free things to do in New York City
Free events for Wednesday, 02/20/19
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Free Events, Free Things to Do in New York City!  Read More

New York attracts world's best minds to its shores: they come here to interact with each other at conferences and seminars, and while they are here they are often invited to give a talk, a lecture, to be a part of a public discussion. We at Club Free Time give you an opportunity to be a part of it: to watch how those best minds in the world work! Don't miss the opportunities that only New York City (NYC) provides!

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152 free talks, lectures, discussions in New York City (NYC) Wed, 02/20/2019 - and on...

In New York City, you can talk with and listen to the best minds in the world without spending a dime! Just take a look at free talks, lectures, discussion, seminars, conferences listed on this page below!

Book Discussion |
The Nine Cloud Dream: A New Translation of a Korean Literary Masterpiece


Korea’s most prized literary masterpiece: a Buddhist journey questioning the illusions of human life—presented in a vivid new translation by PEN/Hemingway finalist Heinz Insu Fenk. Often considered the highest achievement in Korean fiction, The Nine Cloud Dream poses the question: Will the life we dream of truly make us happy? Written in 17th-century Korea, this classic novel’s wondrous story begins when a young monk living on a sacred Lotus Peak in China succumbs to the temptation of eight fairy maidens. For doubting his master’s Buddhist teachings, the monk is forced to endure a strange punishment: reincarnation as the most ideal of men.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
6:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, The Nine Cloud Dream: A New Translation of a Korean Literary Masterpiece

Talk | Dapper Dan, Legendary Harlem Fashion Designer


Dapper Dan discusses the Harlem Renaissance and its impact on fashion and culture.  Dapper Dan's influential boutique, operated from 1982–92 and is most associated with introducing high fashion to the hip hop world, with his clients over the years including Eric B. & Rakim, Salt-N-Pepa, LL Cool J, and Jay-Z. In 2017, he launched a fashion line with Gucci, with which he opened a second store and atelier, Dapper Dan's of Harlem, in 2018.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Feb 20
6:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Dapper Dan, Legendary Harlem Fashion Designer

Discussion | The Black Experience in America: Social Justice and the Criminal Justice System


The discourse of mass incarceration was brought to the fore with the explosive work by Michelle Alexander in her book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Alexander’s work unpeeled how a racialized justice system severely hinders people of color in general, and Black people the worst. Afterwards, the release of Ava Duvernay’s documentary, “13th,” provided a visual on how Black communities were impacted as a result of the rise of incarceration mostly due to rigid and racialized drug conviction laws during the so-called, “War on Drugs.” Before this, a number of scholars, activists, grassroots organizations and community members worked tirelessly on criminal justice reform for decades. As the case for dismantling a broken criminal justice grew, the solutions on re-entry in the age of mass incarceration became an even bigger question. As criminal justice reform initiatives percolate across the United States, the complex and difficult discourse on racism, social justice and the justice system continue. This panel will tackle the issues and possible remedies. With: -- Law Professor Fareed Hayat -- Professor Carla Shedd -- Professor Rolanda West Spencer -- Law Professor Anthony Thompson Free and open to the public! Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Co-sponsored by Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute; Black Student Union NYU; Center for the Study of Africa and the African Diaspora; Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law; Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures; The Latinx Project; Liberal Studies Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee; and Liberal Studies Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Student Advisory Board Click for full details and to RSVP
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, The Black Experience in America: Social Justice and the Criminal Justice System

Discussion | North Macedonia: On the Precipice


This panel will discuss what is at stake in the Republic of North Macedonia in this moment following the Greek parliament’s approval of the Prespa agreement to change its name, enabling it to move forward toward NATO enlargement and EU candidacy. Following nearly thirty years of obstruction preventing Macedonia from joining EU institutions, as well as internaitonal ones because of its name dispute with Greece, the new Republic of North Macedonia now has a major opening to seek NATO membership and a future in the European Union. Panel: -- Reuf Bajrovic, former Minister of Energy in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina -- Dimitar Bechev, nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center -- Zhikica Pagovski, partnerships officer at the External Relations Department of the German Marshall Fund, Washington D.C. -- Elena Stavrevska, Visiting Research Fellow at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, Notre Dame University -- Moderated by Tanya Domi, SIPA, Harriman Institute
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
6:15 pm

Free
Discussions, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, North Macedonia: On the Precipice

Talk | Adventures in Italian Opera: A Conversation with Soprano Nadine Sierra


The fourth Adventure in Italian Opera with Fred Plotkin of this season features American soprano Nadine Sierra, performing this season at The Metropolitan Opera in Verdi's Rigoletto.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Feb 20
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Adventures in Italian Opera: A Conversation with Soprano Nadine Sierra

Talk | Minimalism And Conceptual Art 


An artist, a curator, and an installation director will discuss the most comprehensive publication of the revered twentieth century artist Sol Lewitt's work to date. Featuring Lindsay Aveilhé Susan Cross John Hogan Pat Steir Christopher Vacchio Iconic American artist Sol LeWitt is credited with helping to establish both minimalism and conceptual art. After more than a decade spent working in close collaboration with the artist’s estate, Artifex Press presents Sol LeWitt Wall Drawings Catalogue Raisonné, the definitive publication  of the roughly 1,350 wall drawings that LeWitt  produced. Comprising archival photographs, diagrams, installation instructions, sound recordings, and video, the collection  highlights the evolution of LeWitt’s work over the roughly 3,500 installations of his wall drawings.  The catalog’s editorial team is joined by an artist and close friend of LeWitt, the Senior Curator of Visual Arts at MASS MoCA, and  the Installation Director for Sol LeWitt's wall drawings to discuss the publication and reflect on the lasting importance of the artist’s body of work. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Minimalism And Conceptual Art&nbsp;

Discussion | Representation in Art: What Does It Mean?


Each season since 2012, artists and writers across disciplines have gathered for a year-long series devoted to unpacking artistic and cultural terms as their meaning shifts--and may become more resonant or ambiguous--over time. This year, the series will revolve around "representation," particularly as the term at once conjures critical strategies in art from previous decades; the necessity of diverse publics; and, against the backdrop of precarious governing institutions, recent impulses toward non-representative social structures on both ends of the political spectrum. The conversation of the winter season will feature presentations by artist and author Keren Cytter, professor of philosophy Lydia Goehr, and visual artist and writer Jill Magid.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Representation in Art: What Does It Mean?

Discussion | Writing for Children and Young Adults Forum


Anna Meriano is the author of the Love Sugar Magic series, which has received starred reviews from Kirkus, School Library Journal, and Shelf Awareness. A Houston native, she works as a tutor and part time teacher with Writers in the Schools, a Houston nonprofit that brings creative writing instruction into public schools. Laura Silverman is an author and editor. Her works include Girl Out of Water, You Asked for Perfect, and It's a Whole Spiel. Girl Out of Water was a Junior Library Guild Selection. She currently splits her time between Atlanta, Georgia and Brooklyn, New York.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Writing for Children and Young Adults Forum

Book Club | In the Midst of Winter: Three Lives Intersect


Isabel Allende's novel journeys from present-day Brooklyn to Guatemala in the recent past to 1970s Chile and Brazil. In the Midst of Winter is about three very different people who are brought together in a mesmerizing story that offers “a timely message about immigration and the meaning of home” (People). During the biggest Brooklyn snowstorm in living memory, Richard Bowmaster, a lonely university professor in his sixties, hits the car of Evelyn Ortega, a young undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, and what at first seems an inconvenience takes a more serious turn when Evelyn comes to his house, seeking help. At a loss, the professor asks his tenant, Lucia Maraz, a fellow academic from Chile, for her advice. As these three lives intertwine, each will discover truths about how they have been shaped by the tragedies they witnessed, and Richard and Lucia will find unexpected, long overdue love. Allende returns here to themes that have propelled some of her finest work: political injustice, the art of survival, and the essential nature of—and our need for—love.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
7:00 pm

Free
Book Clubs, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, In the Midst of Winter: Three Lives Intersect

Talk | Artist Talk: Art History, Queer Culture, and Post-Colonialism


Salman Toor’s figurative paintings vary in scale and style, ranging in subject from art history, queer culture, and post-colonialism. Toor has had several solo exhibitions in the U.S. and has participated in significant group shows such as the Kochi Biennale 2016. His work is included in the collections of Tate Modern. He is featured both as an artist and a writer in publications such as ArtAsiaPacific, Hyperallergic, Artsy, Wall Street International, and Them Magazine.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Artist Talk: Art History, Queer Culture, and Post-Colonialism

Talk | Creative Writing Lecture


Katie Kitamura's third novel, A Separation, was a New York Times Notable Book and a finalist for the Premio von Rezzori. It was named a Best Book of the Year by over a dozen publications, has been optioned for film, and will be translated into sixteen languages. Her two previous novels, Gone to the Forest and The Longshot, were both finalists for the New York Public Library’s Young Lions Fiction Award. A recipient of fellowships from the Lannan Foundation and Santa Maddalena, Katie has written for publications including The New York Times Book Review, The Guardian, Granta, BOMB, Triple Canopy, and frieze.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 20
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 20, 2019, 02/20/2019, Creative Writing Lecture

Conference | New Fascism Mass Psychology and Financialization


What do the worlds of global finance and nationalist populism have in common? How can we understand the rise of today’s 'new fascisms' through the prism of financialization? This one-day event brings together scholars from across disciplines to debate these key questions for our understanding of contemporary capitalism. The workshop is part of Public Seminar's Imaginal Politics initiative and is organised jointly with the Department of Social Science, University College London. The workshop will include three panel discussions and wiil close with a talk by Judith Butler on anti-gender ideology and the new fascism.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
10:00 am

Free
Conferences, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, New Fascism Mass Psychology and Financialization

Gallery Talk | 2 Folk Art Shows: Exhibition Walkthroughs


A tour of John Dunkley: Neither Day nor Night and Paa Joe: Gates of No Return, led by museum gallery guides.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
1:00 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, 2 Folk Art Shows: Exhibition Walkthroughs

Lecture | What Is Islamophobia? Disentangling Citizens’ Feelings Toward Ethnicity, Religion and Religiosity


What citizens think about Muslim immigrants is of great importance for some of the most pressing challenges facing Western democracies. Advancing our understanding of what “Islamophobia” really is – i.e. whether it is a dislike based on immigrants` ethnic background, their religious identity or their specific religious behaviour – this talk suggests that in general Muslims are not viewed more negatively than Christian immigrants. Instead, citizens’ uneasiness with Muslim immigration is first and foremost the result of a rejection of fundamentalist forms of religiosity. This suggests that common explanations, which are based on simple dichotomies between liberal supporters and conservative critics of immigration, need to be re-evaluated. While the politically left and culturally liberal have more positive attitudes towards immigrants than the right-leaning and conservative, they are also far more critical towards religious groups. The talk concludes that a large part of the current political controversy over Muslim immigration has to do with this double opposition. Importantly, the current political conflict over Muslim immigration is not so much about immigrants versus natives or even Muslim versus Christians as it is about political liberalism versus religious fundamentalism. Speaker Marc Helbling is full professor in political sociology[uni-bamberg.de] at the Department of Political Science at the University of Bamberg and a Research Fellow at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. He was a visiting lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at the Centres for European Studies at Harvard University and New York University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
4:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, What Is Islamophobia? Disentangling Citizens&rsquo; Feelings Toward Ethnicity, Religion and Religiosity

Lecture | Unimagining Communities: Suspicion and the Writing of History in Post-Colonial Societies


The lecture will be presented by Prof. Dilip Menon, the Mellon Chair of Indian Studies and the Director of the Centre for Indian Studies at the University of Witwatersrand in Africa. Menon's research for the past decade has engaged with issues of caste, socialism, and equality in modern India. Currently, he is working on issues of cultural and intellectual history and is engaged in a project on the writing of history in India between 1850 and 1960. The work inaugurated at the Centre is interdisciplinary and transnational in approach and looks afresh at issues of colonialism, modernity, and migration in the Global South.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Unimagining Communities: Suspicion and the Writing of History in Post-Colonial Societies

Discussion | Birthright Citizenship in an Evolving Political Landscape


Birthright citizenship, seen for more than a century as a bedrock American right, has become a hot-button immigration issue. This panel discussion brings together historians, scholars and journalists to discuss how and why birthright citizenship has evolved, from Reconstruction to immigration policy today. They'll explore its impact on the lives of American families over time.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Thu, Feb 21
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Birthright Citizenship in an Evolving Political Landscape

Lecture | Globalization: Promises, Discontents and New Futures


Globalization can also be observed from within. That is from the point in time and in the space in which we are physically placed. This look, which is also that of our everyday life, leads us to see the "global" through the experience of the "local". A local that, precisely because of globalization, and the connectivity that is the main responsible, has profoundly changed compared to that of the past, becoming a hyper-local: a hybrid environment given by the integration of the physical space of proximity (in which we find ourselves and in which we interact with the people and things that are close to us) and the space of global connectivity (the limits of which are determined by the tools we use to see and act in the networks we are part of). By adopting this point of view what we see today is the clash between two trends: a dominant one towards the diffusion of forms of connected and incompetent solitude (tragically unsustainable, both socially and environmentally). And a symmetrical one, which proposes and puts into practice networks of competent collaboration. The lecture by Ezio Manzini discusses how these two trends define our field of action. And, with it, how they affect our life projects and the politics of the everyday that we put in place by confirming or transforming the socio-technical systems we are part of.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Globalization: Promises, Discontents and New Futures

Discussion | Is Higher Education for Everyone?


If college is a pathway to greater equality in our society, what are the obstacles preventing participation by all? What issues do low-income students face in enrolling and succeeding in higher education, particularly graduate school? What role do class, race, economic factors, and pedagogy play, and what are the solutions? Featuring Stephen Brier, professor of urban education and founder of The Interactive Technology and Pedagogy program, co-author of Austerity Blues; Cathy Davidson, distinguished professor and director of the Futures Initiative, author of The New Education; Sakina Laksimi-Morrow, fellow at the Teaching and Learning Center; Richard V. Reeves, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, author of Dream Hoarders; Carla Shedd, associate professor of sociology and urban education, author of Unequal City.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, Is Higher Education for Everyone?

Talk | An Evening with Bestselling Author Sam Lipsyte


Sam Lipsyte is the author of the story collections Venus Drive (named one of the top twenty-five books of its year by Voice Literary Supplement) and The Fun Parts and the novels The Ask, The Subject Steve, and Home Land, which was a New York Times Notable Book and received the first annual Believer Book Award. His latest book is the novel Hark. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, he lives in New York City and teaches at Columbia University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, An Evening with Bestselling Author Sam Lipsyte

Lecture | The Rise of the Sea and the Novel


Does the contemporary French novel have anything to say about climate change? This talk is part of a larger project that considers literature as an ambiguous witness of humans' fragile earthly predicament. Speaker Thangam Ravindranathan is Associate Professor of French Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Behold an Animal. Four Exorbitant Readings (forthcoming, Northwestern University Press, 2019), Là où je ne suis pas. Récits de dévoyage (Presses Universitaires de Vincennes, 2012), and co-author (with Antoine Traisnel) of Donner le change: L'impensé animal (Editions Hermann, 2016). In English.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 21
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 21, 2019, 02/21/2019, The Rise of the Sea and the Novel

Symposium | Year Zero: More-Than-Human Worlding After 1945


1945 marks the end of a world war, the rise of decolonized states, the beginning of an unruly geological epoch. This symposium brings together extraordinary scholars who cross disciplinary boundaries to examine intersecting materialities and unprecedented logics of this postwar rupture, a Year Zero in which humans, nonhumans, and machines were violently remade. Thinking of security and affect through nuclear ruins (Joseph Masco), ecological consequences of growth paradigms (Julie Livingston), queer postcolonial bodies through chemical fertilizers (Vanessa Agard-Jones), remaking of a global South through oranges (Tiago Saraiva), smartness and resilience through infrastructure (Orit Halpern), and the emergence of metadata after the war (Lisa Gitelman), this symposium gathers together a striking array of critical-creative practices for tracing more-than-human worlding and inhabiting their relentless, differential trajectories.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Feb 22
9:00 am

Free
Symposiums, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Year Zero: More-Than-Human Worlding After 1945

Discussion | Amend the 13th: A Conversation about Ending Legalized Slavery in the United States and Abolishing the Prison System As We Know It


Amed the 13th is a national call for fresh thinking about criminal law and policy which places at its center the violence, degradation, trauma and dehumanization inflicted on communities that are targeted by our “criminal injustice system.” Now is the time for those who believe in democratic justice and full citizenship for all Americans to demand that the 13th Amendment’s Punishment Clause be removed from the U.S. Constitution. The 13th Amendment, laws emerging from its ratification (namely the Black Codes), and the resultant social order have been used as tools to enforce discrimination based on class, race, place, and gender. It is clear that there is a relationship between justice matters and racial constructions about White superiority and Black inferiority, and that this relationship fuels the exploitation and disproportionate incarceration of Black and Brown bodies. Moreover, the relationship limits the enjoyment of all the rights and attributes of citizenship by people of color in general and formerly incarcerated people in particular. Moderator: -- Flores A. Forbes, Associate Vice President Strategic Policy and Program Implementation in the Office of Government & Community Affairs Panel: -- Sheena Wright, President and CEO United Way of New York City. She will expand on the United Way literacy campaign and the historical connection of literacy on slavery, emancipation and the contemporary carceral state. -- Kendall Thomas is the Nash Professor of Law and the Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Culture. -- Mika’il DeVeaux, Ph.D., is the founder of Citizens Against Recidivism and a lecturer at Nassau Community College (SUNY).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Feb 22
1:00 pm

Free
Discussions, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Amend the 13th: A Conversation about Ending Legalized Slavery in the United States and Abolishing the Prison System As We Know It

Gallery Talk | Taíno: Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean: Curator's Tour


Explore the living legacy of Native peoples throughout the Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands and their U.S. diasporas with the exhibition's lead curator, Ranald Woodaman from the Smithsonian Latino Center in Washington, D.C.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Feb 22
1:30 pm

Free
Gallery Talks, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Ta&iacute;no: Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean: Curator's Tour

Talk | An Evening with an Experimental Animator


Jodie Mack is an experimental animator, associate professor of animation at Dartmouth College, and a 2018/19 Film Study Center Fellow at Harvard University. Her handmade films use collage to explore the relationship between graphic cinema and storytelling, the tension between form and meaning. Her films study domestic and recycled materials to illuminate the elements shared between fine art abstraction and mass-produced graphic design. Mack’s 16mm films have screened at a variety of venues, including at the Images Festival, Projections at the New York Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, BFI London Film Festival, National Gallery of Art, and International Film Festival Rotterdam, among others.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, Feb 22
6:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, An Evening with an Experimental Animator

Lecture | Tech Is the Instrument: Musicmaking and Technology


From speaker Matam Berkowitz: "How making music led me to technology, using sensors to translate signals from the human body (motion, heartbeat, brainwaves, etc) into sound. How working in technology led me to impact entrepreneurship: building solutions for paralyzed, blind, amputated and autistic individuals to express themselves in new ways, and eventually starting my own company, SHIFT." The talk will feature stories, videos, and insights based on different projects: from interactive art installations for museums to conceptual performances for Google and Microsoft, from collaborations with XPRIZE around the affordable housing crisis to the Blockchain ecosystem to medical devices and rehabilitation. The presentation will end with a live demo of the Airstrument, a device that turns hand movements into music and makes music more intuitive and accessible than ever before. Matan Berkowitz lives in the nexus of art, technology, and positive impact. His award-winning inventions translate physical signals (such as brainwaves, heartbeats and movements) into music, turn everyday objects into instruments and have been displayed at museums, galleries, events, and stages worldwide. Matan regularly speaks and performs for the likes of TED, Google, Microsoft, and Forbes. His presentations often combine live musical demos of his inventions, while his unique workshops focus on Rapid Innovation - turning ideas into reality quickly and effectively, without relying on technology.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Feb 22
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Tech Is the Instrument: Musicmaking and Technology

Lecture | The Realist Case for Eliminating Nuclear Weapons


This talk will dismantle the rationale for keeping nuclear weapons, reframe the debate, and present evidence and arguments demonstrating that eliminating nuclear weapons is not only realistic, but that it is the only pragmatic and prudent policy choice available. Speaker Ward Wilson is a Senior Fellow and director of the Rethinking Nuclear Weapons Project. He is respected internationally for his research into and critiques of the foundations of nuclear weapons thinking and new perspectives. His book, Five Myths about Nuclear Weapons, is a groundbreaking rethinking of nuclear weapons based on recently uncovered and reanalyzed facts from Cold War archives. Wilson has spoken at the State Department, the Pentagon, the U.K. House of Commons, the European Parliament, the Brookings Institution, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, Feb 22
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, The Realist Case for Eliminating Nuclear Weapons

Discussion | Woman in Language: Defining Success


A discussion with: Zizi Majid, Victoria Bailey, Cusi Cram, Diana Fathi, Jessica Hecht, Morgan Jenness, Bonnie Kramen, Meropi Peponides, Jillian Walker, and Linda Winer.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Feb 22
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, February 22, 2019, 02/22/2019, Woman in Language: Defining Success

Lecture | Time Management: Practical Strategies that Can Change Your Life


Want to reduce stress, accomplish more in less time and enjoy greater freedom to do the things you love? Do you want a greater feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment in your daily life? You are not alone! Speaker, trainer, and certified professional coach, Barbara Phillips, will share practical strategies that have the power to change your life! You will learn: • How to focus your time on your priorities • When multi-tasking is helpful or harmful • Secrets to overcoming procrastination • Tips for managing distractions, interruptions and time wasters • Simple strategies and tools for gaining greater control over how you manage and use your time
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Feb 23
2:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 23, 2019, 02/23/2019, Time Management: Practical Strategies that Can Change Your Life

Lecture | New York City Food History - Industrial Foods and Factories


This class is an introduction to the food history of New York City, telling the stories of the edible goods produced, consumed, and venerated in homes and restaurants within the five boroughs. The history of restaurants, the meals of the wealthy and those of the working class, and the foodstuffs on all these plates will be explored. New York City is a city of immigrants, and these diverse groups from around the globe have contributed to a constantly evolving definition of urban food culture. The topic of the second week will be Industrial Foods and Factories. One of the economies most impacted by the industrial revolution in New York City was food production. The peak time for the production of industrial, or packaged, foods originating in NYC was 1860 – 1960. What foods were produced, where were they marketed and distributed? How did these nascent food industry giants such as Nabisco and Domino Sugar re-shape the physical geography of New York City as well as the contents of dinner plates? The Professor: Dr. Shayne Figueroa is a food historian and recently earned her PhD in Food Studies from New York University. Her dissertation examines the social history of the school lunch program in New York City during the postwar period. Shayne has taught undergraduate courses at NYU (Food Issues in Contemporary Society), The New School (Introduction to Food Studies; Kids and Food), and Sterling College.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Sat, Feb 23
3:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 23, 2019, 02/23/2019, New York City Food History - Industrial Foods and Factories

Talk | Resume Help


Need help with resume writing? Not sure how to edit it? Get one-on-one assistance with writing your resume. Please bring a hard copy of your resume or a USB flash drive to save and edit it.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
2:30 pm

Free
Talks, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, Resume Help

Lecture | Korean Film Today


Famed producer Won Dong-Yeon--the creative force behind Along with the Gods and Masquerade--speaks to the state of Korean film today and intricacies of the film industry at home. He also reflects on the power of Korean directors, producers and actors for the global box office.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, Korean Film Today

Lecture | An Overlooked Type Designer on Her Centennial


Gudrun Zapf has been cited as the first woman who made a career as a type designer. Her Diotima type as been called the greatest type of the twentieth century. Yet, despite a couple of monographs, Gudrun Zapf’s work as a calligrapher, type designer, and bookbinder is not very well known. No doubt this is partly due to her being overshadowed by her tremendously talented husband, Hermann Zapf, who also worked in the fields of calligraphy and type design; and partly it is because of Gudrun's modest and self-effacing nature. This lecture will dive deeper into the work of this exceptional artist, who has made a major contribution to the worlds of alphabet design and book art.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, An Overlooked Type Designer on Her Centennial

Discussion | Art and Direct Action


A talk with members of MTL+ collective, Chinatown Art Brigade, and others who will speak on their experiences combining research, aesthetics, organizing and action, followed by a Q&A.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, Art and Direct Action

Discussion | Is Gay Liberation Academic?


A roundtable of university faculty reflect on gay liberation – a movement whose story cannot be told without Stonewall – and consider to what extent liberation is an “academic” question, in both senses of the term. Among the issues to be explored: the contested legacies of Stonewall; the college’s role, then and now; shifts and changes wrought by the last 50 years; and the promises and challenges of queer futures, in and beyond the academy. The panel brings together leading scholars from across campus: -- Kwame Anthony Appiah, Professor of Philosophy and Law, Arts & Science and School of Law -- Caroline Dorsen, Assistant Professor, Rory Meyers School of Nursing -- A.B. Huber, Gallatin School of Individualized Study -- Ann Pellegrini, Professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis, Tisch School of the Arts -- Kenji Yoshino, Chief Justice Warren Professor of Constitutional Law, School of Law
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, Is Gay Liberation Academic?

Discussion | Using Illustration to Represent Diverse Communities


How can illustration be used as a tool to represent diverse communities? How can designers use their work to combat bias and disrupt common stereotypes? Designers, artists, and illustrators will discuss their experiences working with community-based organizations on “popular education materials,” or tools that use visuals and accessible text to make complex issues easy to understand. Hear about lessons learned and how these artists were able to create visual tools that were culturally sensitive and responsive to the communities they were partnering with. With: -- Liziana Cruz -- Njoki Gitahi -- Erin Rommel -- Moderated by Christine Gaspar
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
6:30 pm

$5
Discussions, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, Using Illustration to Represent Diverse Communities

Discussion | We Will Have Been Living Otherwise: Archiving in the Future Perfect Tense


We tend to think of an archive as a repository of memories, things, and documents from the past, or as a technique that turns or arrests the present into a past. What kind of archive safeguards, keeps company with, or “summons,” a past that the present hasn’t yet caught up with? Can such a past or such an archive be summoned to haunt the present as an alternative?
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Feb 25
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 25, 2019, 02/25/2019, We Will Have Been Living Otherwise: Archiving in the Future Perfect Tense

Discussion | Everything but the Food: Real Ideas to Fix Real Problems


Panel discussion exploring what impacts food security and how we are fighting the issues that create food injustice. Panelists: -- Shanna Castillo, Director, Resident Economic Empowerment & Sustainability, NYCHA -- Ray Figueroa-Reyes, President, NYC Community Garden Coalition -- Tony Hillery, Executive Director and Founder, Harlem Grown -- Karen Pearl, President and CEO, God's Love We Deliver -- Moderator: Charles Platkin, executive director of the NYC Food Policy Center
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Feb 26
9:00 am

Free
Discussions, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Everything but the Food: Real Ideas to Fix Real Problems

Discussion | A Legal Empowerment Approach to Addressing Justice Barriers in the U.S. Immigration System


This talk will explore an ongoing participatory evaluation project being carried out by the New Sanctuary Coalition in collaboration with the Global Justice Clinic and Robert L. Bernstein Institute for Human Rights. The collaboration assesses NSC initiatives aimed at building the power and agency of families as they move through the immigration process. NSC stands in solidarity with those facing detention and deportation, who they call “friends” rather than immigrants, and coordinates a network of volunteers who accompany friends to court, provide legal and non-legal advice at a weekly pro-se clinic, and build relationships with NSC friends, seeing up close the violence and injustice of the immigration system. The Global Justice Clinic and Bernstein Institute collaborate with NSC to evaluate the efficacy of the NSC’s approach, with a goal of producing literature highlighting the impact of legal empowerment methods to addressing justice barriers in the U.S. Immigration system.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Feb 26
12:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, A Legal Empowerment Approach to Addressing Justice Barriers in the U.S. Immigration System

Discussion | Disrupting Fashion: Technology and Artificial Intelligence


After a fascinating event last season, a panel of experts further explores the impact technology and artificial intelligence are having on the fashion industry. How will AI contribute to innovations in manufacturing and marketing? What possibilities do new technologies—such as augmented reality, marketing personalization, and big data—create for companies, and what are the risks? Industry mainstays and entrepreneurs discuss the future of fashion. Featuring Zulu Williams, vice president of design for men’s sportswear at Macy’s Merchandising Group, and others.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Feb 26
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Disrupting Fashion: Technology and Artificial Intelligence

Talk | On Camus, Proust and Flaubert


Author Claire Messud will discuss her work, including her most recent novel, The Burning Girl, as well as how French authors such as Albert Camus, Marcel Proust, and Gustave Flaubert have impacted her writings, with Cultural Counselor of the French Embassy in the United States Bénédicte de Montlaur. Messud is a recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe Fellowships and the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Author of six works of fiction, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her family.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Feb 26
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, On Camus, Proust and Flaubert

Lecture | Indigenous Resistance in an Era of Climate Change


Nick Estes delivers insights from the book Our History is the Future. The book examines Indigenous spaces of anti-colonial resistance in the city, the countryside, and the reservation. From police violence to extractive industries, each is deeply connected to environmental justice. A closer look at Native movements shows how deeply connected urban and rural spaces are to decolonization in North America. Estes is Kul Wicasa from the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, an Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico, and a co-founder of the Red Nation, an organization dedicated to Native liberation. He is the author of the forthcoming book Our History is the Future: #NoDAPL, Standing Rock, and the Long Traditions of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019), and edited with Jaskiran Dhillon the forthcoming volume #NoDAPL and Mni Wiconi: Reflections on Standing Rock (University of Minnesota, 2019).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Feb 26
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Indigenous Resistance in an Era of Climate Change

Talk | Photographer Talk: Cultural Identity and Sense of Place


Haruka Sakaguchi’s documentary work focuses on cultural identity and sense of place, and has been published on The New York Times, Time, Open Society Foundations, British Journal of Photography, Burn Magazine, Rangefinder, and Buzzfeed. Presented by MPS Digital Photography as part of its i3: Images, Ideas, Inspiration lecture series. Haruka's recent project 1945 was on display at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo from November 2017 thru November 2018. She was born in Osaka, Japan and immigrated to the US with her parents when she was three months old.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Feb 26
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, Photographer Talk: Cultural Identity and Sense of Place

Talk | A Conversation with Renowned Conductor Herbert Blomstedt


New York Philharmonic President and CEO Deborah Borda engages conductor Herbert Blomstedt in a conversation about the highlights of his career, spanning more than 60 years. Discover the convictions and ethos of one of the most estimable artists of our time prior to his concerts featuring masterworks by Grieg and Dvořák.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Tue, Feb 26
7:30 pm

Free
Talks, February 26, 2019, 02/26/2019, A Conversation with Renowned Conductor Herbert Blomstedt

Lecture | Faith and National Fratricide


Professor David Elcott will discuss insights from a book he is editing with political analyst and theologians in Indonesia, India, Israel, Central Europe and the United States. He will discuss the increased linkage of populism, nationalism and the use of religious identity to fuel anti-democratic values and policies across the globe. He will present findings on how a call to tribalism, xenophobia and anger are gaining strength and how religion is the propellant.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
12:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Faith and National Fratricide

Lecture | Charted Territories and Unmapped Science: How Good Ideas Come Without a Place and Originator


Science and technology are regional and local and hence they have also been told in terms of nations, states and political events. We know such histories. From China in particular: Origins, innovation and creativity all have a place and a time. However, in Chinese history ideas have a history, no origin, trajectories and no creator; innovations are assemblages of the given, novelty can only come from what already exists. Would it be attractive to tell China’s history of science in such terms? What history would it be? And can modern science be told in such terms, and would it mean it would lead to a different science? In my talk I will present my historical research envisage such concerns. Speaker Dagmar Schäfer‘s main interest is the history and sociology of technology of China, focusing on the paradigms configuring the discourse on technological development, past and present. She has published widely on the Premodern history of China (Song-Ming) and technology, materiality, the processes and structures that lead to varying knowledge systems, and the changing role of artefacts—texts, objects, and spaces—in the creation, diffusion, and use of scientific and technological knowledge.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Charted Territories and Unmapped Science: How Good Ideas Come Without a Place and Originator

Conference | Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities


While all disciplines employ narrative in their work to summarize and communicate their theories, methods, and results, the realm of narrating (more colloquially known as storytelling) has traditionally been considered a literary or historical endeavor under the purview of the humanities and social sciences. This is no longer the case. As evidenced by the burgeoning fields of narrative medicine and science communication, narratives and narrating are also important tools for the natural sciences. Neuroscientists have even recently proposed that “narrative” may be a better way of theorizing about the processes by which the brain represents the context used to sort and order memories in order to create a timeline of events. In light of this development, the conference seeks to explore the following topics: -- What “narrative” means, and the role it plays, in the humanities, social sciences, journalism, law, the natural sciences, and medicine. -- Why humans create narratives–perspectives from anthropology to neuroscience. -- Narrating with “qualitative” and with “quantitative” data. -- Communicating to the public through narratives and storytelling.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
6:00 pm

Free
Conferences, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities

Discussion | The Black Experience in America: The Black Aesthetic


The event looks at how today’s creatives use the Black aesthetic to explore and articulate the world through their lens. Frequently, those who contribute and develop the Black Aesthetic compliment social, political and cultural disruptions of hegemonic industries and ideologies—whether intentionally or not—the presentation of Black bodies, thoughts, ideas and creativity offers a perspective that is still embedded in not only the Black experience, but is integral in the American framework. Participants: Sheril Antonio and Ifeona Fulani
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, The Black Experience in America: The Black Aesthetic

Lecture | Dante Without Footnotes: Why Dante Is for Everyone


Why does Dante still speak to us with great urgency and power, and how is it that he remains accessible despite the seemingly-vast distance in time and culture between his world and ours? Lecturer Ron Herzman is Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at SUNY Geneseo and serves as the Director of Education and Outreach for the Dante Society of America. He has taught Dante at Geneseo, at Georgetown, and at Attica Correctional Facility, as well as directing fifteen Summer Seminars for School Teachers on Dante for the National Endowment for the Humanities.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Feb 27
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Dante Without Footnotes: Why Dante Is for Everyone

Talk | Is Poverty a Political Choice?


Since being named the UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights in 2014, speaker Philip Alston has investigated extreme poverty in countries as diverse as Ghana, Mauritania, Chile, China, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In a conversation with former New York Times foreign correspondent Calvin Sims, Alston will share his perspective on what needs to be done to end poverty.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Is Poverty a Political Choice?

Symposium | Screenwriters Sharing Their Experiences


Novelist Richard Russo and a panel of authors-turned-screenwriters discuss the creative challenges involved in writing for the big and small screens. Featuring Ron Currie Rebecca Dinerstein Richard Russo Emily Schultz Richard Russo—whose novels Nobody’s Fool and Empire Falls were adapted for the screen—is joined by three fiction writers who have straddled both the book and film worlds to discuss the process of adapting one’s own works as well as collaborating on original screenplays. Ron Currie is a screenwriter, novelist, and author of the NYPL Young Lions Fiction Award-winning God is Dead;  Rebecca Dinerstein, whose adaptation of her own novel The Sunlit Night premiered at the 2919 Sundance Film Festival; and Emily Schultz is the best-selling author of The Blondes, which is currently in development at AMC, and for which she is the Executive Producer.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
6:30 pm

Free
Symposiums, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Screenwriters Sharing Their Experiences

Discussion | Urban Intersections: Black, Queer Lives in New York City


Few calls to action have been as powerful in movement building as that of the Combahee River Collective in 1977. The collective, composed of Black feminists who identified as and with the working-class and lesbians, demanded an active commitment “to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression,” seeing as their “particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based upon the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking.” Decades later, this intersectional politics helped buoy the Movement for Black lives, Black Lives Matter, Black Youth Project 100, and other 21st century campaigns for racial, gender, class, and sexual justice. In celebration of Black History Month, the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, and the boundless, ongoing relevance of the Combahee River Collective’s message, this event brings together key activists working at the intersections of Black and queer politics in New York City. Panelists: -- Kiara St. James, Co-Founder and ED of New York Trans Advocacy Group -- Kleaver Cruz, Founder, The Black Joy Project -- Jewel Cadet, Black Youth Project 100 -- Moderated By: Ayasha Guerin, New York University, Doctoral Candidate, SCA and Urban Democracy Lab Doctoral Fellow in Urban Practice Note: Our featured image is of Pauli Murray, lawyer, Civil Rights Activist, Episcopal Priest, and (briefly) New Yorker. Murray identified as a lesbian and a recent biographer described her retroactively as “transgender.” Presented as a part of Gallatin’s Black History Month programming.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Urban Intersections: Black, Queer Lives in New York City

Talk | A Conversation with Author Nicholson Baker


Nicholson Baker was born in Manhattan in 1957 and grew up in Rochester, New York. He has published sixteen books—including The Mezzanine (1988), U and I (1991), Human Smoke (2008), The Anthologist (2009), and Substitute (2016)—and his work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper's, The New York Review of Books, Best American Short Stories, and Best American Essays. Baker and his wife Margaret Brentano have two children; they live on the Penobscot River in Maine.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, A Conversation with Author Nicholson Baker

Talk | Artist Talk: New Media Art


Hakan Topal is a new media artist living and working in Brooklyn. He is currently an Assistant Professor of New Media at Purchase College. He has exhibited his work at the 8th and 9th Istanbul Biennials; apexart, New York; Thyssen- Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21), Vienna; Kunst-Werke, Berlin; ZKM Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe; MoMA PS1, New York; Platform, Istanbul, the 9th Gwangju Biennale; and ICP Museum, New York. Topal represented Turkey in various international exhibitions, including the 49th Venice Biennial Turkish Pavilion.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Artist Talk: New Media Art

Discussion | Queer Identity and Creativity


A discussion with five accomplished alumni about how queer identity and the shifting landscape of queer political liberation impacts their work as artists and creatives. Panelists include: Caroline Berler (MFA 2017 Social Documentary) Alexa Cassaro (MFA 2015 Illustration as Visual Essay; BFA 2013 Illustration) Annie Malamet (MFA 2015 Photography, Video and Related Media) Antonio Pulgarin (BFA 2013 Photography) Eric Rhein (MFA 2000 Fine Arts; BFA 1985 Fine Arts).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Feb 27
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, February 27, 2019, 02/27/2019, Queer Identity and Creativity

Conference | Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities


While all disciplines employ narrative in their work to summarize and communicate their theories, methods, and results, the realm of narrating (more colloquially known as storytelling) has traditionally been considered a literary or historical endeavor under the purview of the humanities and social sciences. This is no longer the case. As evidenced by the burgeoning fields of narrative medicine and science communication, narratives and narrating are also important tools for the natural sciences. Neuroscientists have even recently proposed that “narrative” may be a better way of theorizing about the processes by which the brain represents the context used to sort and order memories in order to create a timeline of events. In light of this development, the conference seeks to explore the following topics: -- What “narrative” means, and the role it plays, in the humanities, social sciences, journalism, law, the natural sciences, and medicine. -- Why humans create narratives–perspectives from anthropology to neuroscience. -- Narrating with “qualitative” and with “quantitative” data. -- Communicating to the public through narratives and storytelling.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 28
8:30 am

Free
Conferences, February 28, 2019, 02/28/2019, Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities

Lecture | Swarm Intelligence: From Insects to Humans


Sometimes the whole really is more than the sum of its parts. As humans, we organize ourselves into groups that accomplish more than any of us could alone, and so do many other animals. This is an exploration of these remarkable phenomena, from the construction of nests by ants and wasps, to the schooling of fish and the behavior of human crowds. Guy Theraulaz of the Center for Research in Animal Cognition (Paul Sabatier University, France) shares his influential research about collective behavior in insect societies. He is the co-author of Swarm Intelligence: From Natural to Artificial Systems.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 28
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 28, 2019, 02/28/2019, Swarm Intelligence: From Insects to Humans

Lecture | Women and the Laws: Reading Le Code Noir


Le Code Noir, the body of law advanced by the government of Louis XIV in the world of 17th-century France, is one of the first codified legal documents regarding judicial conduct toward enslaved persons in the French colonies of the New World. As slavery increasingly established an iron-clad relationship between skin color and the absence of human and civil rights, what implications did it have for other colonial powers operating in the Atlantic context? The terrors of Le Code Noir for the bonded female and her children were determined by the dictum “partus sequitur ventrem”, Latin for “that which is brought forth follows the womb”. The codification of hereditary racial slavery highlights the contradictions that throw into crisis our entire understanding today of the repertoire of intimacy and sentimentality. Speaker Hortense Spillers is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt chair in English at Vanderbilt University; on leave this year from her home institution, she is serving this semester as the M.H. Abrams distinguished visiting professor in English at Cornell University where she taught from 1987 to 2006. Her essay collection, Black, White, and in Color: Essays on American Literature and Culture appeared in 2003 and has been the subject of various symposiums and critiques.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Feb 28
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, February 28, 2019, 02/28/2019, Women and the Laws: Reading Le Code Noir

Conference | Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities


While all disciplines employ narrative in their work to summarize and communicate their theories, methods, and results, the realm of narrating (more colloquially known as storytelling) has traditionally been considered a literary or historical endeavor under the purview of the humanities and social sciences. This is no longer the case. As evidenced by the burgeoning fields of narrative medicine and science communication, narratives and narrating are also important tools for the natural sciences. Neuroscientists have even recently proposed that “narrative” may be a better way of theorizing about the processes by which the brain represents the context used to sort and order memories in order to create a timeline of events. In light of this development, the conference seeks to explore the following topics: -- What “narrative” means, and the role it plays, in the humanities, social sciences, journalism, law, the natural sciences, and medicine. -- Why humans create narratives–perspectives from anthropology to neuroscience. -- Narrating with “qualitative” and with “quantitative” data. -- Communicating to the public through narratives and storytelling.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 1
8:30 am

Free
Conferences, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities

Slide Lecture | Sticky Shedding: Exorcising Teenage Media


In the mid-1990s, speaker Kristen Gallerneaux attended Bealart, a full-time experimental public arts high school in London, Ontario, Canada. Founded in the late-1920s, the school promoted free expression and immersive self-motivated learning at the secondary school level - an environment that can be hellish for many. While a student, Gallerneaux specialized in analog film processes and made short pastoral horror movies. Forgotten in a basement box for over 20 years, these films and others were recently digitized and will be viewed for the first time during this talk, for better or worse. Other topics will touch on foundational influences linked to media histories: growing up a 1980s arcade, TV horror hosts, video diaries made in isolation, embracing the glitch, the exorcism of memories, and the anxiety of forgetting. Kristen Gallerneaux is a Detroit-based writer and sound-based artist. At The Henry Ford Museum she is curator of technology and keeper of objects such as experimental televisions, prototype synthesizers, prison radios, and hacking devices. Essays about the hidden soundscapes of these artefacts - combined with stories about growing up Spiritualist - form the backbone of her recent book, High Static, Dead Lines (MIT/ Strange Attractor Press).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 1
12:30 pm

Free
Slide Lectures, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, Sticky Shedding: Exorcising Teenage Media

Discussion | The Secrets of Publishing: A Reading and Panel Discussion


With: Erin Hosier has been a literary agent since 2001, formerly at The Gernert Company before moving to Dunow, Carlson & Lerner in 2007. She primarily works with nonfiction authors and has a special interest in popular culture, music biography, humor, women's issues and memoir. Daniel Jones has edited the Modern Love column in the Sunday Styles section of The New York Times since its inception in October 2004. His books include two essay anthologies, Modern Love and The Bastard on the Couch, and a novel, After Lucy. Rakesh Satyal is a Senior Editor at Atria Books, a division of Simon & Schuster. He held previous positions at Doubleday and HarperCollins and spent three years working as a naming specialist in the world of branding. He has sat on the advisory board for the annual PEN World Voices Festival and has taught in the publishing program at New York University. Rob Spillman is Editor and co-founder of Tin House, a twenty-year-old literary magazine. He is the 2017 recipient of the CLMP Energizer Award for Exceptional Acts of Literary Citizenship, the 2015 PEN/Nora Magid Award for Editing as well as the 2015 VIDO Award from VIDA. His memoir, All Tomorrow’s Parties, was published by Grove Press in 2016. Susan Shapiro, an award-winning writing professor, freelances for The New York Times, New York Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Elle, and Oprah.com. She's the bestselling author/coauthor of twelve books her family hates including Five Men Who Broke My Heart, Lighting Up, Unhooked, The Bosnia List and The Byline Bible.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 1
5:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, The Secrets of Publishing: A Reading and Panel Discussion

Discussion | Leading from the Front: Museums and Changing Social Dynamics


Panelists:  Amy Sadao, Director, ICA Philadelphia Martha Tedeschi, Director, Harvard Art Museums Richard Aste, Director, McNay Art Museum Moderator: Sarah Douglas, Editor In Chief, ARTnews    
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 1
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, Leading from the Front: Museums and Changing Social Dynamics

Discussion | Grammy Winning Jazz Vocalist Kurt Elling’s The Big Blind


This pre-concert discussion provides background on Kurt Elling’s “The Big Blind,” a radio-style musical drama written by Kurt Elling and Phil Galdston, in which a young jazz singer faces the ultimate test. Kurt Elling has been nominated for ten Grammy Awards, winning Best Vocal Jazz Album for Dedicated to You (2009). Elling often leads the Down Beat magazine Critics' Poll. He has collaborated often with pianist Laurence Hobgood, leading a quartet that tours throughout the world.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 1
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, Grammy Winning Jazz Vocalist Kurt Elling&rsquo;s The Big Blind

Lecture | On the Crest of Fear: The V-2s, the Battle of the Bulge, and the Closing Months of the Second World War


A talk by Tami Davis Biddle. Dr. Biddle is a Professor of National Security at the U.S. Army War College (USAWC), in Carlisle, PA. She was the Hoyt S. Vandenberg Professor of Aerospace Studies at the USAWC from 2011-13. Prior to that, she was the 2005-07 George C. Marshall Professor of Military Studies at the USAWC and the 2001-02 Harold K. Johnson Visiting Professor of Military History at the U.S. Army’s Military History Institute. She taught in the Department of History at Duke University, where she was a core faculty member of the Joint Program in Military History.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 1
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 01, 2019, 03/01/2019, On the Crest of Fear: The V-2s, the Battle of the Bulge, and the Closing Months of the Second World War

Gallery Talk | Twenty-six: Photographs as Text


Comprised of 26 stoic photographs installed in a seemingly melodic rhythm, Sam Margevicius’s solo exhibition challenges the boundaries of collective versus individual experience in modern daily life. Through repetition, simplicity of composition, and unexpected interruptions, Margevicius asks viewers to slow down and read the images as if they were text. The work presents a myriad of possible narratives, calibrating the intellectual rigor of today’s audience. Through sparse compositional shifts and methodical image placement Margevicius nods toward contemplation versus scrolling, inviting viewers to indulge in an introspective pause. The artist will discuss his work and show.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Mar 2
11:00 am

Free
Gallery Talks, March 02, 2019, 03/02/2019, Twenty-six: Photographs as Text

Discussion | Blockchain: The Post-Hype Future


While it may look like we’re in blockchain lull after the crypto boom of early 2018, there are those who argue that we’re now in the very earliest stages of blockchain development, its use cases, and capabilities of the technology — that we’re seeing the birth of the real blockchain. This event brings together a panel of experts from IBM Blockchain Garage, ConsenSys Labs, Kadena, and more to map out the next phase of blockchain, its practical applications, and untapped opportunities, all in an evening of discussion and ideas that makes NYC a hub for blockchain innovation.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 4
6:00 pm

$5
Discussions, March 04, 2019, 03/04/2019, Blockchain: The Post-Hype Future

Lecture | Comic Books Writer Talks About His Experiences


New York Times best-selling writer of comic books and animation, Brenden Fletcher will be discussing his career in comics and offering advice to those interested in the industry.  Writer Brenden Fletcher's current projects include Motor Crush and Isola and Ghost in the Shell: Global Neural Network. Previous work includes the New York Times best-selling Batgirl of Burnside, Gotham Academy and Entertainment Weekly's "Best New Series" of 2015, Black Canary, all for DC Comics. 
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 4
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 04, 2019, 03/04/2019, Comic Books Writer Talks About His Experiences

Discussion | The Legacy of a Movement: Stonewall to Now


As one moment in LGBTQ+ history, the riots at Stonewall Inn were a critical milestone that incited and advanced LGBTQ+ movements in the United States and beyond. This event will engage LGBTQ+ activists from across the generations in dialogue and narrative sharing about what the fight for LGBTQ+ rights has looked like over the past 50 years since Stonewall.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 4
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 04, 2019, 03/04/2019, The Legacy of a Movement: Stonewall to Now

Talk | Songs of Bukovina: A Conversation with American Ballet Theatre's Alexei Ratmansky, former director of the Bolshoi Theater's Ballet


In celebration of Alexei Ratmansky’s 10th anniversary as American Ballet Theatre's Artist in Residence, ABT presents a special conversation with Ratmansky that will situate his famed piece, Songs of Bukovina, within its cultural and political contexts. Set to the music of Leonid Desyatnikov, Songs of Bukovina explores the folk traditions of the Eastern European mountains. Alexei Osipovich Ratmansky (Russian: Алексей Осипович Ратманский, born August 27, 1968 in Leningrad) was the director of the Bolshoi Theater's Ballet from 2004 to 2008.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Mon, Mar 4
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 04, 2019, 03/04/2019, Songs of Bukovina: A Conversation with American Ballet Theatre's Alexei Ratmansky, former director of the Bolshoi Theater's Ballet

Book Discussion | Why Radomir Konstantinović's The Philosophy of Parochialism Matters Today


This year marks the 50th anniversary of Konstantinović’s book, relevant not only in Serbia and countries of the former Yugoslavia, but also beyond in the context of our global world. It offers a new analysis of the causes of totalitarianism, as well as an innovative methodology of the political reading of literature, specifically poetry. With: -- Branislav Jakovljević, Professor and Department Chair at the Theater and Performance Studies at Stanford. -- Branka Arsić, Charles and Lynn Zhang Professor of English and Comparative Literature.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 4
7:00 pm

Free
Book Discussions, March 04, 2019, 03/04/2019, Why Radomir Konstantinović's The Philosophy of Parochialism Matters Today

Gallery Talk | Twenty-six: Photographs as Text


Comprised of 26 stoic photographs installed in a seemingly melodic rhythm, Sam Margevicius’s solo exhibition challenges the boundaries of collective versus individual experience in modern daily life. Through repetition, simplicity of composition, and unexpected interruptions, Margevicius asks viewers to slow down and read the images as if they were text. The work presents a myriad of possible narratives, calibrating the intellectual rigor of today’s audience. Through sparse compositional shifts and methodical image placement Margevicius nods toward contemplation versus scrolling, inviting viewers to indulge in an introspective pause. The artist will discuss his work and show.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 5
11:00 am

Free
Gallery Talks, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, Twenty-six: Photographs as Text

Talk | What Is the Role of the Private Sector in Building Resilience Against Climate-Related Disasters?


Chloe Demrovsky, President and Chief Executive Officer of Disaster Recovery Institute International, will discuss how the large-scale consequences of a disaster make cooperation between the public and private sectors imperative to success in building resilient communities.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 5
12:30 pm

Free
Talks, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, What Is the Role of the Private Sector in Building Resilience Against Climate-Related Disasters?

Lecture | African-American Genealogy


From 1565 to 1790, Africans surpassed Europeans among the roughly one million newcomers to what would become the United States. A majority of these nearly 360,000 men and women crossed in bondage. Centuries of local and federal laws related to the livelihood of black Americans have created a complex paper trail of genealogical resources. This class aims to provide introductory historical context and recommend basic research methods in the pursuit of African-American family history.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 5
2:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, African-American Genealogy

Lecture | Black and White with Red Sauce: Spaghetti alla Tarantino


Quentin Tarantino’s indebtedness to the spaghetti western and its masters, Sergio Corbucci and Sergio Leone in particular, is well-known. Elements of that genre appear in Django Unchained (2012) and The Hateful Eight (2015). The American director’s penchant for violence and gratuitous bloodshed has resulted in criticism at home and abroad, but his films have stimulated debate on issues such as racism and the legacy of slavery in the United States. As Tarantino shifts direction from the western frontier to the south and back to the west, he remains true to the ideological origins of the spaghetti western by combining trenchant political commentary with entertainment. Race is a main ingredient in both these “macaroni” films. A lecture by Mary Ann McDonald Carolan, Visiting Professor
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 5
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 05, 2019, 03/05/2019, Black and White with Red Sauce: Spaghetti alla Tarantino

Discussion | Understanding the Refugee and Immigrant Experience: Sharing Stories and Perspectives from the Field


In our current political climate, it is important to move beyond sound bites in our understandings of the realities of refugees and immigrants. This panel discussion will have the opportunity to listen to and learn from the stories and perspectives of current and former refugee students and community members, school-based educators and legal experts. They will share the challenges many of our students face as well as the kinds of supports that schools are putting into place to support and advocate for refugee and immigrant communities in these turbulent times.  Panelists: •    Abdul Alargha, Speaker and asylum-seeker from Syria •    Berena Cabarcas: Principal of International Community High School, Bronx, NYC •    Stephanie Delia:  Managing Attorney for City Council Services •    Gloria Jaramillo: Counselor at Brentwood High School, Long Island •    Bnyad Sharef:  Activist, Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 6
5:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, Understanding the Refugee and Immigrant Experience: Sharing Stories and Perspectives from the Field

Lecture | One Long Vision of Beauty: Italy and Aesthetics in Edith Wharton


Speaker Emily Orlando is Professor of English at Fairfield University, where she has taught since 2007. She is the author of Edith Wharton and the Visual Arts as well as articles published in the following peer-reviewed journals and essay collections. She is currently editing Volume 6 of The Complete Works of Edith Wharton: Writings on Architecture, Design, and Gardens for Oxford University Press.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 6
5:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, One Long Vision of Beauty: Italy and Aesthetics in Edith Wharton

Discussion | Planning La Nueva Ciudad in Guayaquil, Ecuador: The Rehabilitation of the Guayaquil Airport


In 1920 Guayaquil, Ecuador was a relatively small city in South America of 30 square kilometers and a population of 258,000. Today at 215 square kilometers, Guayaquil is a sprawling metropolis of 2.29 million. The city suffers from many classic challenges seen around the world: informal communities, urban sprawl, lack of adequate public services and transit. This explosive growth enveloped the city’s airport (240 hectares) which is now being relocated outside the city center. This lecture reviews the city’s ambitious plan to rehabilitate this massive lot at the geographical heart of the city. We will also consider questions such as: What has the city learned from others around the globe? Can they set themselves on a sustainable path for the future? Can they reconcile the challenges of the present day with a vision for a better life for the city and its people? The people of Guayaquil do not merely want to become on par with the best urbanizations in the developed world—they aim to become a showpiece for global development and to create the city of their dreams.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 6
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, Planning La Nueva Ciudad in Guayaquil, Ecuador: The Rehabilitation of the Guayaquil Airport

Discussion | Rape Culture and Sexual Violence in the Arts


In 2006, activist Tarana Burke originated Me Too as a slogan of empathy and solidarity with victims of sexual harassment and assault. More than a decade later, #MeToo has grown into a movement confronting rape culture and its manifestation across the arts and other work and social environments. This discussion digs into the impact that these developments have had on dance artists and institutions and the possibilities for justice and personal healing. Guest Host: Yasemin Ozumerzifon Core Participants: Adrienne Truscott, Alexandra Beller, mayfield brooks, Jules Skloot, Qurrat Ann Kadwani
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 6
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, Rape Culture and Sexual Violence in the Arts

Discussion | Workers and Wages in America Today -- Featuring Nobel-Winning New York Times Columnist Paul Krugman


In this time of low unemployment, why is it so hard for American workers to make a living? Why haven’t the economy’s gains of the recent past meant higher wages for everyone? A panel of experts examines the power, or weakness, of the American worker—looking at factors such as features of U.S. markets, technology, globalization, gendered wage patterns, and the decline of unions. Featuring Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize–winning economist, New York Times columnist, and distinguished professor; Heidi Shierholz, senior economist and director of policy at The Economic Policy Institute; Arindrajit Dube, professor of economics at UMass Amherst; and others.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Mar 6
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, Workers and Wages in America Today -- Featuring Nobel-Winning New York Times Columnist Paul Krugman

Lecture | Dante and the Power of Satire


Dante is one of the greatest satirists of all time. His satire challenged and reshaped moral, legal, and linguistic boundaries. Popes, kings and members of Italy's most powerful families are placed in his upside-down world. Yet, he managed to get away with it. How did he achieve that? How did he manage to justify the use of a language so violent, and so offensive? Speaker Ambrogio Camozzi Pistoja is Assistant Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures (Italian) at Harvard. He studies the literary, visual and criminal history of insults in Roman and medieval Italian societies.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 6
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, Dante and the Power of Satire

Talk | The Raw Truth About Cooking


All human cultures use cooking and other means to process food. Why is food processing so universal? And why might it threaten our health today? Rachel Carmody explains how processing increases the calories we extract from food, ways this practice has given humans an evolutionary edge, and why it may present challenges for our present and future. Rachel Carmody is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. Her work seeks to understand how the human body acquires and utilizes energy, and how past changes in energy budget have shaped human evolution.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 6
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 06, 2019, 03/06/2019, The Raw Truth About Cooking

Lecture | National Self-Determination during the Russian Civil War: The Views of Constitutional-Democratic Émigrés


A talk with Julia Klimova of University College London revolving around the Constitutional-Democratic (Kadet) Party during the Russian Civil War. Drawing from archival research involving the papers of Kadet émigrés, Klimova will focus on how the Kadets reacted to the emergence of nation-states within the Russian Empire in the aftermath of the First World War. She will also explore how the Kadet Party's policies were intertwined with the wider context of the Russian Civil War and the Whites' struggle against Bolshevism.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
12:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, National Self-Determination during the Russian Civil War: The Views of Constitutional-Democratic &Eacute;migr&eacute;s

Discussion | Roma and Contemporary Mexican Cinema


This roundtable will discuss Roma, Alfonso Cuarón's film, which is nominated for 10 Oscars. With: -- Carlos A. Gutiérrez is a film/video programmer, cultural promoter and arts consultant based in New York City. -- Jerry Carlson is Director of the Cinema Studies Program in the Department of Media & Communication Arts at The City College.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
4:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Roma and Contemporary Mexican Cinema

Talk | Diplomats vs. Dissent: Israel and the Politics of Palestine in 1950s America


Geoffrey Levin will deliver this talk.     
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
4:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Diplomats vs. Dissent: Israel and the Politics of Palestine in 1950s America

Lecture | Multilingualism, Global Citizenship, and the Civic Promise of Higher Education


The shift from “citizenship” to “global citizenship” in university missions can be explained by the need to prepare graduates to enter the arena of economic and cultural globalization. This talk examines how the production of global citizenship intersects with the civic promise of higher education.   Speaker Amy J. Wan is Associate Professor of English at Queens College. She is the author of Producing Good Citizens: Literacy Training in Anxious Times (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
4:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Multilingualism, Global Citizenship, and the Civic Promise of Higher Education

Conference | Inequality: Ancient and Modern


5:15 PM  Welcome and Introduction                 Matthew Santirocco 5:30 PM  Keynote Address: A Brief History of Inequality                 Walter Scheidel (Stanford University) 6:30 PM  Discussion                 Walter Scheidel (Stanford University)                 David Stasavage 7:00 PM  Reception               Friday, March 8, 2019      10:15 AM ‘The Greatest of All Plagues’: Plato on Economic Inequality                      David Lay Williams (DePaul University) 11:00 AM  Taxing Rich and Poor in the Ancient Mediterranean                   Andrew Monson (NYU) 11:45 AM  Piketty’s Dilemma: Taxation in Fourth Century Athens                   Dorothea Rohde (Universität Bielefeld) 12:30 PM  Lunch 1:30 PM    Ancient Equality and Modern Inequalities: Reflections on  the Jury Trial in Ancient Greece and Contemporary America                    Sara Forsdyke (University of Michigan) 2:15 PM   The Measure and Mismeasure of Inequality                  Walter Scheidel (Stanford University) 3:00 PM   Political Inequality: Ancient and Modern                  Melissa Schwartzberg (NYU)                  David Stasavage (NYU)   This conference is cosponsored by the NYU College of Arts and Science and by the Department of Classics.   This event is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is required. To RSVP, please visit: as.nyu.edu/ancientstudies/news.html For more information, contact the NYU Center for Ancient Studies at 212.992.7978 or ancient.studies@nyu.edu Inequality: Ancient and Modern   Date: Thursday, March 7, 2019 Time: 5:30pm to 4:00pm March 7 - 8, 2019 EST Location: Hemmerdinger Hall, Silver Center for Arts and Science Contact: For more information, contact the NYU Center for Ancient Studies at 212.992.7978 or ancient.studies@nyu.edu Contact ancient.studies@nyu.edu Cost: Free Calendar: NYU Arts and Science File under: lecture, politics, Ancient Studies, Classics, economics, conference, Ancient Greece, Center for Ancient Studies, Conversations in the Social Sciences Share Add to my calendar
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
5:15 pm

Free
Conferences, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Inequality: Ancient and Modern

Talk | Conversation On Radical Feminism


This is a conversation with Barbara Smith, Keeanga-Yahmatta Taylor, and Barbara Ransby in which they elevate the voices of path-breaking radical Black feminists and discuss how to carry their philosophies for freedom into the future.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Conversation On Radical Feminism

Lecture | Delectable Venice: Desiring and Encountering 'La Serenissima' Through Cuisine and Cinema


The talk, dedicated to learning from Venice, will treat Venice as a cultural text in which food and cinema are central to how we encounter and desire it. Addressed to food and wine lovers, to cinephiles, and, above all, to travelers who wish to question their touristic identity and to stage profound encounters with La Serenissima, the talk will take the form of a “celluloid feast” in which scenes of Italians and Venetians at table will be screened and closely analyzed with attention to the “food operas” through which Italians stage their family life and use food as a language with which to create community and to perform their cultural identity. Particular attention will be paid to films set in Venice that represent the food experiences and interpersonal encounters of Venetians and/or tourists – gourmets in search of “aristopiatti,” foodies fetishized by the variations on radicchio on the menu at Taverna La Fenice, gluttons magnetized by polenta, and romantic travelers who use food as seduction. They will screen clips from canonic tourist films such as Summertime and The Tourist. A lecture by Pellegrino D’Acierno, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature and Italian Studies, Hofstra University  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
6:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Delectable Venice: Desiring and Encountering 'La Serenissima' Through Cuisine and Cinema

Discussion | Rape Culture and Sexual Violence in the Arts


In 2006, activist Tarana Burke originated Me Too as a slogan of empathy and solidarity with victims of sexual harassment and assault. More than a decade later, #MeToo has grown into a movement confronting rape culture and its manifestation across the arts and other work and social environments. This discussion digs into the impact that these developments have had on dance artists and institutions and the possibilities for justice and personal healing. Guest Host: Yasemin Ozumerzifon Core Participants: Adrienne Truscott, Alexandra Beller, mayfield brooks, Jules Skloot, Qurrat Ann Kadwani
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, Rape Culture and Sexual Violence in the Arts

Talk | The Future of Education and Civic Engagement for the Latino Community in America


Dr. Luis R. Fraga, Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership and Director of the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame, talks about his leadership journey, and the future of education and civic engagement for the Latino community in America.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 7
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, March 07, 2019, 03/07/2019, The Future of Education and Civic Engagement for the Latino Community in America

Conference | Inequality: Ancient and Modern


10:15 AM ‘The Greatest of All Plagues’: Plato on Economic Inequality                      David Lay Williams (DePaul University) 11:00 AM  Taxing Rich and Poor in the Ancient Mediterranean                   Andrew Monson 11:45 AM  Piketty’s Dilemma: Taxation in Fourth Century Athens                   Dorothea Rohde (Universität Bielefeld) 12:30 PM  Lunch 1:30 PM    Ancient Equality and Modern Inequalities: Reflections on  the Jury Trial in Ancient Greece and Contemporary America                    Sara Forsdyke (University of Michigan) 2:15 PM   The Measure and Mismeasure of Inequality                  Walter Scheidel (Stanford University) 3:00 PM   Political Inequality: Ancient and Modern                  Melissa Schwartzberg                  David Stasavage              
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 8
10:15 am

Free
Conferences, March 08, 2019, 03/08/2019, Inequality: Ancient and Modern

Lecture | New Genre Emerging: Contemporary German Graphic Literature


By now, comics have taken their place alongside other recognized forms of literature, even in German-speaking countries. The renowned German publishing house Suhrkamp includes graphic literature in its program and comic festivals are organized by literary centers. When Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus. A Survivor’s Tale became the first comic to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1992, it became clear that comics can even narrate the Shoah. This talk will guide the audience through the fascinating world of images and stories found in German-language comics and graphic novels of recent years. Speaker Stefan Börnchen was a collaborateur scientifique at the University of Luxembourg, has taught at the University of Cologne since 2011, and is currently a Visiting Professor for Modern German Literature at the Free University of Berlin.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 8
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 08, 2019, 03/08/2019, New Genre Emerging: Contemporary German Graphic Literature

Lecture | Pasolini After Dante: La Divina Mimesis and the Politics of Representation


In the early 1960s, Pier Paolo Pasolini started his rewriting of Dante’s Divine Comedy, La Divina Mimesis. The aim of the project was to make it a new contemporary Comedia, including circles, sins, and characters inspired by Dante. Yet the project was never completed as originally planned. In Fall 1975, Pasolini decided to publish the notes he had written over a decade as a ‘document’. The final text was published by Einaudi in November, a few days after Pasolini’s death. What has been considered for decades as a minor and ultimately failed work in Pasolini’s career is probably the most significant retrospective testimony the author left us on his concept of realism and his authorial subject. La Divina Mimesis is in fact the outward sign of a sustained dialogue with Dante on representation, whose roots reach down into the early 1950s. In this talk, Emanuela Patti of the University of London will explore some examples of Pasolini’s appropriation of Dante’s realism and how they relate to postwar Italian debates.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 8
6:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 08, 2019, 03/08/2019, Pasolini After Dante: La Divina Mimesis and the Politics of Representation

Lecture | Countering Kleptocracy in Ukraine: The Battle at Home and in the West


How much progress has been made in tackling corruption in Ukraine since the Maidan Revolution of 2014? How have Western actors, institutions and professional service providers enabled Ukraine’s transnational corruption networks? And what changes in Western policy are required to further support Ukraine's, especially as the country heads towards presidential elections? Featuring one of the country’s leading anti-corruption advocates and practitioners: Daria Kaleniuk, co-founder of the Anti-corruption Action Centre in Ukraine.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 11
12:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 11, 2019, 03/11/2019, Countering Kleptocracy in Ukraine: The Battle at Home and in the West

Discussion | Corruption and Kleptocracy: The Scourge of Eastern Europe


Western “enablement” of corruption and kleptocracy in Eastern Europe has been said to frustrate democratic political development in Eastern Europe. This is a panel discussion with Eastern European experts Charles Davidson, publisher of The American Interest magazine; Nino Evgenidze, Executive Director at the Economic Policy Research Center in Tbilisi, Georgia; Daria Kaleniuk, co-founder of the Anti-corruption Action Centre, Ukraine; and Miranda Patrucic, an investigative reporter based in Sarajevo. Professor Jenik Radon will moderate.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 11
6:15 pm

Free
Discussions, March 11, 2019, 03/11/2019, Corruption and Kleptocracy: The Scourge of Eastern Europe

Discussion | A Streak of Violet: LGBTQ+ History within New York University


With the Stonewall Riots on its doorstep 50 years ago, New York University was confronted before most universities and institutions with the question of how to respond to requests and demands for gay, lesbian, and transgender rights. Join this panel of current NYU administrators, retirees, alumni, and others as we relive the history of human rights struggles from these front lines. Gathering for the first time oral histories, items from University archives, student collections, and dramatic firsthand accounts presented live, this event will leave you with stories you’ve only imagined about the excitement and persistence of how rights are actually won.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 11
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 11, 2019, 03/11/2019, A Streak of Violet: LGBTQ+ History within New York University

Book Club | Less: When the Answer Is Running Away


Andrew Sean Greer's novel asks: who says you can't run away from your problems? You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can't say yes—it would be too awkward—and you can't say no—it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 11
7:00 pm

Free
Book Clubs, March 11, 2019, 03/11/2019, Less: When the Answer Is Running Away

Talk | Foodscaping in the City: A New Approach to the Urban Landscape


Author and horticulturist Brie Arthur in a discussion on transforming communities, the environment, and food production. Arthur is a passionate leader in the foodscape movement, a model of community development that incorporates sustainable, local food production. She speaks on a variety of horticulture topics around the country and has appeared as a correspondent on the PBS television show Growing A Greener World.   
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 12
6:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 12, 2019, 03/12/2019, Foodscaping in the City: A New Approach to the Urban Landscape

Talk | Adventures in Italian Opera: A Conversation with Met Mezzo-Soprano Jamie Barton


The fifth Adventure in Italian Opera with Fred Plotkin of this season features American mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, who will be singing the role of Fricka in Wagner's Ring of the Nibelung at the Metropolitan Opera.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 12
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, March 12, 2019, 03/12/2019, Adventures in Italian Opera:&nbsp;A Conversation with Met Mezzo-Soprano Jamie Barton

Slide Lecture | Dance Through Time: Antiquity and the Ballets Russes


The lecture is held in conjunction with the exhibition Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes. With: -- Clare Fitzgerald, Associate Director for Exhibitions and Gallery Director -- Rachel Herschman Co-curator, Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 12
7:00 pm

Free
Slide Lectures, March 12, 2019, 03/12/2019, Dance Through Time: Antiquity and the Ballets Russes

Talk | Photographer Talk: Obsessed wit hthe New York Skyline


Photographer and photo editor Gary Hershorn will discuss his obsessive relationship to the New York skyline and how his personal workflow, with an emphasis on the use of smartphone apps, helps him render its landscape in a bold and graphic manner.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 12
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 12, 2019, 03/12/2019, Photographer Talk: Obsessed wit hthe New York Skyline

Discussion | What Can Be Done About Inequality?


The trend of rising inequality in our country shows no end in sight. What can be done to reverse extreme inequality in the United States? What is possible in this age of tax cuts for the wealthy? Would putting a cap on earnings be an effective and practical solution? Two experts with new books bring fresh ideas to the topic: Chuck Collins, author of Is Inequality in America Irreversible? and Sam Pizzigati, author of The Case for a Maximum Wage. They join a discussion with Janet Gornick, professor of political science and sociology and director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 13
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 13, 2019, 03/13/2019, What Can Be Done About Inequality?

Lecture | The ‘Unique-Traditional’ in Poetry, Life, and Translation


Sophia Parnok was a poet who resisted modernism, but her stylistically “traditional” poems express a unique point of view in Russian poetry. Conversely, Parnok’s one-time lover, Marina Tsvetaeva, staunchly resisted traditional poetic diction, yet each of her stylistically “unique” long poems basically tells the same time-worn lyrical story. This paradox is a central concern of Professor Diana Burgin's recent book on Tsvetaeva’s long poems, Five Hard Pieces. In this talk, Burgin will discuss certain “unique-traditional” passages in these poems in order to show how some of them seem to deny a rather ordinary long-dead love affair while all of them resist conventional translation of their unique living words.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 14
4:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 14, 2019, 03/14/2019, The &lsquo;Unique-Traditional&rsquo; in Poetry, Life, and Translation

Lecture | How are Immigrants, Conservatives, and Public Policy Interacting at the Grassroots?


Based on original research, the seminar links the problems immigrants face in integrating in new communities across eight states in the US. The seminar will focus on evaluating for the audience how public policy makers and communities have aimed to welcome immigrants through public policy, on the one hand, and resist immigrant integration on the other. Specific attention will be paid to recent conservative policies (focused on education) and politics (linked to the Tea Party) as they relate to the rising population of immigrants using county-level data.   Speaker Heath Brown is associate professor of public policy at John Jay College.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 14
4:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 14, 2019, 03/14/2019, How are Immigrants, Conservatives, and Public Policy Interacting at the Grassroots?

Discussion | Fashion as Cultural Heritage


A panel discussion about fashion museums, the fashion industry, and the cultural heritage of fashion. Panelists will include Dr. Valerie Steele, director of the museum; Professor Susan Scafidi, director of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham University; and moderator Felicia Caponigri, an American lawyer and PhD student at IMT School for Advanced Studies in Lucca, Italy.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 14
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 14, 2019, 03/14/2019, Fashion as Cultural Heritage

Discussion | Empowering Exploited Indigenous Women of North America


Five Indigenous women will discuss the impact of trafficking and exploitation on Indigenous women, as it relates to their current North American crisis, mineral extraction, land, water, prostitution, and the historical exploitation and attempted genocide of their people. Four of the five panelists are survivors of trafficking, and all are advocates to end the exploitation of land, water, and Indigenous women and girls. They will speak to the lack of systems protections for exploited Native women, and end with strategies to assist Indigenous survivors and stop the sexual exploitation of Indigenous women and girls.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 14
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 14, 2019, 03/14/2019, Empowering Exploited Indigenous Women of North America

Lecture | Why Care About What There Is?


There’s the question of what there is, and then there’s the question of what ultimately exists. Many contend that, once we have this distinction clearly in mind, we can see that there is no sensible debate to be had about whether there are such things as properties or tables or numbers, and that the only ontological question worth debating is whether such things are ultimate (in one or another sense).  Speaker Daniel Korman argues that this is a mistake. Taking debates about ordinary objects as a case study, he shows that the arguments that animate these debates bear directly on the question of which objects there are and cannot plausibly be recast as arguments about what’s ultimate.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 15
3:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 15, 2019, 03/15/2019, Why Care About What There Is?

Discussion | Writing Across Genres


A panel discussion with:   Mira Jacob’s debut novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers selection. Her graphic memoir Good Talk is forthcoming from One World in March 2019. Alexandra Machinist is a partner and literary agent at ICM Partners in New York City. She represents best-selling authors across all genres around the world. Lisa Pearson is the founder of Siglio Press, a small, fiercely independent press driven by its feminist ethos and its commitment to writers and artists who obey no boundaries, pay no fealty to trends and invite readers to see the world anew by reading word and image in provocative, unfamiliar ways. Hannah Tinti is the author of the novel The Good Thief, which won The Center for Fiction’s first novel prize; the story collection Animal Crackers, a runner-up for the PEN/Hemingway Award; and the novel, The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley, a national bestseller.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 15
5:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 15, 2019, 03/15/2019, Writing Across Genres

Lecture | George Plante: Artist and Propagandist at War


Scottish artist George Plante did not enter World War II as an artist but as a volunteer radio operator in the British merchant fleet. There he spent more than two years engaged in the long-running and fierce Battle of the Atlantic, splitting his time between Britain and the United States. But while dodging U-boats and battling the elements, he also painted. Every time his tanker docked in New York he pursued contacts in the worlds of art and advertising. Even in the midst of a devastating conflict, he never lost sight of his devotion to his craft. Very quickly, he caught the attention of agents of the British Ministry of Information and of the War Artists Advisory Committee. They recruited him to use his paintings of the war at sea for what was seen as a vital effort to rally Americans for the war effort in Britain. In March 1943 Plante’s nautical days ended abruptly after his tanker was torpedoed and sank. Surviving and returning to Britain, he was reassigned to work closely with the Americans in Egypt and Italy, this time to use his art as overt propaganda, both to demonize the Nazi and Fascist enemy and to arouse opposition to them among occupied peoples. Speaker Kathleen Broome Williams, a graduate of Wellesley College and Columbia University, holds a Ph.D. from City University of New York. She is the author of Grace Hopper: Admiral of the Cyber Sea, a North American Society for Oceanic History award winner, Secret Weapon: U.S. High-Frequency Direction Finding in the Battle of the Atlantic, and Improbable Warriors: Women Scientists and the U.S. Navy in World War II, which won a History of Science Society book award. Currently, she is a professor of history at Cogswell Polytechnical College in Sunnyvale, California, and lives in Oakland, CA.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 15
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 15, 2019, 03/15/2019, George Plante: Artist and Propagandist at War

Discussion | SecuriTEA Time: Understanding Cyber Risks


Feel like we’re in a bad episode of Black Mirror? Is Mr.Robot looking more like a documentary? Between the corporate, state, and civilian threats we face, talking about cybersecurity can be overwhelming and stir up a lot of difficult emotions. This social event from the CyPurr Collective hopes to provide a comfortable space to discuss these anxieties as well as current events in the digital world. Let’s build up our digital-agency and form a critical understand the tech encroaching on our lives. All while enjoying delicious tea and snacks, of course.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sun, Mar 17
1:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 17, 2019, 03/17/2019, SecuriTEA Time: Understanding Cyber Risks

Discussion | The Free Press -- with PBS Host Bill Moyers


A free press, with its role as a watchdog of the government, is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. Yet today journalists are under attack. They have been called “the enemy of the people” by our president and silenced by dictatorships around the world. Is freedom of the press in jeopardy, and what is at stake for the future of democracy? Peter Beinart—contributor to The Atlantic, CNN commentator, and a professor—moderates a discussion featuring renowned journalist Bill Moyers, host and producer of many PBS programs; Anne Applebaum, columnist for The Washington Post; Graciela Mochkofsky, award-winning reporter in South America and the U.S. and professor at the Newmark School of Journalism; and Jelani Cobb, staff writer at The New Yorker.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 18
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 18, 2019, 03/18/2019, The Free Press -- with PBS Host Bill Moyers

Discussion | The Secret Sauce Behind Top Chef


For sixteen seasons, Bravo’s reality competition series Top Chef has been showcasing the best chefs across the country in culinary competitions that have entertained foodies everywhere. Hear from judges Tom Colicchio and Gail Simmons on what continues to make the show a success.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
Wed, Mar 20
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, March 20, 2019, 03/20/2019, The Secret Sauce Behind Top Chef

Book Club | A Brief History of Seven Killings: Gunning for Bob Marley


Marlon James combines masterful storytelling with his unrivaled skill at characterization and his meticulous eye for detail to forge a novel of dazzling ambition and scope.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 20
7:00 pm

Free
Book Clubs, March 20, 2019, 03/20/2019, A Brief History of Seven Killings: Gunning for Bob Marley

Talk | A Conversation with Music Director Jaap van Zweden of the New York Philharmonic


As he approaches the end of his inaugural season as music director of the New York Philharmonic, Jaap van Zweden discusses his path to the Philharmonic, the core values he brings to his musicianship and the Orchestra, and his views on the role of the symphony orchestra in the 21st century.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Mar 20
7:30 pm

Free
Talks, March 20, 2019, 03/20/2019, A Conversation with Music Director Jaap van Zweden of the New York Philharmonic

Lecture | Muslims in Transition: Religion and Politics in Western Europe


This talk will critically trace the emergence of ‘’Islam’’ and ‘Muslim” as politicized and securitized categories in Western Europe. It will then turn to an in-depth case study on Shia Muslim community formation in the United Kingdom. In doing so, it aims to show how the political climate in Europe and the Middle East region has not only complicated the role of Islam in western secular societies, but has complicated and transformed communal boundaries and networks within and between Muslim communities in Western Europe. Speaker Kathryn Spellman Poots is a Visiting Associate Professor at Columbia University and Academic Program Director for the MA in Islamic Studies.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 21
4:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 21, 2019, 03/21/2019, Muslims in Transition: Religion and Politics in Western Europe

Talk | An Ever Fresh Pleasure: Equestrian Life along the Bloomingdale Road


Before there was Central Park, with its miles of bridle paths and drives, avid equestrians and devotees of fast harness horses or slower moving carriages could travel the network of roads and farm lanes that meandered the length and breadth of Manhattan. Day-tripping on the Bloomingdale Road – with its grand vistas, hidden coves, inns, and taverns – was among the most popular pastimes for Manhattan’s riders and drivers. The opening of Central Park only added to the attraction of riding and driving the old roads, and as the city grew, the west side, in particular, became home to some of the most influential riding schools and clubs in the United States. Speaker Judith Martin Woodall was the office manager of the Claremont Riding Academy for twenty-seven years. She received the John H. Daniels Fellowship at the National Sporting Library and Museum in Middleburg, Virginia for her project, Witching the World with Noble Horsemanship: Riding in New York City, 1770-2007.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 21
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, March 21, 2019, 03/21/2019, An Ever Fresh Pleasure: Equestrian Life along the Bloomingdale Road

Discussion | Discussion On American Women Artists Working Before 1945 


American women artists working before 1945 had to navigate societal expectations of women’s domestic roles with their drive to be  professionals. These artists often faced difficult choices–-sacrificing in their personal lives or in their careers. Despite evident talent and success, most fell into obscurity with their death. In this interactive session, you can discover and closely examine works by women artists who collectively paint a picture of a changing America. Host Rena Tobey’s greatest passion is making art accessible, invigorating, insightful, and fun. She taught art history at Connecticut State University. Now, she teaches at the 92nd Street Y, conducts lively tours of museum collections, and provides talks on American art for community organizations.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Mar 23
11:00 am

Free
Discussions, March 23, 2019, 03/23/2019, Discussion On&nbsp;American Women Artists Working Before 1945&nbsp;

Discussion | What’s in Store for Census 2020?


We know 2020 will be a pivotal year. Rolling out of the 2020 Census, though it might not sound too exciting, will be a key moment in 2020. Participating in the Census is our right and civic duty.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Mon, Mar 25
4:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 25, 2019, 03/25/2019, What&rsquo;s in Store for Census 2020?

Lecture | Divine Diamonds: Gender, Embodiment, and Movement in the French Suburbs


Two recent French films directed by women and featuring racially and ethnically marked girls’ bodies in movement, have achieved notable critical and popular success. Residents of the Parisian suburbs, these girls share a heritage of post/colonial immigration. This talk interrogates how these films represent gendered bodies and how those bodies are offered to be seen, but also how they relate to the space of the banlieue. To what degree do the social microcosms these “bandes de filles” represent figure as aspirational utopian alternatives to the lived realities of French suburban poverty? Framed by feminist and phenomenological considerations of the body in film, speaker Margaret C. Flinn seeks to nuance such theorizations with specificities of how race and gender in France are represented today.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 26
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 26, 2019, 03/26/2019, Divine Diamonds: Gender, Embodiment, and Movement in the French Suburbs

Talk | Photographer Talk: A Photojournalist's Story


One of the youngest members of the VII Photo Agency, photojournalist Christopher Lee first published a story in The New York Times about illegal bike racing. Since then, he has had the opportunity to pursue stories on the refugee crisis in Europe, the war against ISIS in Iraq and the protest movement in the United States. He is currently working on a long-term project about the Korean Diaspora in Japan.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Mar 26
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 26, 2019, 03/26/2019, Photographer Talk: A Photojournalist's Story

Lecture | From the New Left to Gay Liberation


Ben Serby will deliver this lecture.   
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 28
4:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 28, 2019, 03/28/2019, From the New Left to Gay Liberation

Lecture | The Role of Finance Capital in Ownership Concentration, Inequality and Climate Change


This presentation makes use of data synthesised from the Bureau van Dyk (which contains information from around 100 sources and covers over 60 million listed companies around the world), to estimate the nature and form of ownership of very large corporations globally, and in selected countries including the USA. Questions to be addressed include: • to what extent does finance capital control the ownership of large corporations, through what mechanisms, and how does this vary between some leading countries? • has the concentration of ownership increased in recent periods? • what are the implications for inequality? • how does the ownership of large firms relate to action (or inaction) on climate change, and what are the implications for future action in this area?   David Peetz is Professor of Employment Relations at Griffith University, in the Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Mar 28
4:30 pm

Free
Lectures, March 28, 2019, 03/28/2019, The Role of Finance Capital in Ownership Concentration, Inequality and Climate Change

Conference | French Decolonization in Global Perspective


This conference will explore the process of French decolonization in the twentieth century in the context of broad global developments, movements, ideas, and policies. It aims to evaluate recent trends in the fields of French history and the history of decolonization and to suggest possible avenues for future inquiry. It will focus on several intersecting themes, such as decolonization and European integration, the rise of international organizations and the role they played in shaping French decolonization, and the Algerian War in global context.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 29
9:00 am

Free
Conferences, March 29, 2019, 03/29/2019, French Decolonization in Global Perspective

Lecture | Clarissa: A Novel by the Numbers


Samuel Richardson's Clarissa can seem like a novel about the attenuation of the material body, but in tension with such an account, this talk argues that Clarissa's body is asserted by numbers, constituted by abstraction, rather than eliminated by it. Centering Clarissa's meticulous logging of her daily life prior to her rape, it asks which kinds of experiences lend themselves to quantification and which affective states might even be generated from numbers.  With: Stephanie Insley Hershinow, Baruch College
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 29
4:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 29, 2019, 03/29/2019, Clarissa: A Novel by the Numbers

Discussion | The South China Sea: US Foreign Policy Challenges and Geo-Political Impacts


Conflict in the South China Sea has become one of the most significant geopolitical concerns of the 21st century. It is estimated that that $5.3 trillion worth of goods moves through the South China Sea annually, 1.2 trillion of which is with the US. Around forty percent of global liquefied natural gas trade moves through the South China Sea. Any military conflict there would cripple critical global supply chains. In recent years, China has undertaken efforts to reclaim thousands of square feet in the South China Sea. Its construction of artificial islands and infrastructure such as  runways, support buildings, loading piers, and possible satellite communication antennas has prompted its neighbors and the US to question China’s motives. The US Navy sends ships into the South China Sea to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese, and some Southeast Asian navies operate. The slightest miscalculation could have dire consequences not just for Sino-US relations but also have implications for the region. Can there be a “win win” situation in the South China Sea? What are China’s ultimate objectives? What should the US’s strategic goals be? How should the US and other countries within the region avoid conflict and instead foster a greater sense of trust and enhance cooperation in the South China Sea?    
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 29
6:00 pm

Free
Discussions, March 29, 2019, 03/29/2019, The South China Sea: US Foreign Policy Challenges and Geo-Political Impacts

Talk | Pre-Concert Dicussion: Miles Davis’ Electric Period


This discussion explores Miles Davis’ “electric period”— one of the most influential and passionately debated eras in all of modern music. Miles Davis was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. He is among the most influential and acclaimed figures in the history of jazz and 20th century music. Davis adopted a variety of musical directions in a five-decade career that kept him at the forefront of many major stylistic developments in jazz.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Mar 29
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 29, 2019, 03/29/2019, Pre-Concert Dicussion: Miles Davis&rsquo; Electric Period

Lecture | Why the New Cold War Is More Dangerous Than the One We Survived


Questionable but orthodox Cold War narratives make actual war with Russia more likely than at any time in the past forty years. Lecturer Stephen F. Cohen is a contributing editor at The Nation. He teaches at New York University and Princeton University
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, Mar 29
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, March 29, 2019, 03/29/2019, Why the New Cold War Is More Dangerous Than the One We Survived

Talk | Pre-Concert Dicussion: Miles Davis’ Electric Period


This discussion explores Miles Davis’ “electric period”— one of the most influential and passionately debated eras in all of modern music. Miles Davis was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. He is among the most influential and acclaimed figures in the history of jazz and 20th century music. Davis adopted a variety of musical directions in a five-decade career that kept him at the forefront of many major stylistic developments in jazz.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Mar 30
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, March 30, 2019, 03/30/2019, Pre-Concert Dicussion:&nbsp;Miles Davis&rsquo; Electric Period

Discussion | Black in Ballet


Last autumn, we mourned the passing of the great Arthur Mitchell. This year with the 50th Anniversary of Dance Theatre of Harlem, we pay tribute to his legacy. Let’s talk about the history and current achievements of Black dancers in ballet. How are Black dancers and choreographers re-envisioning this dance form and shaping its future? What role will the new Equity Project play? Guest Host: Danni Gee Core Participants: Virginia Johnson, Theresa Ruth Howard, Chris Rudd, Gabrielle Civil, Maxfield Raul Trucios Haynes
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Apr 3
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, April 03, 2019, 04/03/2019, Black in Ballet

Conference | Unknowability: How Do We Know What Cannot Be Known?


From the earliest moments of humanity’s search for answers and explanations, we have grappled with the unknowable, that which we are unable or not permitted to know. What does the history of the unknowable look like? What are the questions once thought to be unanswerable that have been answered? Are there enduring unknowables and if so, what are they? This conference affords a rare opportunity for scholars from different fields to engage with each other and with the general public on this issue, particularly while we are living in what some might call a post-truth world. At a time when the distinction between what is true and what is not has become increasingly problematic, focusing attention on how we know what we cannot know has become essential.  
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Apr 4
3:00 pm

Free
Conferences, April 04, 2019, 04/04/2019, Unknowability: How Do We Know What Cannot Be Known?

Discussion | Black in Ballet


Last autumn, we mourned the passing of the great Arthur Mitchell. This year with the 50th Anniversary of Dance Theatre of Harlem, we pay tribute to his legacy. Let’s talk about the history and current achievements of Black dancers in ballet. How are Black dancers and choreographers re-envisioning this dance form and shaping its future? What role will the new Equity Project play? Guest Host: Danni Gee Core Participants: Virginia Johnson, Theresa Ruth Howard, Chris Rudd, Gabrielle Civil, Maxfield Raul Trucios Haynes
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Apr 4
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, April 04, 2019, 04/04/2019, Black in Ballet

Conference | Unknowability: How Do We Know What Cannot Be Known?


From the earliest moments of humanity’s search for answers and explanations, we have grappled with the unknowable, that which we are unable or not permitted to know. What does the history of the unknowable look like? What are the questions once thought to be unanswerable that have been answered? Are there enduring unknowables and if so, what are they? This conference affords a rare opportunity for scholars from different fields to engage with each other and with the general public on this issue, particularly while we are living in what some might call a post-truth world. At a time when the distinction between what is true and what is not has become increasingly problematic, focusing attention on how we know what we cannot know has become essential.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Apr 5
11:00 am

Free
Conferences, April 05, 2019, 04/05/2019, Unknowability: How Do We Know What Cannot Be Known?

Talk | 'Being Cool' as Survival


Choreographer Evelyn Lilian Sánchez Narvaez is a wild woman-child fighting to understand the depths of her inner power. She will be unearthing her story of “being cool” as survival.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Apr 5
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, April 05, 2019, 04/05/2019, 'Being Cool' as Survival

Talk | Pre-Concert Discussion: Bebop Saxophonist and Pianist 


This discussion provides background to the McCoy Tyner and Charles McPherson at 80 concert, also featuring the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. Pianist McCoy Tyner and saxophonist Charles McPherson are both true living legends, each of them 80 years old, and they’re here to prove that jazz keeps you young. Charles McPherson is a singular bebop saxophonist. After playing with Charles Mingus for over a decade, McPherson has been traveling all over the world as a renowned leader and mentor. He remains one of the few musicians able to channel the classic bebop might of predecessors like Charlie Parker, but he possesses a powerful style of his own as both a composer and soloist.  Jazz Master McCoy Tyner is an artist whose enduring influence cannot be overstated. Tyner has made invaluable contributions to some of jazz’s greatest concerts and albums, including A Love Supreme, My Favorite Things, and Live at the Village Vanguard as a member of the John Coltrane Quartet.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Apr 6
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, April 06, 2019, 04/06/2019, Pre-Concert Discussion: Bebop Saxophonist and Pianist&nbsp;

Talk | Pre-Concert Discussion: Bebop Saxophonist and Pianist


This discussion provides background to the McCoy Tyner and Charles McPherson at 80 concert, also featuring the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. Pianist McCoy Tyner and saxophonist Charles McPherson are both true living legends, each of them 80 years old, and they’re here to prove that jazz keeps you young. Charles McPherson is a singular bebop saxophonist. After playing with Charles Mingus for over a decade, McPherson has been traveling all over the world as a renowned leader and mentor. He remains one of the few musicians able to channel the classic bebop might of predecessors like Charlie Parker, but he possesses a powerful style of his own as both a composer and soloist.  Jazz Master McCoy Tyner is an artist whose enduring influence cannot be overstated. Tyner has made invaluable contributions to some of jazz’s greatest concerts and albums, including A Love Supreme, My Favorite Things, and Live at the Village Vanguard as a member of the John Coltrane Quartet.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sun, Apr 7
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, April 07, 2019, 04/07/2019, Pre-Concert Discussion: Bebop Saxophonist and Pianist

Lecture | The Importance of Kleine Krieg: Logistics, Operations, and 'Little War' in the Late 17th-Century Low Countries


"Kleine Krieg" is the German term for "petty warfare." Associate Professor John Stapleton of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point discusses it in relation to war in the low countries of Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands in the late 1600s.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Apr 12
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, April 12, 2019, 04/12/2019, The Importance of Kleine Krieg: Logistics, Operations, and 'Little War' in the Late 17th-Century Low Countries

Discussion | The Art of the Audio Interview


We are in a golden age of the audio interview. News organizations are creating audio offerings in various formats, drawing millions of listeners who want to hear more and more via radio, podcasts and streaming services. What makes us want to listen whether we're in our cars, on our phones or in our homes? What are the secrets behind great audio interviews? Hear from All of It host Alison Stewart, United States of Anxiety and Caught host Kai Wright and others as they reveal how they produce and present compelling programming that is changing how we experience news, information and entertainment.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Tue, Apr 16
7:00 pm

Free
Discussions, April 16, 2019, 04/16/2019, The Art of the Audio Interview

Talk | Neighborhood Stores, Past and Future


Speaker Jen Rubin is the author of We Are Staying: Eighty Years in the Life of a Family, a Store, and a Neighborhood. She is is a former New Yorker living in Madison, Wisconsin. An obsessive maker of mixed tapes and quite possibly the best challah baker in town, she has worked for social change throughout her career. Jen leads storytelling workshops around Madison, teaches the occasional social policy class at the University of Wisconsin School of Social Work, and works at the Wisconsin Historical Society Press. Jen likes to tell a good story and hear a good story and coproduces the Moth StorySlam in Madison.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Apr 18
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, April 18, 2019, 04/18/2019, Neighborhood Stores, Past and Future

Talk | Pre-Concert Dicussion: 9-Time Grammy Winning Jazz Musician


This discussion explores  the shared roots found throughout American music. Wynton Marsalis is an American trumpeter, composer, teacher, and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. He has promoted classical and jazz music, often to young audiences. Marsalis has been awarded nine Grammy Awards and his Blood on the Fields was the first jazz composition to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. He is the son of jazz musician Ellis Marsalis Jr. (pianist), grandson of Ellis Marsalis Sr., and brother of Branford (saxophonist), Delfeayo (trombonist), and Jason (drummer). Marsalis is the only musician to win a Grammy Award in jazz and classical during the same year.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Apr 25
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, April 25, 2019, 04/25/2019, Pre-Concert Dicussion: 9-Time Grammy Winning Jazz Musician

Lecture | War by Numbers: Understanding Conventional Combat


War by Numbers assesses the nature of conventional warfare through the analysis of historical combat. In his new book, Christopher A. Lawrence of the Dupuy Institute establishes what we know about conventional combat and why we know it. By demonstrating the impact a variety of factors have on combat he moves such analysis into modern data and interpretation. Using vast data sets, Lawrence examines force ratios, the human factor in case studies from World War II and beyond, the combat value of superior situational awareness, and the effects of dispersion, among other elements. Lawrence challenges existing interpretations of conventional warfare and shows how such combat should be conducted in the future, simultaneously broadening our understanding of what it means to fight wars by the numbers. Christopher A. Lawrence is a professional historian and military analyst and has participated in studies for the U.S. Army, the U.S. Department of Defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the U.S. Air Force. He is the executive director and president of the Dupuy Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to scholarly research and objective analysis of historical data related to armed conflict. Lawrence is the author of Kursk: The Battle of Prokhorovka and America’s Modern Wars: Understanding Iraq, Afghanistan, and Vietnam.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Apr 26
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, April 26, 2019, 04/26/2019, War by Numbers: Understanding Conventional Combat

Talk | Pre-Concert Dicussion: 9-Time Grammy Winning Jazz Musician


This discussion explores  the shared roots found throughout American music. Wynton Marsalis is an American trumpeter, composer, teacher, and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. He has promoted classical and jazz music, often to young audiences. Marsalis has been awarded nine Grammy Awards and his Blood on the Fields was the first jazz composition to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. He is the son of jazz musician Ellis Marsalis Jr. (pianist), grandson of Ellis Marsalis Sr., and brother of Branford (saxophonist), Delfeayo (trombonist), and Jason (drummer). Marsalis is the only musician to win a Grammy Award in jazz and classical during the same year.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Apr 26
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, April 26, 2019, 04/26/2019, Pre-Concert Dicussion: 9-Time Grammy Winning Jazz Musician

Talk | Pre-Concert Dicussion: 9-Time Grammy Winning Jazz Musician


This discussion explores  the shared roots found throughout American music. Wynton Marsalis is an American trumpeter, composer, teacher, and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. He has promoted classical and jazz music, often to young audiences. Marsalis has been awarded nine Grammy Awards and his Blood on the Fields was the first jazz composition to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. He is the son of jazz musician Ellis Marsalis Jr. (pianist), grandson of Ellis Marsalis Sr., and brother of Branford (saxophonist), Delfeayo (trombonist), and Jason (drummer). Marsalis is the only musician to win a Grammy Award in jazz and classical during the same year.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Sat, Apr 27
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, April 27, 2019, 04/27/2019, Pre-Concert Dicussion: 9-Time Grammy Winning Jazz Musician

Discussion | Dance Is Sex Positive


A conversation on bodily pleasure from the perspective of dance—decolonizing sexuality as a theme in dance and empowering joy as a way of healthy sexuality. Guest Host: Sydnie Mosley Core Participants: Antonio Ramos, luciana achugar, Ashley RT Yergens, David Thomson, Sarah A. O. Rosner
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, May 1
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, May 01, 2019, 05/01/2019, Dance Is Sex Positive

Discussion | Dance Is Sex Positive


A conversation on bodily pleasure from the perspective of dance—decolonizing sexuality as a theme in dance and empowering joy as a way of healthy sexuality. Guest Host: Sydnie Mosley Core Participants: Antonio Ramos, luciana achugar, Ashley RT Yergens, David Thomson, Sarah A. O. Rosner
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, May 2
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, May 02, 2019, 05/02/2019, Dance Is Sex Positive

Talk | A Choreographer Obsessed with the Dances of Language


Aynsley Vandenbroucke is a choreographer obsessed with the movement ideas and the dances of language. Her performances have been presented by Abrons Arts Center, The Chocolate Factory Theater, Danspace Project, Experiments and Disorders at Dixon Place, and others. Her writing has been published in The Brooklyn Rail, Movement Research Performance Journal, and Seneca Review (forthcoming).
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, May 3
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, May 03, 2019, 05/03/2019, A Choreographer Obsessed with the Dances of Language

Lecture | Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam


Using newly available archival material from the Nixon Presidential Library, Kissinger's personal papers, and material from the archives in Vietnam, Robert K. Brigham, a specialist on the history of U.S. foreign policy, punctures the myth of Kissinger as an infallible mastermind. Instead, he constructs a portrait of a rash, opportunistic, and suggestible politician. It was personal political rivalries, the domestic political climate, and strategic confusion that drove Kissinger's actions. There was no great master plan or Bismarckian theory that supported how the US continued the war or conducted peace negotiations. Its length was doubled for nothing but ego and poor judgment. The American war in Vietnam was concluded in 1973 after eight years of fighting, bloodshed, and loss. Yet the terms of the truce that ended the war were effectively identical to what had been offered to the Nixon administration four years earlier. Those four years cost America and Vietnam thousands of lives and billions of dollars, and they were the direct result of the supposed master plan of the most important voice in American foreign policy: Henry Kissinger. Robert. K. Brigham is the Shirley Ecker Boskey Professor of History and International Relations at Vassar College. He is a specialist on the history of U.S. foreign policy. His fellowships include the Rockefeller Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for Humanities. Brigham is author or co-author of nine books, among them Iraq, Vietnam, and the Limits of American Power (PublicAffairs, 2008) and Argument Without End (PublicAffairs, 1999).
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, May 3
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, May 03, 2019, 05/03/2019, Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam

Talk | The Waterfront and Railroad Along the Upper West Side


Speaker Kurt Schlichting is the author of Waterfront Manhattan: From Henry Hudson to the High Line. Schlichting is the E. Gerald Corrigan ’63 Chair in Humanities and Social Sciences at Fairfield University, where he is a professor of sociology. He is the author of Grand Central’s Engineer: William J. Wilgus and the Planning of Modern Manhattan and Grand Central Terminal: Railroads, Engineering, and Architecture in New York City.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, May 9
6:30 pm

Free
Talks, May 09, 2019, 05/09/2019, The Waterfront and Railroad Along the Upper West Side

Lecture | Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam


While most historians of the Vietnam War focus on the origins of U.S. involvement and the Americanization of the conflict, Lien-Hang T. Nguyen examines the international context in which North Vietnamese leaders pursued the war and American intervention ended. This riveting narrative takes the reader from the marshy swamps of the Mekong Delta to the bomb-saturated Red River Delta, from the corridors of power in Hanoi and Saigon to the Nixon White House, and from the peace negotiations in Paris to high-level meetings in Beijing and Moscow, all to reveal that peace never had a chance in Vietnam. Hanoi's War renders transparent the internal workings of America's most elusive enemy and shows that the war fought during the peace negotiations was bloodier and much more wide-ranging than it had been previously. Using never-before-seen archival materials from the Vietnam Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as materials from other archives around the world, Nguyen explores the politics of war-making and peace-making not only from the North Vietnamese perspective but also from that of South Vietnam, the Soviet Union, China, and the United States, presenting a uniquely international portrait. Lien-Hang T. Nguyen is the Dorothy Borg Associate Professor in the History of the United States and East Asia at Columbia University. She received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. from Yale University.
   New York City, NY; NYC
Fri, May 24
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, May 24, 2019, 05/24/2019, Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam

Discussion | Audience: A Discussion


How do dance and performance artists view their relationship with audiences? Moving beyond the “fourth wall,” can there be collaboration and reliance between artists and audiences? What do you expect from—or hope for—your audiences? What is the role of consent in audience participation? What creative ideas and approaches help attract and engage new audiences? Share what has—or has not—worked for you. Guest Host: Mary Ellen Beaudreau Core Participants: Torya Beard, Maria Bauman-Morales, Patricia Hoffbauer
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Wed, Jun 5
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, June 05, 2019, 06/05/2019, Audience: A Discussion

Discussion | Audience: A Discussion


How do dance and performance artists view their relationship with audiences? Moving beyond the “fourth wall,” can there be collaboration and reliance between artists and audiences? What do you expect from—or hope for—your audiences? What is the role of consent in audience participation? What creative ideas and approaches help attract and engage new audiences? Share what has—or has not—worked for you. Guest Host: Mary Ellen Beaudreau Core Participants: Torya Beard, Maria Bauman-Morales, Patricia Hoffbauer
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Thu, Jun 6
6:30 pm

Free
Discussions, June 06, 2019, 06/06/2019, Audience: A Discussion

Lecture | Advocating Overlord: The D-Day Strategy and the Atomic Bomb


“Well there it is. It won’t work, but you must bloody well make it,” said the chief of Britain’s military leaders, when he gave orders to begin planning for what became known as Operation Overlord. While many view D-Day as one of the most successful operations of World War II, most aren’t aware of the intensive year of planning and political tension between the Allies that preceded the amphibious military landing on June 6, 1944. This intriguing history reveals how President Franklin D. Roosevelt altered his attitude toward Winston Churchill and became an advocate for Operation Overlord. Philip Padgett challenges the known narrative of this watershed moment in history and illuminates the diplomatic link between Normandy and the atomic bomb. He shows how the Allies came to agree on a liberation strategy that began with D-Day—and the difficult forging of British and American scientific cooperation that produced the atomic bomb. At its core this story is about how a new generation of leaders found the courage to step beyond national biases in a truly allied endeavor to carry out one of history’s most successful military operations. Philip Padgett spent forty years working in national security and preparedness analysis in the military, government, and the private sector. As deputy intelligence adviser at the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, he supported negotiations for five international treaties and agreements. On contract, he has led integrated analyses for studies of the East-West military balance, nuclear doctrine and deterrence, NATO command and control, and arms control compliance monitoring.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Jun 7
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, June 07, 2019, 06/07/2019, Advocating Overlord: The D-Day Strategy and the Atomic Bomb

Talk | A Non-Binary Transwoman Theatre-Maker


Adelaide (Matthew Dicken) is a non-binary transwoman Pisces theatre-maker and resource-mover; she is a movement fundraiser, organizer, collaborator or collective member of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, the NYC Trans Oral History Project, Survived & Punished NY, Free University NYC, ACRE, Angela’s Pulse and PURPOSE Productions. They will share recent writing touched by grassroots abolitionist movements committed to freeing criminalized survivors and building support structures for trans economic self-determination.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Jun 14
7:00 pm

Free
Talks, June 14, 2019, 06/14/2019, A Non-Binary Transwoman Theatre-Maker

Lecture | Change from the Trenches: Innovation in Technology and Tactics from the Ranks of the British Army during the First World War


A lecture by Andrea Siotto of Temple University. Siotto is an Italian Ph.D. student at the History Department at Temple. He is interested in the technological development before and during the First World War. He holds a B.A. in Art History and a M.A. in History from the Università degli Studi Roma Tre in Rome, Italy, where he specialized in the History of the Italian Risorgimento. He is very interested in understanding how to integrate digital instruments into research and teaching in the humanities.
   New York City, NY; NYC
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Fri, Jun 14
7:00 pm

Free
Lectures, June 14, 2019, 06/14/2019, Change from the Trenches: Innovation in Technology and Tactics from the Ranks of the British Army during the First World War
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