhi (online)


Speaker Ramachandra Guha is a historian and biographer based in Bengaluru. His books include a pioneering environmental history, The Unquiet Woods (University of California Press, 1989), an award-winning social history of cricket, A Corner of a Foreign Field (Picador, 2002), and a widely acclaimed history of his country, India after Gandhi (Macmillan/Ecco Press, 2007) He is also the author of a two-volume biography of Mahatma Gandhi (Gandhi Before India, 2013, and Gandhi: The Years that Changed the World, 2018, both published by Knopf).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
6:30 pm

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Talks, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, Preparing for Gandhi (online)

Lecture | The Poetics of Place


Join award-winning poet Helen Mitsios to discuss the importance of location when it comes to writing poetry. Participants will read two to three poems and write one of their own, and they'll have the opportunity to share their poem in a stress free, fun, and supportive workshop. Helen Mitsios is an award-winning poet, writer, and university professor. She is author of the poetry collections The Grand Tour and If Black Had A Shadow, and she is co-author of the memoir Waltzing with the Enemy: A Mother and Daughter Confront the Aftermath of the Holocaust. She is the Art+Style editor for Bob Guccione Jr.'s WONDERLUST travel magazine, where she also serves as poetry editor, and she is a member of New York Writers Workshop.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
6:30 pm

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Lectures, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, The Poetics of Place

Book Discussion | 2 New Novels: Demon Copperhead / Lark Ascending (online)


Two acclaimed creative powerhouses, Barbara Kingsolver and Silas House, have a discussion about the past, present, and future of social inequity, complex family ties, and the significance of story. Kingsolver’s heart-wrenching new novel, Demon Copperhead, is an extraordinary reimagining of David Copperfield set in the mountains of Southwest Virginia at the onset of the opioid epidemic. House looks to the near future in his riveting story of survival and hope, Lark Ascending.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, 2 New Novels: Demon Copperhead / Lark Ascending (online)

Book Discussion | The Miniaturists: An Attractioon to Tininess


Barbara Browning explores her attraction to tininess and the stories of those who share it. Interweaving autobiography with research on unexpected topics and letting her voracious curiosity guide her, Browning offers a series of charming short essays that plumb what it means to ponder the minuscule. She is as entranced by early twentieth-century entomologist William Morton Wheeler, who imagined corresponding with termites, as she is by Frances Glessner Lee, the “mother of forensic science,” who built intricate dollhouses to solve crimes.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, The Miniaturists: An Attractioon to Tininess

Discussion | Why Do We Keep Blowing It?: Covid, Monkeypox and the Next Pandemic (in-person and online)


A conversation on science communication with Katherine Wu and Jay Varma. Moderated by Robin Lloyd.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
7:00 pm

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Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, Why Do We Keep Blowing It?: Covid, Monkeypox and the Next Pandemic (in-person and online)

Book Discussion | A Minor Chorus: A Novel of Returning Home (online)


Welcomes award-winning author Billy-Ray Belcourt in celebration of his staggering debut novel. After an unnamed narrator abandons his unfinished thesis, he returns to northern Alberta in search of what eludes him. What ensues is a series of connections and disconnections that reveal the texture of life in a town literature left unexplored, where the friction between possibility and constraint provides an insistent background score. This reading and conversation tests the theory that storytelling can make us feel less lonely.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 18
7:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 18, 2022, 10/18/2022, A Minor Chorus: A Novel of Returning Home (online)

Book Discussion | Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth


Black women have higher rates of premature birth than other women in America. This cannot be simply explained by economic factors, with poorer women lacking resources or access to care. Even professional, middle-class black women are at a much higher risk of premature birth than low-income white women in the United States. In her book, Dána-Ain Davis looks into this phenomenon, placing racial differences in birth outcomes into a historical context, revealing that ideas about reproduction and race today have been influenced by the legacy of ideas which developed during the era of slavery.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 19
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 19, 2022, 10/19/2022, Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth

Book Discussion | Scripts of Blackness: Early Modern Performance Culture and the Making of Race (online)


Noémie Ndiaye presents her monograph which shows how the early modern mass media of theatre and performance culture at large helped turn blackness into a racial category. The book explores within a comparative and transnational framework the techniques of impersonation used by white performers to represent Afro-diasporic people in England, France, and Spain in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
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Wed, Oct 19
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 19, 2022, 10/19/2022, Scripts of Blackness: Early Modern Performance Culture and the Making of Race&nbsp;(online)

Discussion | Transforming Tragedy: from Pulse Nightclub to onePULSE Foundation


Hear the compelling story of Pulse Nightclub and the creation of onePULSE Foundation. Aiming to honor the victims and survivors of the largest terrorist attack on the LGBTQ+ community in the United States. Barbara Poma, owner of Pulse Nightclub and CEO of onePULSE Foundation, will expand on onePULSE’s vision for the National Pulse Memorial and Museum while Sebastian Baillet, co-chair of the Design & Construction Committee for the memorial and museum, will speak to the global design and construction effort involved in making the vision a reality.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 19
6:00 pm

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Discussions, October 19, 2022, 10/19/2022, Transforming Tragedy: from Pulse Nightclub to onePULSE Foundation

Discussion | Making Sense of the Unpredictable Economy: The New York Times's Paul Krugman in Conversation (in-person and online)


While inflation has exploded across the US — creating volatility in gas, food, and housing prices — the Federal Reserve is increasing interest rates to slow the economy. Does that just replace one form of hardship with another for American families? How can we make sense of this unpredictable economy, with its high inflation and low unemployment, and what policies can help keep us out of a recession? Paul Krugman — distinguished professor of economics, Nobel laureate, and New York Times columnist — leads a panel of experts to help us understand these topsy-turvy economic times.  Featuring: Joseph E. Gagnon, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, formerly of the US Federal Reserve Board and the US Treasury Department; Claudia Sahm, leader of the Macroeconomic Research initiative of the Jain Family Institute, formerly of the US Federal Reserve Board and President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers; and Karl Smith, an opinion columnist at Bloomberg and former vice president for federal policy at the Tax Foundation.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 19
6:30 pm

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Discussions, October 19, 2022, 10/19/2022, Making Sense of the Unpredictable Economy: The New York Times's Paul Krugman in Conversation (in-person and online)

Discussion | While We Are Still Here: Gentrification in Harlem (online)


Karen D. Taylor is the founder and executive director of While We Art Still Here, a 501 (c)(3) organization formed as a response to the threat that 409 and 555 Edgecombe history faced partially due to the passing of time, and partially due to  “gentrification,” which is rapidly altering the neighborhood of Sugar Hill and surrounding areas. Taylor will discuss her current initiative, Signs of the Times: Harlem Heritage Markers Project, which will install 25 local historic markers in the community in Spring 2023.  Taylor is driven by her passion to bring the cultural history of Harlem to the forefront of now, and to keep it relevant for generations to come. Inspired by the national discussion on “gentrification,” she is moved to steward the creation of programming that wraps the arts and humanities in a package that is a gift to the future. She consults as the director of public history for Columbia University/Teachers College’s Harlem Education History Project. She holds an MFA in Writing (Creative Nonfiction) from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and a BS in African-American Literature from the State University of New York, Empire State College. She has been a Harlem resident for more than thirty years.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 19
7:00 pm

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Discussions, October 19, 2022, 10/19/2022, While We Are Still Here: Gentrification in Harlem (online)

Conference | Chile: Towards Sustainable Economic Growth (online


This conference will bring together distinguished leaders from the public and private sector from both Chile and the region to discuss Chile’s economic outlook, the agenda for sustainable growth, as well as the growth prospects for Chile and Latin America in the midst of a challenging global scenario. Moreover, the program will include discussions on the tax reform bills introduced by President Gabriel Boric’s administration, which aim to promote investment, productivity, and innovation in the country. The audience will be comprised of members from both local and international businesses, government officials, NGOs and the press.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
8:00 am

Free
Conferences, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Chile: Towards Sustainable Economic Growth (online

Discussion | Carbon, Chemicals and Compliance (online)


Gabe Wing and Thaddeus Owen are sustainability experts who execute the ambitious 2030 goals for MillerKnoll, one of the world’s largest and most influential design manufacturers. They share stories about the challenges and successes in their mission to make design healthier and more sustainable. They will talk about their experiences with removing flame retardants from products, challenges with using recycled plastics, and the hot topic of PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals used in products.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
12:00 pm

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Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Carbon, Chemicals and Compliance (online)

Discussion | Getting Beyond the Noise: A Non-Meditator’s Guide to the Power of Silence (online)


In this deep-dive webinar, co-authors of Golden: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise, Leigh Marz and Justin Zorn, take us on an unlikely journey—from the West Wing of the White House to San Quentin’s death row; from Ivy League brain research laboratories to underground psychedelic circles; from the temperate rainforests of Olympic National Park to the main stage at a heavy metal festival—to explore the meaning of silence and the art of finding it in any situation.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
12:00 pm

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Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Getting Beyond the Noise: A Non-Meditator&rsquo;s Guide to the Power of Silence (online)

Book Discussion | Hugo Kauder: Composer, Musical Philosopher, Music Theorist (online)


Hugo Kauder was a mid-century Viennese Jewish composer, pedagogue, and émigré to America, who defied the atonal trend of his generation with his uniquely harmonic, contrapuntal style. His legacy of over 300 works, many yet to be published, is receiving renewed interest today. Alex Weiser joins Kauder's biographer, scholar and pianist Karin Wagner, for a conversation about Kauder, his work, and his legacy.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
1:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Hugo Kauder: Composer, Musical Philosopher, Music Theorist (online)

Lecture | Happiness Is Not in Affluence but in Hard Labor and a New Sense of Community: Japan's Rural Development (in-person and online)


This talks is on community-based, site-specific art projects those emerged in Japan's provinces, the regions typically excluded from a capitalist accumulation machine. The exemplary areas include Benesse Art Site Naoshima (1992-), the Seto Inland Sea, followed by the first Echigo Tsumari Art Triennial (2000-), Niigata, and the Kamikatsu Zero Waste Center, Tokushima. Speaker Midori Yamamura, Associate Professor of Art History at the CUNY Kingsborough, specializes in global contemporary art history focusing on Asia and its diaspora.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
4:00 pm

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Lectures, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Happiness Is Not in Affluence but in Hard Labor and a New Sense of Community: Japan's Rural Development (in-person and online)

Lecture | Sadie T.M. Alexander: Fascism and Race


During the 1930s the first African American economist Sadie T.M. Alexander drew parallels between racism directed against Jews in Europe and Latin America during the early 1930s and rampant racism throughout the United States by the late 1930s. Speaker Nina Banks, Associate Professor of Economics at Bucknell University, discusses Alexander's analysis of the links between fascism and racism and her recommendations for safeguarding democratic institutions and protecting the rights of racialized communities through economic reforms.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
4:30 pm

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Lectures, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Sadie T.M. Alexander: Fascism and Race

Book Discussion | Eye-D: Portraits, Featuring Grammy-Winning Rock Star Peter Gabriel


An intriguing photographic exploration of the human eye from Anna Gabriel, in conversation with Peter Gabriel. It is said that the eyes are a window to the soul. They are what we first look at when we meet a stranger, and one of the most expressive parts of the human body. The eye speaks an intricate language, one that cannot be heard, only felt. The size of the pupil can signify focus or arousal. We meet each other’s eyes to show attentive interest, yet often feel discomfort when stared at: an evolutionary trait designed to alert us to a predatory gaze. This book is a testament to the power of the human eye. It gathers together Anna Gabriel’s collection of photographs, showing the close-up eyes of numerous well-known rock and film stars, including David Byrne, Helena Christensen, Willem Dafoe, The Edge, Noel Gallagher, Annie Lennox, Susan Sarandon, Benjamin Zephaniah, Peter Gabriel and many more. Born in London, England, Anna Gabriel moved to the US in 1992 to launch her career as photographer and video director. Her fine art photography has been exhibited in galleries in Sundance, Boston, New York, and London. She has photographed musicians including Iggy Pop, Moby, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and PM Dawn and directed music videos for artists such as Joseph Arthur, Jesca Hoop, Emmanuel Jal, and Adam Masterson. Peter Gabriel first rose to fame as the lead singer of the innovative progressive rock band Genesis. After leaving Genesis in 1975, Gabriel launched a successful solo career with the hit single “Solsbury Hill.” Gabriel has championed a series of humanitarian projects and participated in numerous benefit concerts for different causes, both on and offstage. To date, Gabriel has won 6 Grammy Awards and 13 MTV Video Music Awards. He has twice been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, first as a member of Genesis, and again as a solo artist. In recognition of his many years of human rights activism, he received the Man of Peace award from the Nobel Peace Prize laureates, and Time named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world. He lives in Wiltshire, England. Tags
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 20
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Eye-D: Portraits, Featuring Grammy-Winning Rock Star Peter Gabriel

Book Discussion | The Vanishing: Tracing the Journey from Novel to Film (online)


In a blend of history, fiction, and magical realism, The Vanishing, is a new novel from David Michael Slater. The book traces how one girl, as a result of witnessing a brutal murder, turns invisible to save her best friend from the horror of Nazi Germany.  Slater will be joined in conversation by Jay Lender, writer and storyboard director of SpongeBob SquarePants and Phineas and Ferb, who is adapting the book into a live-action film. Moderated by Susan Dubin, library director and education specialist at the Sperling Kronberg Mack Holocaust Resource Center in Las Vegas. In addition to the content of the book, the conversation will address Slaters process of writing the novel and how Lender plans to make it into a film. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, The Vanishing: Tracing the Journey from Novel to Film (online)

Discussion | Invisible Victims: 9/11 and Undocumented Immigrants


It is estimated that of the 2,977 people killed on 9/11, 67 were undocumented immigrants - the majority having been workers at the Windows on the World restaurant atop the North Tower. Dr. Sekou Siby shares his own 9/11 experience as one of these workers, and is joined by Alexandra Delano, Assistant Professor of Global Studies at the New School, and Benjamin Nienass, Associate Professor of Political Science and Law at Montclair State University, to highlight the stories of undocumented immigrants who died on 9/11, while discussing the complex legal processes of proving their existence and ensuring they would not be forgotten.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 20
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Invisible Victims: 9/11 and Undocumented Immigrants

Lecture | Revokable Rights and Their Grammar of Power: Post Roe, Post Foucault


Professor Penelope Deutscher (Northwestern University) asks how and why we should understand reproductive rights as revocable, giving a broad meaning to the term “revocability,” and suggesting a conjoined vocabulary that includes conditionality, exceptionality, and disqualifying qualification.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
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Lectures, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Revokable Rights and Their Grammar of Power: Post Roe, Post Foucault

Book Discussion | Koshersoul: The Faith and Food Journal of an African American Jew (online)


Culinary historian Michael Twitty gives for a special virtual Tenement Talk. Catch up and sit down at the Epstein's 1950s dining table to discuss his latest book, an exploration of the cultural crossroads of Jewish and African diaspora cuisine and issues of memory, identity, and food.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Koshersoul: The Faith and Food Journal of an African American Jew (online)

Discussion | Make Room!: Emerging Art Spaces


Vera G. List’s philanthropic activities led to the creation of not only the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School, but also a number of other art organizations, spaces, and initiatives across universities and cultural institutions, including the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Brown University’s List Art Center, and the Vera List Art Project at Lincoln Center. Such spaces bear more than their founder’s name; they often embody the ethics, aesthetics, and vision of those who created them in explicit and tacit ways. But as philanthropy and art institutions face public scrutiny and increased calls for accountability, the role of philanthropists such as List is being questioned, reimagined, and addressed through new artist-driven and community-led organizations and initiatives. As they celebrate their founder and chart new paths for the future of the Vera List Center, look at art spaces emerging around us led by philanthropists and artists that take up the mantle of creating new spaces for experimenting with and experiencing art, but also make room for new ways of doing so. We consider not only the financial contributions of these individuals, but their values and vision for the future of art and society as reflected in the spaces they created for collective work at a moment of renewed hope and urgency for art and politics. This conversation focuses on the history of the VLC with a forward look at new artistic environments, with speakers including Lulani Arquette, President and CEO of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF), Center for Native Arts and Cultures, Portland, Jane Hait, founder, Center for Art, Research and Alliances (CARA), and Shani Peters, co-founder, The Black School. Kathy Goncharov and Carin Kuoni introduce the panel with a conversation on Vera G. List.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
6:30 pm

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Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Make Room!: Emerging Art Spaces

Book Discussion | Abolition Geography: Essays Towards Liberation


Author Ruth Wilson Gilmore is one of the foremost scholar-activists of our time. Her research and organizing has reshaped the way we think about race, place, power, prisons, and the transformations of state structures. She discusses her new book. The panel conversation will be followed by a Q&A and a book signing session.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, Abolition Geography: Essays Towards Liberation

Discussion | The Craft of Fiction: Can Creative Writing Be Taught? (online)


If writing is a craft, how do we classify the teaching of writing? Apprenticeship? Pedagogy? Art? Is it even possible to teach creative writing, or are we essentially teaching students how to better read their own and others’ work? Four authors, editors, and teachers come to our stage to tease out some answers to some of these more philosophical questions. John Oakes moderates what is certain to be a lively conversation. Come prepared with your own questions for them, too.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 20
7:00 pm

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Discussions, October 20, 2022, 10/20/2022, The Craft of Fiction: Can Creative Writing Be Taught? (online)

Book Discussion | Intermarriage and the Friendship of Peoples: Ethnic Mixing in Soviet Central Asia (online)


In marked contrast to its Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union celebrated mixed marriages among its diverse ethnic groups as a sign of the unbreakable friendship of peoples and the imminent emergence of a single “Soviet people.”  Yet the official Soviet view of ethnic nationality became increasingly primordial and even racialized beginning in the 1960s, and in this context, Adrienne Edgar argues, mixed families and individuals found it impossible to transcend ethnicity, fully embrace their complex identities, and become simply “Soviet.”  Looking back on their lives in the Soviet Union, ethnically mixed people often reported that the “official” nationality in their identity documents did not match their subjective feelings of identity; that they were unable to speak “their own” native language; and that their ambiguous physical appearance prevented them from claiming the nationality with which they most identified.  In all these ways, mixed couples and families were acutely and painfully affected by the growth of ethnic primordialism and by the tensions between the national and supranational projects in the Soviet Union. Edgar’s conclusions are based on more than eighty in-depth oral history interviews with members of mixed families in Kazakhstan and Tajikistan, along with published and unpublished Soviet documents, scholarly and popular articles from the Soviet press, memoirs and films, and interviews with Soviet-era sociologists and ethnographers.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 21
4:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 21, 2022, 10/21/2022, Intermarriage and the Friendship of Peoples: Ethnic Mixing in Soviet Central Asia (online)

Lecture | Emendations: 30 Years of Art and Politics


Founded the same year as the Vera List Center for Art and Politics but halfway across the globe, the Raqs Media Collective has sustained a practice in media, contemporary art, and curation since 1992. In these three decades, time and a sense of endurance have been their constant companions and interlocutors. How does an art practice communicate with time, and to their time, while being situated in time, however changing and inconstant as it may be? In the past thirty years, we have witnessed the world of contemporary art achieve what Okwui Enwezor termed a “will to globality”—an aspiration quite distinct from “globalization”—transcending, momentarily, eurocentric and transatlantic narcissism to embrace contemporaneity from the Global South. How might this movement be sustained, in the face of what seems to be a tendency to retreat into a new insularity of localism, especially in the wake of the ongoing pandemic and concerns about climate change? How do we make sure that our cultural and artistic practices don’t end up overcompensating for the challenges we face? How do we face the rising tide of twenty-first century authoritarianism and new anxieties propelled by right wing populism across the planet? Raqs are sensitive to the way in which the constancy of practice requires its own acts of mending, of correction, of changing course. It is this sense of how contemporary art can respond to time, and to the vicissitudes of our time, now, in the world, that Sengupta speaks to, in this illustrated 30th Anniversary Keynote Lecture.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 21
7:00 pm

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Lectures, October 21, 2022, 10/21/2022, Emendations: 30 Years of Art and Politics

Lecture | The War in the Ukraine (online)


With: Professor Robert Hamilton, Associate Professor of Eurasian Studies, U.S. Army War College
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 21
7:00 pm

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Lectures, October 21, 2022, 10/21/2022, The War in the Ukraine (online)

Discussion | Sustainability in Architecture: Contemporary Examples from Practitioners


How can we reduce the environmental footprint when renovating existing buildings? Experts from the Architecture and Engineering field present their latest projects and case studies. They talk about new challenges and new technologies in the transformation of existing building stock into a sustainable future.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Oct 22
2:30 pm

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Discussions, October 22, 2022, 10/22/2022, Sustainability in Architecture: Contemporary Examples from Practitioners

Discussion | Architectural Puzzles: The Hidden Complexity of Renovating Cultural Spaces


Architectural puzzles challenge architects in the renovation of NYC’s small and medium-size cultural institutions, particularly those housed in historic buildings. 21st-century renovations require designers to finesse big ideas within tight constraints. A panel of distinguished architects to discuss the hidden complexities — and exciting visions — behind the intricate renewal of several NYC cultural institutions.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Oct 22
4:00 pm

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Discussions, October 22, 2022, 10/22/2022, Architectural Puzzles: The Hidden Complexity of Renovating Cultural Spaces

Lecture | Making Sense of Privacy: Russia, 1780-1820 (online)


The notion of privacy is integral to our common-sense understanding of human life in modern times. We tend to assume that a private life is something people desire and practice, whether as individuals or in small groups. Scholars have nevertheless struggled to reach consensus on the nature of privacy, a private life, or the private sphere, with numerous competing definitions in circulation. Efforts to delineate the private in terms of what it is not—public—are complicated, as the latter concept has proven equally elusive. The historical terrain was especially rocky in Russia, where, we are told, these two spheres did not become meaningfully distinct until the middle of the nineteenth century. This paper tries to bring clarity and some measure of simplicity to the discussion, both by drawing on the broader scholarship around privacy, and by analyzing first-person accounts dating to the turn of the nineteenth century.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 24
3:00 pm

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Lectures, October 24, 2022, 10/24/2022, Making Sense of Privacy: Russia, 1780-1820 (online)

Book Discussion | Changing the Subject: Feminist and Queer Politics in Neoliberal India


Author Srila Roy maps the rapidly transforming terrain of gender and sexual politics in India under the conditions of global neoliberalism. The consequences of India’s liberalization were paradoxical: the influx of global funds for social development and NGOs signaled the co-optation and depoliticization of struggles for women’s rights, even as they amplified the visibility and vitalization of queer activism. Roy reveals the specificity of activist and NGO work around issues of gender and sexuality through a decade-long ethnography of two West Bengal organizations, one working on lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues and the other on rural women’s empowerment. Tracing changes in feminist governmentality that were entangled in transnational neoliberalism, Roy shows how historical and highly local feminist currents shaped contemporary queer and nonqueer neoliberal feminisms. The interplay between historic techniques of activist governance and queer feminist governmentality’s focus on changing the self offers a new way of knowing feminism—both as always already co-opted and as a transformative force in the world.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 24
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 24, 2022, 10/24/2022, Changing the Subject: Feminist and Queer Politics in Neoliberal India

Book Discussion | The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of an Empire


A spectacular generational saga of the making (and undoing) of a family dynasty: the riveting untold story of the gilded Jewish Bagdadi Sassoons, who built a vast empire through global finance and trade—cotton, opium, shipping, banking—that reached across three continents and ultimately changed the destinies of nations. With full access to rare family photographs and archives. With Joseph Sassoon.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Oct 24
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 24, 2022, 10/24/2022, The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of an Empire

Discussion | Live at The Lortel: 3-Time Tony Award-Nominated Actor Robin De Jesus (online)


Robin De Jesus is a three-time Tony Award nominated actor. Most recently, Robin joined the cast of Hulu's Welcome To The Chippendales as "Ray Colon" opposite Kumail Nanjiani. He can currently be seen in the Netflix adaptation of Tick, Tick....Boom! (2021), directed by Lin-Manuel Miranda, co-starring opposite Andrew Garfield. Prior to, he featured in the Ryan Murphy-produced Netflix film, The Boys In The Band (2020), reprising his Tony-nominated role. This will be recorded for the podcast.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Mon, Oct 24
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 24, 2022, 10/24/2022, Live at The Lortel: 3-Time Tony Award-Nominated Actor Robin De Jesus (online)

Book Discussion | Francophone Sephardic Fiction: Writing Migration, Diaspora, and Modernity (online)


Judith Roumani's  new book approaches modern Sephardic literature in a comparative way to draw out similarities and differences among selected francophone novelists from various countries, with a focus on North Africa. The definition of Sepharad here is broader than just Spain: it embraces Jews whose ancestors had lived in North Africa for centuries, even before the arrival of Islam, and who still today trace their allegiance to ways of being Jewish that go back to Babylon, as do those whose ancestors spent a few hundred years in Iberia. The author traces the strong influence of oral storytelling on modern novelists of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and explores the idea of the portable homeland, as exile and migration engulfed the long-rooted Sephardic communities.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 25
12:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Francophone Sephardic Fiction: Writing Migration, Diaspora, and Modernity&nbsp;(online)

Book Discussion | The Last Ghetto: An Imprisoned Society (online)


Terezin, as it was known in Czech, or Theresienstadt in German, was operated by the Nazis between November 1941 and May 1945 as a transit ghetto for Central and Western European Jews before their deportation for murder in the East. Today, Theresienstadt is best known for its use as Nazi propaganda to impress the International Red Cross. This important aspect must be contextualized within the society of the 140,000 people who were imprisoned there. Dr. Anna Hajkova's new book The Last Ghetto offers both a modern history of this Central European ghetto and the first in-depth analytical history of an imprisoned society during the Holocaust. Based on research from ninety-nine archives, ten countries, and nine languages, the book offers an unflinching gaze on the social experience in extremis.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 25
1:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, The Last Ghetto: An Imprisoned Society (online)

Book Discussion | Between Memory and Invention: My Journey in Architecture (online)


Robert A. M. Stern's newly published autobiography surveys his life and seismic role in the field of architecture from the 1960s to the present. The acclaimed architect talks with Glass House Chief Curator and Creative Director Hilary Lewis about this much-anticipated memoir. By turns thoughtful and irreverent, Stern's candid account highlights the often-overlooked role that an architect's life plays in shaping the buildings they produce. Replete with personal insights and humor, Between Memory and Invention details Stern's youthful efforts to redraw house plans in real estate ads, stories about the many mentors--including Philip Johnson--who have shaped his thinking, his struggle to launch an architecture practice in the 1970s amid a recession, and his more than half-century of practice as an architect, educator, and historian.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 25
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Between Memory and Invention: My Journey in Architecture (online)

Book Discussion | Combat Trauma: Imaginaries of War and Citizenship in Post-9/11 America


Americans have long been asked to support the troops and care for veterans’ psychological wounds. Who, though, does this injunction serve? As acclaimed scholar Nadia Abu El-Haj argues in her new book, in the American public’s imagination, the traumatized soldier stands in for destructive wars abroad, with decisive ramifications in the post-9/11 era. Across the political spectrum the language of soldier trauma is used to discuss American warfare, producing a narrative in which traumatized soldiers are the only acknowledged casualties of war, while those killed by American firepower are largely sidelined and forgotten.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 25
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Combat Trauma: Imaginaries of War and Citizenship in Post-9/11 America

Book Discussion | Not Just Pictures: Celebrity Portraiture


This coffee table volume is the first monograph dedicated to British photographer Chris Floyd’s (born 1968) 30-year career. Featuring over 200 photographs, it includes his sessions with Paul McCartney, David Attenborough, Debbie Harry, David Hockney, David Bowie, Marcus Rashford, Cate Blanchett, Oasis, Iggy Pop and many more. The photographs are accompanied by a collection of stories that paint a broader and sometimes funnier picture of his oeuvre.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 25
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Not Just Pictures: Celebrity Portraiture

Book Discussion | Sex Is as Sex Does: Governing Transgender Identity (online)


Author Paisley Currah on what the evolving fight for transgender rights reveals about government power, regulations, and the law
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 25
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Sex Is as Sex Does: Governing Transgender Identity (online)

Lecture | Against the Current: Design and Orthodoxy in Architecture


Award-winning architect Peter Pennoyer and his firm have a broad practice that encompasses new apartment buildings, historic renovations and even - most recently - an Art Deco-inspired clock for Manhattan's new Moynihan Train Hall. With clients ranging from Jeff Koons to East Hampton's Guild Hall to Ralston College, Pennoyer and his colleagues approach every project and design challenge on its own terms, seeking the best design even when their thinking bucks widely accepted rules. Join Pennoyer for a look at some of his firm's favorite projects as illustrations of the rewards of a design practice that often runs against the current.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 25
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Against the Current: Design and Orthodoxy in Architecture

Discussion | What Makes It Italian?: The Harp (online)


"What Makes It Italian?" is a music listening and discussion group that meets online and is open to everyone. The group is led by Gina Crusco, who guides listening at Bard LLI and Riverdale Y, and who has been music instructor at The New School and director of Underworld Productions. The modern concert harp bears little resemblance to its Persian ancestors - except in Viggiano, Basilicata. There you can still find this traveling version of the harp little changed, and being built, played, and taught to young people. Listen to music played by the instruments of Italy - and the vocalists they inspire - visiting regions from Sardinia to the Tyrol. Many of these instruments have been preserved in their early forms by isolated traditional cultures, and only recently have come to light for us to enjoy.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 25
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, What Makes It Italian?: The Harp (online)

Book Discussion | Marvel Anatomy: A Scientific Study of the Superhuman (online)


Discover the secrets behind the powers of Marvel’s greatest characters through stunning anatomical cutaway illustrations and in-depth commentary from the Black Panther and Shuri.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 25
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Marvel Anatomy: A Scientific Study of the Superhuman&nbsp;(online)

Book Discussion | Inciting Joy: How to Recognize It and Expand on It (online)


Ross Gay on the complexities and beauty of joy, asking how to recognize it--and even more crucially--how to expand it. In an intimate and electrifying collection of essays, Gay considers the joy we incite when we care for each other, especially during life's inevitable hardships. With curiosity and compassion, Gay thinks about the garden as a laboratory of mutual aid, skateboarding's reclamation of public space, the costs of masculinity, and what was healed in caring for his father as he was dying. In this event, we come together to explore the possibility of collective joy and liberation.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Oct 25
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Inciting Joy: How to Recognize It and Expand on It (online)

Discussion | Living Legacy: Dr Yusuf A Lateef’s Autophysiopsychic Music (online)


Asad Ali Jafri is a cultural producer, community organizer and interdisciplinary artist. Using a grassroots approach and global perspective, Asad connects artists and communities across imagined boundaries to create meaningful engagements and experiences. Asad has over two decades of experience honing an intentional and holistic practice that allows him to take on the role of artist and administrator, curator and producer, educator and organizer, mentor and strategist.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Oct 25
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 25, 2022, 10/25/2022, Living Legacy: Dr Yusuf A Lateef&rsquo;s Autophysiopsychic Music (online)

Lecture | Colonial New York’s Emergence as a Center of North American Jewish Commercial and Communal Activity (in-person and online)


Noah Gelfand's talk employs an Atlantic perspective to examine the economic and religious endeavors of New York's growing Jewish population in the eighteenth century, an era when Jewish settlers developed the colony into one of the most important locations for Jewish people in the Atlantic world.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
1:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Colonial New York&rsquo;s Emergence as a Center of North American Jewish Commercial and Communal Activity (in-person and online)

Discussion | Renowned Choreographer Pina Bausch and Tanztheater: History and Screening (in-person and online)


Dance historian and educator Wendy Perron discusses Pina Bausch's years in New York from 1959-1961. Bausch (1940 - 2009) was a German dancer and choreographer who was a significant contributor to a neo-expressionist dance tradition now known as Tanztheater. Topics include Bausch's time as a student at Juilliard, the ensuing year when she chose to stay in New York, danced in the Metropolitan Opera Ballet and a piece by Paul Taylor, and collaborated with Paul Sanasardo and Donya Feuer. Perron will screen excerpts of the final spring concert at Juilliard in 1960, A Choreographer Comments by Antony Tudor, Seasons by La Meri and discuss how these experiences influenced her life's work.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
1:00 pm

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Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Renowned Choreographer Pina Bausch and Tanztheater: History and Screening (in-person and online)

Discussion | How AI Is Changing Artistic Creation (online)


Should art generated by AI be considered art? Can machines be as creative as humans? Generative art made with algorithms has existed since the early days of computing in the 1960s. In recent years, a new strand of generative art has emerged: AI-generated art, which leverages the recent progress of artificial intelligence to create artworks. Unlike old-fashioned generative art, AI-generated art is not produced with an explicit set of programming instructions provided by human artists; instead, it involves training an algorithm on a dataset so that it can later produce artworks (images, music, or video clips) using its own internal parameters that have not been explicitly defined by a human. This process raises fascinating questions at the intersection of computer science, art history, and the philosophy of art. At a superficial level of analysis, AI-generated art seems to offload much of the creative impetus of art production to the machine, requiring minimal intervention from the artist. On closer inspection, however, it involves a novel process of curation at two key stages: upstream in the selection of the dataset on which the algorithm is trained, and downstream in the selection of the outputs that should qualify as artworks. Instead of replacing human artists with computers, AI-generated art can be understood as a new kind of collaboration between mind and machine, both of which contribute to the aesthetic value of the final artwork. This discussion will bring together AI artists and philosophers to explore the significance of this new mode of art production. We will discuss the implications of AI-generated art for the definition of art, the nature of the relationship between artists and tools, the process of digital curation, and whether AI systems can be as creative as humans.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
2:00 pm

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Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, How AI Is Changing Artistic Creation (online)

Talk | Taiwan, Berlin, and the Ghost Town (in-person and online)


Speaker Kevin Chen began his artistic career as a cinema actor, starring in the Taiwanese and German films Ghosted, Kung Bao Huhn, and Global Player. Now based in Germany, he is a staff writer for Performing Arts Reviews magazine. He’s published several novels and short story collections, including Attitude, Flowers from Fingernails, Ghosts by Torchlight, the essay collection Rebellious Berlin, Three Ways to Get Rid of Allergies and other titles.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
2:30 pm

Free
Talks, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Taiwan, Berlin, and the Ghost Town (in-person and online)

Book Discussion | No Plan B: A New Jack Reacher Adventure (online)


Lee and Andrew Child celebrate their new book.  In Gerrardsville, Colorado, a woman dies under the wheels of a moving bus. The death is ruled a suicide. But Jack Reacher saw what really happened: A man in a gray hoodie and jeans, moving stealthily, pushed the victim to her demise—before swiftly grabbing the dead woman’s purse and strolling away. When another homicide is ruled an accident, Reacher knows this is no coincidence. With a killer on the loose, Reacher has no time to waste to track down those responsible. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
3:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, No Plan B: A New Jack Reacher Adventure (online)

Discussion | Abolitionist Feminism (online)


Over the past year, archivists have been processing the collections of the New York Coalition for Women Prisoners, a formation led by formerly incarcerated people organizing against the gendered violence of the carceral state. Working with the materials of the CWP and its members has sparked significant reflection about the relationship between archives and the carceral state and, in turn, the implications of incorporating stories, narratives, and histories of anti-carceral organizing into the institutional archive as it currently exists.  As scholars like Saidiya Hartman, Marisa Fuentes, and Jarrett Drake teach us, the archive—much like the prison—is a site of containment, one which confines, controls, and  exerts ownership over knowledge to discipline our collective understanding of history and the present towards the needs and desires of the racial capitalist state. With this in mind, what does it mean to archive the histories and narratives of incarcerated people when the archive itself is, in many ways, a carceral enclosure? What are the implications of holding collections of materials documenting anti-carceral struggles within universities like Columbia, which are deeply invested in maintaining systems of carcerality and fueling carceral expansion in their surrounding neighborhoods? This panel brings together scholar-activists who have gone against the grain of the carceral archive to construct historical accounts that deepen genealogies of anti-carceral organizing and propel today’s abolitionist feminist movements forward. Through grappling with these questions, we’ll begin to imagine the possibilities (or impossibilities) of an abolitionist feminist archive.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
6:00 pm

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Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Abolitionist Feminism (online)

Book Discussion | Constructing a Nervous System: A Memoir by Pulitzer Prize Winner Margo Jefferson (in-person and online)


Margo Jefferson, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and former longtime arts critic for The New York Times, discusses the anticipated follow-up to her memoir Negroland, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. In Constructing a Nervous System, Jefferson brings to life the figures who have contributed to her sense of self — family members, jazz musicians, artists, and athletes. The stunning result — combining memoir with reflections on the likes of Josephine Baker, James Baldwin, Kara Walker, Ike Turner, and even Bing Crosby — reveals the mind of one of our great critics, examining both herself and American culture and society. She speaks about the book with fellow memoirist and nonfiction writer Elizabeth Kendall.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
6:30 pm

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Book Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Constructing a Nervous System: A Memoir by Pulitzer Prize Winner Margo Jefferson (in-person and online)

Talk | Censorship, Socialism, and Synagogues: The Rich Legacy of Jewish History South of Union Square


Explore the incredibly rich and varied Jewish history of Greenwich Village and the East Village South of Union Square -- from censorship battles to socialist agitators, and synagogues galore, including the former home of one of the country's first reform congregations, which would build what was the world's largest synagogue. We'll also discuss efforts to seek landmark designation for this historic, endangered area, which has played such a crucial role in not only Jewish but African American, LGBTQ+, women's, labor, literary and artistic history Speaker Andrew Berman has been the Executive Director of Village Preservation for over twenty years, since January 2002. During that time, the organization has focused on expanding landmark and zoning protections throughout their neighborhoods, securing landmark protections for over 1,250 buildings, and zoning protections for nearly 100 blocks. Andrew has often focused that advocacy on protecting sites connected to great artists and artistic movements, as well as previously overlooked and underrepresented histories such as those of immigrants, women, LGBTQ+ people, and African Americans. His academic background focused on art history and urban architecture of the 19th and 20th centuries.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Oct 26
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Censorship, Socialism, and Synagogues: The Rich Legacy of Jewish History South of Union Square

Lecture | Deaths of Artists


Deep within the bowels of The Metropolitan Museum of Art are two macabre scrapbooks packed with century-old obituaries of artists who died tragically by suicide, foul play, disease, or in bizarre accidents. Join Jim Moske, Managing Archivist of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as he profiles the eccentric curator who compiled this strange archive, and shares images of the most startling headlines and stories. These grim fragments retrieved from the past echo disturbing themes and motifs common in popular depictions of creative people for centuries.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
6:30 pm

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Lectures, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Deaths of Artists

Discussion | Recognizing and Protecting Jewish History


A night of landmark discussion on the history of Union Square, and historic preservation! Special guest Village Preservation will discuss Union Square’s path to landmark status designation. Beginning with a historical overview of the Square, they’ll continue through to the landmarking campaign, and finish with an audience Q&A. Come learn how Union Square became a landmark.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Oct 26
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Recognizing and Protecting Jewish History

Discussion | Emerge: Asian Diasporic Writers in Conversation


Five Asian writers read from their debut novels and discuss what it means to be an emerging writer today. Poet and authors Wo Chan, Sanjena Sathian, Sarah Thankam Mathews, Qian Julie Wang, and Ryan Lee Wong work across a variety of disciplines and represent the vibrancy of work emerging from the vast Asian diasporic community.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Oct 26
7:30 pm

Free
Discussions, October 26, 2022, 10/26/2022, Emerge: Asian Diasporic Writers in Conversation

Discussion | Producer of The U.S. and the Holocaust in Conversation (online)


Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal, New York Times) sits down with award-winning documentary filmmaker Lynn Novick, co-director and producer of The U.S. and the Holocaust. She has been making landmark documentary films about American life and culture for more than 30 years. She has created nearly 100 hours of acclaimed programming for PBS in collaboration with Ken Burns, including Ernest Hemingway, The Vietnam War, Baseball, Jazz, Frank Lloyd Wright, The War, and Prohibition — these landmark series have garnered 19 Emmy nominations. One of the most respected documentary filmmakers and story tellers in America, Novick herself has received Emmy, Peabody and Alfred I. duPont Columbia Awards.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 27
12:30 pm

Free
Discussions, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Producer of The U.S. and the Holocaust in Conversation (online)

Lecture | Digital State Capitalism in the Context of Belt Road Initiatives (in-person and online)


The increasing digitalisation of international trade deepens globalisation, and data flows play a key role in this transformation. With its rise as an information superpower, China is reshaping global data governance by exporting digital products and building digital infrastructures. Behind this expansion is the increasing growth of China’s global e-commerce services in African smart cities. China exports not only its technology but also its authoritarian values and governance mechanisms to host states. It is building up China’s soft power in data governance in furtherance of digital state capitalism (DSC) consistent with a Beijing Model. A digital silk road (DSR) has come into shape to consolidate China’s advocated cyber sovereignty. Speaker Qingxiu Bu has published widely in a variety of areas of law, many of which are themed around law and global challenges, with a particular focus on the development of legal infrastructures in transnational law and global governance. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
4:00 pm

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Lectures, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Digital State Capitalism in the Context of Belt Road Initiatives (in-person and online)

Lecture | Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: The Epidemic You Don't Hear About (online)


Heather Bruegl will discuss an epidemic that no one is talking about outside of Indian Country: an epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women. With numbers so high that they are unreported, how do we deal with it all?  Why aren't there concrete statistics?  Why do the crimes go unreported?  What has the FBI done to help with this epidemic?  What does “Missing White Woman Syndrome” have to do with this?  In the Munsee language, Heather Bruegl’s name is Kiishookunkwe, meaning sunflower in full bloom. Heather is a citizen of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and a first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee. She is a graduate of Madonna University in Michigan and holds a Master of Arts in U.S. History. Heather is the former director of education at Forge Project and travels frequently to present on Native American history, including policy and activism. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
5:00 pm

Free
Lectures, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: The Epidemic You Don't Hear About (online)

Lecture | Hobbes on Sex


Even on a close reading of Hobbes’s corpus, it is difficult to extract a clear picture of his views on gender. In the history of philosophy, most of the ‘great’ philosophers engaged with questions about women’s ‘nature’ and the appropriate role for women in the family, society, and state. Hobbes, however, seems to have far less to say on the subject than most, and what he does say is often ambiguous or paradoxical. It is a fundamental tenet of Hobbes’s political theory that all people are equal in the state of nature, women included; yet he makes reference to the general superiority of men as regards physical strength, courage, wit, and suitability for rule. Hobbes denies the naturalness, inevitability, and godliness of patriarchy, and he even argues for natural maternal right; however, he describes families in civil societies in terms of fathers ruling over their servants and children—leaving women out of the picture altogether. His texts are peppered with various offhand comments, allusions, and intimations about women and sexuality more generally, many of which are provocative and undeveloped. One of the most intriguing parts of his analysis is his repeated appeal to the example of the ancient Amazonian warrior women who engaged in procreative contracts with men from neighboring tribes. Speaker Susanne Sreedhar (Boston University) uses Hobbes’s discussion of the Amazons to examine his views about gender and, thereby, his place in the history of philosophy as seen from a feminist perspective.                                     
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
6:00 pm

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Lectures, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Hobbes on Sex

Lecture | Moving Beauty: Rethinking Architecture's Forgotten Mandate (in-person and online)


Throughout late-modernity, Architecture has progressively relied on scientific and technological knowledge as a means to justify itself and its projects. With some notable exceptions, aesthetic considerations have been relegated to a secondary or complementary role. Beauty in Architecture has become something that can be considered only if Reason has first solved its socio-economical requirements; and even then, we tend to frame the quest for Beauty as superficial, capricious, and banal. Throughout Western Culture, Beauty has had an unrelinquishable part in the construction of any World deemed worthy of chasing. Architecture holds a special responsibility in these Ethics: the Vitruvian Triad does not give us a choice on whether we should incorporate Beauty into our design of the habitable world; it mandates Stability, Utility,and Beauty. In the relation between Architecture and Migration, this forgotten mandate becomes apparent. Solving problems such as -- among others -- housing for the displaced or shelter for those in movement in a functional and economical manner is, of course, indispensable. However, Architecture must remember that Beauty it is one of the main forces that jumpstarts human movement. Aristotle speculated that only a beautiful image can move us in the direction of what is fair and just. Has that really changed? If not, Architecture must not only reconsider the importance of Beauty, it must also question who determines what is Beautiful: are we to continue pretending a few can dictate what Beauty is, or are we to open our eyes to what really moves people; to Democratic Beauty? Speaker William Brinkman-Clark is a professor at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
6:00 pm

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Lectures, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Moving Beauty: Rethinking Architecture's Forgotten Mandate (in-person and online)

Lecture | George Washington's Hair and Forgotten Histories of Memory and Patriotism in Early America (in-person and online)


In this lecture, Keith Beutler will discuss how surviving reported locks of George Washington's hair in the holdings of more than 100 public archives and historical museums offer clues about influential, but often forgotten performances of patriotic memory in the early United States.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 27
6:30 pm

$5 in-person...
Lectures, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, George Washington's Hair and Forgotten Histories of Memory and Patriotism in Early America (in-person and online)

Discussion | New York Times Bestselling Author Joyce Carol Oates in Conversation


Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Book Award and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction. She has published numerous essays and memoirs, novellas, plays, children's and young adult fiction, and dozens of works of short fiction, poetry, and fiction, including We Were the Mulvaneys and Blonde (a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize), as well as New York Times bestsellers The Falls (winner of the 2005 Prix Femina Etranger) and The Gravedigger's Daughter, A Book of American Martyrs, and the most recent, Hazards of Time Travel, My Life as a Rat, and Night. Sleep. Death.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 27
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, New York Times Bestselling Author Joyce Carol Oates in Conversation

Book Discussion | Poison Ivy: How Elite Colleges Divide Us


Evan Mandery's book is an eye-opening look at how America’s elite colleges and suburbs help keep the rich rich—making it harder than ever to fight the inequality dividing us today The front-page news and the trials that followed Operation Varsity Blues were just the tip of the iceberg. Poison Ivy tells the bigger, seedier story of how elite colleges create paths to admission available only to the wealthy, despite rhetoric to the contrary. Evan Mandery reveals how tacit agreements between exclusive “Ivy-plus” schools and white affluent suburbs create widespread de facto segregation. And as a college degree continues to be the surest route to upward mobility, the inequality bred in our broken higher education system is now a principal driver of skyrocketing income inequality everywhere.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
7:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Poison Ivy: How Elite Colleges Divide Us

Discussion | Alex Katz and Paul Taylor: Four Decades of Collaborations


Join Paul Taylor Dance Company Artistic Director Michael Novak and celebrated Taylor alumna and educators Carolyn Adams and Susan McGuire as they discuss the lasting resonance of Alex Katz's collaborations with dancemaker Paul Taylor. Select archival video highlights from their 15 collaborations will be screened, as well as insights into the process, design, and impact of interdisciplinary collaborations. Across eight decades of intense creative production, Alex Katz (b. 1927, Brooklyn, New York) has sought to capture visual experience in the present tense. Emerging as an artist in the mid-20th century, Katz forged a mode of figurative painting that fused the energy of abstract expressionist canvases with the American vernaculars of the magazine, billboard, and movie screen. Throughout his practice, he has turned to his surroundings in downtown New York City and coastal Maine as his primary subject matter, documenting an evolving community of poets, artists, critics, dancers, and filmmakers who have animated the cultural avant-garde from the postwar period to the present. Dancemaker Paul Taylor (1930-2018) first presented his choreography with five other dancers in Manhattan on May 30, 1954. That modest performance marked the beginning of a profound, uninterrupted creative output that shaped the future of American modern dance and continues to this day. Since its earliest days, the Paul Taylor Dance Company has toured to venues throughout the United States and around the globe, from college campuses and rural towns to the world's leading opera houses and performing arts centers. The Company has performed in more than 600 cities in sixty-six countries.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
7:00 pm

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Discussions, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Alex Katz and Paul Taylor: Four Decades of Collaborations

Lecture | Language Has No Throat


Silence consoles us during an interruption in the flow of words, while pausing for the right words to approach, and in moments when words are hiding away from us. During blocks in which no words would emerge, silence allows us to shift from speech to writing.  Language, in the end, has no throat. As part of the Fall 2022 IDS Lecture Series, Adania Shibli will reflect on being forced into dysfluency in the context of Palestine/Israel, and learning to write in silence as a counterpoint to speaking and to the dubious treatment of words based on their functionality, therefore freeing language from performing the role of pure expression.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
7:00 pm

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Lectures, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Language Has No Throat

Discussion | Manifesting: The Spirit in the Music (online)


The deep connections between Jazz and the creative influence of Islam, at their root, have a spiritual manifestation that builds on the legacy of Black American music forms. This manifestation of the spirit allows for an exploration that brings together stories, geographies, faiths and musical forms, responding to real life conditions of past and present while imagining the future. It manifests in both the individual and the collective. This session explores the individual stories of musicians that manifest the spirit in the music. With: Dr. Rasul Miller Destiny Muhammad Amatus Sami Moderator: Abdul-Rehman Malik
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Oct 27
7:00 pm

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Discussions, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Manifesting: The Spirit in the Music (online)

Discussion | Paul Taylor Dance Company Artistic Director and Famous Painter Alex Katz


In conjunction with the Guggenheim Museum's painter and sculptor Alex Katz retrospective - Alex Katz: Gathering - join Paul Taylor Dance Company Artistic Director Michael Novak and celebrated Taylor alumna and educators Carolyn Adams and Susan McGuire as they discuss the lasting resonance of Alex Katz's collaborations with dancemaker Paul Taylor. Select archival video highlights from their 15 collaborations will be screened, as well as insights into the process, design, and impact of interdisciplinary collaborations.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Oct 27
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, October 27, 2022, 10/27/2022, Paul Taylor Dance Company Artistic Director and Famous Painter Alex Katz

Lecture | Death, Deprivation, and Rational Regret (online)


Is death a bad thing? According to the "deprivation account," death is bad because the dead don't get the various goods that they would have if only they were still alive. But it's not normally a misfortune when a merely possible good doesn't come your way. Bill Gates didn't write you a check for a million dollars today, but it would be silly to be upset at that. So how can death actually be bad? This talk will explore a promising answer. With Shelly Kagan of Yale University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 28
3:30 pm

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Lectures, October 28, 2022, 10/28/2022, Death, Deprivation, and Rational Regret (online)

Book Discussion | Quitting Your Day Job: Chauncey Hare’s Photographic Work


To celebrate the launch of the first critical biography of the American photographer Chauncey Hare, author Robert Slifkin is joined in conversation by the artist Martha Rosler, an ex-teacher of Hare's, as they discuss Hare's extraordinary life and art.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 28
6:00 pm

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Book Discussions, October 28, 2022, 10/28/2022, Quitting Your Day Job: Chauncey Hare&rsquo;s Photographic Work

Lecture | The War That Made the Roman Empire: Antony, Cleopatra, and Octavian at Actium (online)


With: Professor Barry Strauss, Bryce and Edith M. Bowmar Professor in Humanistic Studies, Cornell University
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Oct 28
7:00 pm

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Lectures, October 28, 2022, 10/28/2022, The War That Made the Roman Empire: Antony, Cleopatra, and Octavian at Actium (online)

Discussion | The Museum of Jewish Heritage: Past, Present, and Future


Jerry Boryca and Eamon Roche of Roche Modern, the design firm behind the Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust's iconic six-sided building in Battery Park City, will discuss the history of the project, the decisions the firm made throughout the building process, the current challenges the structure faces as Battery Park City undergoes a resiliency project starting this fall, and the future of the Museum, which includes the expansion of programming and exhibition spaces within the original building plan.   
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sun, Oct 30
4:00 pm

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Discussions, October 30, 2022, 10/30/2022, The Museum of Jewish Heritage: Past, Present, and Future

Book Discussion | Buried Beneath the City: An Archaeological History of New York (online)


Bits and pieces of the lives led long before the age of skyscrapers are scattered throughout New York City, found in backyards, construction sites, street beds, and parks. Indigenous tools used thousands of years ago; wine jugs from a seventeenth-century tavern; a teapot from Seneca Village, the nineteenth-century Black settlement displaced by Central Park; raspberry seeds sown in backyard Brooklyn gardens--these everyday objects are windows into the city's forgotten history. Buried Beneath the City uses urban archaeology to retell the history of New York, from the deeper layers of the past to the topsoil of recent events. The book demonstrates how the archaeological record often goes beyond written history by preserving mundane things--details of everyday life that are beneath the notice of the documentary record. These artifacts reveal the density, diversity, and creativity of a city perpetually tearing up its foundations to rebuild itself. Buried Beneath the City is at once an archaeological history of New York City and an introduction to urban archaeology.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Nov 1
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, November 01, 2022, 11/01/2022, Buried Beneath the City: An Archaeological History of New York (online)

Book Discussion | The Tiger and the Cage: A Memoir of a Body in Crisis (online)


Author Emma Bolden for a virtual evening celebrates her new book. This exquisitely wrought debut memoir recounts Bolden's lifelong struggle with chronic pain and endometriosis, while speaking more broadly to anyone who has been told “it’s all in your head.” Bolden uses her own experience as the starting point for a journey through the institutional misogyny of Western medicine—from a history of labeling women “hysterical” and parading them as curiosities to a lack of information on causes or cures for endometriosis despite more than a century of documented cases. Recounting botched surgeries and dire side effects from pharmaceuticals affecting her and countless others, Bolden speaks to the ways people are often failed by the official narratives of institutions meant to protect them.    
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Nov 1
7:30 pm

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Book Discussions, November 01, 2022, 11/01/2022, The Tiger and the Cage: A Memoir of a Body in Crisis (online)

Discussion | In Dreams Awake: Morris Hirshfield's Visual Imagination (online)


The exhibition Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered presents stylized paintings of landscapes, animals and female figures. Often nude, the portraits are disarming, turning women’s bodies into fantastically flattened eroticized figures. This program will explore Hirshfield’s visual imagination while posing questions concerning his male gaze.  Hosted and moderated by art critic Isabella Segalovich, the discussion will feature three women artists who all defy realism in their combination of bright colors, decorative motifs, mythology and popular culture. Painter Susan Bee produces mythological paintings where archetypes are used to render social and personal struggles. Sculptor Kathy Ruttenberg composes fairytale ceramic tableaux where female figures merge with animal and floral figures. Painter Jamea Richmond Edwards offers parables of the present and the future with mystical versions of herself and others. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Nov 2
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, November 02, 2022, 11/02/2022, In Dreams Awake: Morris Hirshfield's Visual Imagination (online)

Book Discussion | Halfway from Home: Escaping to Nostalgia (online)


When she left a chaotic home at eighteen, author Sarah Fawn Montgomery chased restlessness, claiming places on the West Coast, Midwest, and East Coast, while determined never to settle. But it is difficult to move forward when she longs for the past. Now her family is ravaged by addiction, illness, and poverty; the country is increasingly divided; and the natural worlds in which she seeks solace are under siege by wildfire, tornadoes, and unrelenting storms. In her new book, Montgomery turns to nostalgia as a way to grieve a rapidly-changing world, excavating the stories and scars we bury and unearthing literal and metaphorical childhood time capsules and treasures.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Nov 3
7:30 pm

Free
Book Discussions, November 03, 2022, 11/03/2022, Halfway from Home: Escaping to Nostalgia (online)

Discussion | Intergenerational Memories of New York City Club Dancers


Choreographer Ephrat Asherie is working with the Jerome Robbins Dance Division to collect and archive oral histories from elders who helped create and usher in NYC’s underground dance scene in the 1970s and 1980s. In this program, legendary elders from the underground dance community will share their stories in conversation with Asherie.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Nov 7
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, November 07, 2022, 11/07/2022, Intergenerational Memories of New York City Club Dancers

Discussion | Live at The Lortel: Pioneering Native American Playwright Larissa FastHorse (online)


Larissa FastHorse is an award-winning writer and 2020-2025 MacArthur Fellow. Her satirical comedy, The Thanksgiving Play (Playwrights Horizons/Geffen Playhouse),was one of the top ten most-produced plays in America. She is the first Native American playwright in the history of American theater on that list. In Spring 2023, The Thanksgiving Play will make its debut on Broadway produced by Second Stage. She is the first female Native American playwright ever produced on Broadway.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Nov 14
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, November 14, 2022, 11/14/2022, Live at The Lortel: Pioneering Native American Playwright Larissa FastHorse (online)

Book Discussion | Natural History: Small Events, Big Reverberations (online)


National Book Award-winning author Andrea Barrett presents her new collection--named one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2022 by Literary Hub and the Millions. Barrett completes the beautiful arc of intertwined lives of a family of scientists, teachers, and innovators that she has been weaving through multiple books. Gorgeously depicting connections between the natural world and the human heart, Barrett's stories culminate to reveal how the smallest events of the past can have large reverberations across the generations.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Nov 17
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, November 17, 2022, 11/17/2022, Natural History: Small Events, Big Reverberations (online)
Complimentary Tickets

to shows, concerts ... (CFT Deals!)

Classical Music | Symphonic and Operatic Music at a Major NYC Hall

Regular Price: $50
CFT Member Price: $0.00

Performance | Internationally-Acclaimed Show, "Hilarious"

Regular Price: $55
CFT Member Price: $0.00
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